Last Page Old Tinvan



Tribute to Liu Xiaobo

Thư tín:

Dang o Cuba, internet cong san khg lam chi duoc!!

Bon voyage & Sois-heureuse & Take Care
GCC

China’s conscience
The suffering of a remarkable political prisoner holds a message for China
And for the West, too.

LIU XIAOBO, who died on July 13th, was hardly a household name in the West. Yet of those in China who have called for democracy, resisting the Communist Party’s ruthless efforts to prevent it from ever taking hold, Mr Liu’s name stands out. His dignified, calm and persistent calls for freedom for China’s people made Mr Liu one of the global giants of moral dissent, who belongs with Andrei Sakharov and Nelson Mandela—and like them was a prisoner of conscience and a winner of the Nobel peace prize.

Mr Liu died in a hospital bed in north-eastern China from liver cancer (see article). The suffering endured by Mr Liu, his family and friends was compounded by his miserable circumstances. Mr Liu, an academic and author specialising in literature and philosophy, was eight years into an 11-year sentence for subversion (see our obituary). His crime was to write a petition calling for democracy, a cause he had been championing for decades—he was prominent in the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Though in a civilian hospital, he was still kept as a prisoner. The government refused his and his family’s requests that he be allowed to seek treatment abroad. It posted guards around his ward, deployed its army of internet censors to rub out any expression of sympathy for him, and ordered his family to be silent. The Communist Party wants the world to forget Mr Liu and what he stood for. There is a danger that it will.
A cynical game
Western governments have a long history of timidity and cynicism in their responses to China’s abysmal treatment of dissidents. In the 1980s, as China began to open to the outside world, Western leaders were so eager to win its support in their struggle against the Soviet Union that they made little fuss about China’s political prisoners. Why upset the reform-minded Deng Xiaoping by harping on about people like Wei Jingsheng, then serving a 15-year term for his role in the Democracy Wall movement, which had seen protests spread across China and which Deng had crushed in 1979?

The attitudes of Western leaders changed in 1989 when Deng suppressed the Tiananmen unrest, resulting in hundreds of deaths. Suddenly it was fashionable to complain about jailing dissidents (it helped that China seemed less important when the Soviet Union was crumbling). From time to time the government would release someone, in the hope of rehabilitating itself in the eyes of the world. Western leaders were grateful. They wanted to show their own people, still outraged by the slaughter in Beijing, that censure was working.

By the mid-1990s China’s economy was booming and commerce consigned dissidents to the margins once again. In the eyes of Western officials, China was becoming too rich to annoy. The world’s biggest firms were falling over themselves to enter its market. America, Britain and other countries set up “human-rights dialogues”—useful for separating humanitarian niceties from high-level dealmaking. The global financial crisis in 2008 tipped the balance further. The West began to see China as its economic saviour. Earlier this month leaders of the G20 group of countries, including China’s president, Xi Jinping, gathered in Germany for an annual meeting. There was not a peep from any of them about Mr Liu, whose terminal illness had just been made known.

Time to name names

Why complain? China retaliates against countries that criticise its human-rights record. It restored relations with Norway only last year, having curtailed them after Oslo had hosted the Nobel ceremony in 2010 at which Mr Liu got his prize (as China would not free him, he was represented by an empty chair).

Moreover, Mr Xi is unlikely to listen. Before he took power in 2012 he scoffed at “a few foreigners, with full bellies, who have nothing better to do than try to point fingers at our country.” In office he has ratcheted up pressure on dissidents and others who annoy the Communist Party, helped by new security laws (see article). He is also embracing new technologies, such as artificial intelligence, which promise to monitor troublemakers more effectively (see article).
Yet there are good reasons why Western leaders should speak out loudly for China’s dissidents all the same. For one thing, it is easy to exaggerate China’s ability to retaliate—especially if the West acts as one. The Chinese economy depends on trade. Even for little Norway, the economic impact of the spat was limited. For another, speaking out challenges Mr Xi in his belief that jailing peaceful dissenters is normal. Silence only encourages him to lock up yet more activists. And remember that, for those who risk everything in pursuit of democracy, the knowledge that they have Western support is a huge boost even if it will not secure their release or better their lot.

A vital principle is at stake, too. In recent years there has been much debate in China about whether values are universal or culturally specific. Keeping quiet about Mr Liu signalled that the West tacitly agrees with Mr Xi—that there are no overarching values and the West thus has no right to comment on China’s or how they are applied. This message not only undermines the cause of liberals in China, it also helps Mr Xi cover up a flaw in his argument. China, like Western countries, is a signatory to the UN’s Universal Declaration, which says: “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.” If the West is too selfish and cynical to put any store by universal values when they are flouted in China, it risks eroding them across the world and, ultimately, at home too.
The West should have spoken up for Mr Liu. He represented the best kind of dissent in China. The blueprint for democracy, known as Charter 08, which landed him in prison, was clear in its demands: for an end to one-party rule and for genuine freedoms. Mr Liu’s aim was not to trigger upheaval, but to encourage peaceful discussion. He briefly succeeded. Hundreds of people, including prominent intellectuals, had signed the charter by the time Mr Liu was hauled away to his cell. Since then, the Communist Party’s censors and goons have stifled debate. The West must stop doing their work for them.

Note: Tờ Người Kinh Tế, khi để tên Liu Xiaobo, kế tên hai người, là Andrei Sakharov, và Nelson Mandela, theo GCC, là 1 vinh danh lớn lao nhất dành cho ông. Và 1 kỳ vọng lớn lao. Sakkarov, được Liên Xô cưng chiều như thế, cha đẻ bom nguyên tử, vậy mà ông vẫn nói "Không" với nhà nước, khi phản đối Liên Xô xâm lăng A Phú Hãn, và bằng lòng đi tù, và trở về trong vinh quang, trong chiến thắng. Mandela mà không ghê ư. Nếu không có ông, lục địa Phi Châu bây giờ ra sao.  
Bài viết của Người Kinh Tế, 1 phần nào, còn là để chỉ trích Tây Phương, đã không lên tiếng:

The West should have spoken up for Mr Liu. He represented the best kind of dissent in China. The blueprint for democracy, known as Charter 08, which landed him in prison, was clear in its demands: for an end to one-party rule and for genuine freedoms. Mr Liu’s aim was not to trigger upheaval, but to encourage peaceful discussion. He briefly succeeded. Hundreds of people, including prominent intellectuals, had signed the charter by the time Mr Liu was hauled away to his cell. Since then, the Communist Party’s censors and goons have stifled debate. The West must stop doing their work for them.

Nhưng vẫn theo GCC, Cái Ác Trung Hoa, và Cái Ác Bắc Kít, cho tới nay, kể như vô phương, chưa kiếm ra thuốc chủng!

http://www.tanvien.net/tribute/Tribute_Sakharov.html

Note: Khi NBC được Nobel Toán, GNV đã mơ mòng tưởng tượng ra, một cú tương tự như trên.
“Chàng” đứng giữa Bắc Bộ Phủ, Ba Đình, Lăng Bác H… dõng dạc cảnh cáo:
"Không có chiến thắng nào mà không có thể đảo ngược, không có thất bại nào là chung quyết. Đó là điều làm cho cuộc đời xứng đáng để cho chúng ta sống, nó".
Ui chao, mừng hụt! NQT
http://www.tanvien.net/Tribute_1/Nelson_Mandela.html


*

Nelson Mandela

Note: Thú thực, Gấu đang chờ bài ai điếu này của tờ Người Kinh Tế. Tờ báo thần sầu, ở “ai điếu”, ở “điểm sách”.
Bài về "Solzhenitsyn mũi tẹt, Bắc Kít", mà chẳng tuyệt cú mèo ư? (1)
Mít, không tên nào viết nổi.
Modesty, humility, vanity
“There are times when a leader must move ahead of his flock.”



Tribute to Simone Veil

SN_GCC_2017


*

Ông anh khác thằng em, viết hoài được hoài!
Ham hố hoài nữa chứ!
[Note: Mấy cái hình 'kiều nữ' Playboy, Tháng Tám 2017, mừng SN/GCC, click 1 phát, không dám để ở frontpage]

*

*

Chuyện Tình
Chỉ có truyện tình là vĩ đại thôi. K phán.

Gấu mua cuốn Into The Looking-Glass Wood của Alberto Manguel cũng lâu rồi, có đọc lai rai, vì là 1 tác giả Gấu mê, ngay từ lúc vừa ra hải ngoại, qua sự giới thiệu của Nguyễn Tiến Văn, với cuốn A History of Reading của ông. Bữa nay lôi ra đọc, vớ đúng 1 bài thật là thần sầu “Borges in Love”.
Manguel đã từng hân hạnh là người đọc truyện cho Borges, khi ông bị mù. Bài viết kể về cuộc tình của Borges với Estela Canto, và Borges viết truyện The Aleph, là để tặng vị này.
Sau đây là link bản tiếng Anh, và bản tiếng Việt (Da Màu).
Tiép đó, Gấu bèn lai rai về truyện ngắn The Aleph.

http://damau.org/archives/43270

http://www.phinnweb.org/links/literature/borges/aleph.html

In a 1970 commentary on the story, Borges explained, "What eternity is to time, the Aleph is to space." As the narrator of the story discovers, however, trying to describe such an idea in conventional terms can prove a daunting—even impossible—task.

Trong 1 lần còm, Borges giải thích, "cái" là "vĩnh cửu" với thời gian, thì với The Aleph, "nó" là "không gian".
Món quà của Borges tặng em, đúng là như thế, cái "nơi chốn của tất cả nơi chốn"

Bạn đọc Tin Văn hẳn cũng đã đọc MCNK của TTT, trên Tin Văn, và chắc hẳn cũng khổ tâm như Duy, 1 nhân vật ở trong truyện. Duy băn khoăn, thế rồi Hiền đi đâu. Kiệt thì giải thích với vợ là, anh đưa Hiền tới đó, rồi lại về với em.
Chỗ đó là chỗ nào?

Có lần Gấu gọi nơi chốn đó, là Lost Domain, muợn từ Anh Môn. Nhưng Manguel cho biết, đó là Ithaca: The place that is all places, tức là The Aleph.
Borges cho biết, ông cảm thấy định mệnh của ông, là, đếch được hạnh phúc, that it was not his destiny to be happy. Quái làm sao, Gấu cũng đã từng bị phán như thế, qua ông bạn chưa từng được gặp là nhà văn Doãn Dân, sĩ quan VNCH, đã tử trận. Nhớ là, Nguyễn Tân Văn, bạn thời còn đi học của Gấu, có lần đưa cho anh đọc cuốn “Những ngày ở Sài Gòn”, đọc xong, anh phán, thằng cha này quá sợ hạnh phúc! (1)

Doãn Dân: Tên Trần Doãn Dân, sinh năm 1938 tại Nam Định. Sĩ quan. Tử trận tại Quảng Trị ngày 29.4.1972
Tác phẩm: Chỗ của Huệ, 1968; Tiếng gọi thầm, 1972
Võ Phiến VHTQ


(1)

Once again, Borges felt that it was not his destiny to be happy. Literature provided consolation, but never quite enough, since it also brought back memories of each loss or failure, as he knew when he wrote the last lines of the first sonnet in the diptych "1964":

No one loses (you repeat in vain)
Except that which he doesn't have and never
Had, but it isn't sufficient to be brave
To learn the art of oblivion,
A symbol, a rose tears you apart
And a guitar can kill you.

Bài viết "Borgres Iêu" thật là tuyệt vời. Từ từ tính.

Solitude
There now, where the first crumb
Falls from the table
You think no one hears it
As it hits the floor,
But somewhere already
The ants are putting on
Their Quaker hats
And setting out to visit you.
Charles Simic:  Selected Early Poems
Cô đơn
Chủ nhật, sáng nay, ở một Starbucks, ở Tiểu Sài Gòn
Mẩu bánh sừng trăng đầu tiên rớt khỏi mặt bàn em đang ngồi
Em nghĩ, chắc là chẳng ai nghe tiếng rớt của nó, khi chạm sàn gỗ,
Nhưng đâu đó, ở một thành phố khác
Đàn kiến đội lên đầu chiếc nón Quaker
Và lên đường, thăm em giùm anh.

History
On a gray evening
Of a gray century,
I ate an apple
While no one was looking.
A small, sour apple
The color of wood fire
Which I first wiped
On my sleeve.
Then I stretched my legs
As far as they'd go,
Said to myself
Why not close my eyes now
Before the late
World News and Weather.
Charles Simic
Lịch sử
Vào một buổi chiều xám
Thế kỷ xám
Gấu xực 1 trái táo
Khi không ai nhìn
Một trái táo nhỏ
Chua ơi là chua
Màu lửa củi
Gấu lấy tay áo lau miệng
Rồi, ruỗi cẳng ra
Mặc sức chúng ruỗi
Rồi Gấu nói với Gấu
Tại sao mi không nhắm mắt lúc này
Trước bản tin trễ
Tin thế giới và thời tiết


Thơ RC rất đỗi thê lương, và nỗi cô đơn đến với chúng ta, rất đỗi bất ngờ. Trong thơ ông có nỗi buồn cháy da cháy thịt, nhưng không phải là do mất 1 người thân, thí dụ như bài sau đây, GCC thật mê.
http://www.tanvien.net/Dayly_Poems/Carver_Poems.html
I fished alone that languid
autumn evening.
Fished as darkness kept coming
on.
Experiencing exceptional loss and
then
exceptional joy when I brought a
silver salmon
to the boat, and dipped a net
under the fish.
Secret heart! When I looked into
the moving water
and up at the dark outline of the
mountains
behind the town, nothing hinted
then
I would suffer so this longing
to be back once more, before I
die.
Far from everything, and far from
myself


("Evening")
Chiều tối
Tôi câu cá 1 mình
vào buổi chiều tối mùa thu tiều tụy đó,
Cá như màn đêm cứ thế mò ra.
Cảm thấy,
mất mát ơi là mất mát
và rồi,
vui ơi là vui,
khi tóm được một chú cá hồi bạc,
mời chú lên thuyền
nhúng 1 cái lưới bên dưới chú.
Trái tim bí mật!
Khi tôi nhìn xuống làn nước xao động,
nhìn lên đường viền đen đen của rặng núi
phiá sau thành phố,
chẳng thấy gợi lên một điều gì,
và rồi
tôi mới đau đớn làm sao,
giả như sự chờ mong dài này,
lại trở lại một lần nữa,
trước khi tôi chết.
Xa cách mọi chuyện
Xa cả chính tôi.


Image may contain: outdoor, water and nature


Simic: Scribbled in the Dark


THE INFINITE

The infinite yawns and keeps yawning.
Is it sleepy?
Does it miss Pythagoras?
The sails on Columbus's three ships?
Does the sound of the surf remind it of itself?
Does it ever sit over a glass of wine
            and philosophize?
Does it peek into mirrors at night?
Does it have a suitcase full of souvenirs
            stashed away somewhere?
Does it like to lie in a hammock with the wind
            whispering sweet nothings in its ear?
Does it enter empty churches and light a single
            candle on the altar?
Does it see us as a couple of fireflies
            playing hide-and-seek in a graveyard?
Does it find us good to eat?

Vĩnh Cửu

Vĩnh Cửu ngáp và tiếp tục ngáp
Nó buồn ngủ ư?
Hay nhớ Pythagoras?
Ba con thuyền và những chuyến ra khơi của Kha Luân Bố?
Hay tiếng sóng gợi nhớ nó, về chính nó?
Nó đã từng ngồi bên 1 ly rượu vang
Và triết lý?
Đưa mắt nhìn mình, ở trong gương, vào ban đêm?
Có cái cà tạp đầy ứ kỷ niệm
Quăng ở đâu đó?
Thích nằm võng
Nghe gió thì thầm những hư vô ngọt ngào vào tai?
Vô 1 ngôi nhà thờ vắng hoe
Đốt ngọn nến cô đơn nơi bàn thờ?
Liệu nó có nhìn chúng ta như 1 cặp đom đóm
Chơi trò hú tim nơi nghĩa địa?
Hay là nó nghĩ hai đứa mình thịt ngon lắm, thử xực 1 phát xem sao?


IN SOMEONE'S BACKYARD

What a pretty sight
To see two lovers drink wine and kiss,
A dog on his hind legs
Begging for table scraps.

Ở sân sau nhà ai đó
Coi kìa, tuyệt làm sao
Cặp tình nhân, uống và hôn
Và con chó, ngồi lên chân
Chờ mẩu vụn.


THE ART OF HAPPINESS

Thanks to a stash of theatrical costumes
And their kindly owner,
An opportunity for this couple to brighten up
This dark and dreary day,

Cut a dash as they step out
Into the crowded street
Wearing powdered wigs,
Cross against the screeching traffic,
And go have lunch,
She looking like Marie Antoinette,
And he all in black,
Like her executioner or father confessor,

Watching the young French Queen
Splashing ketchup over her fries
With a wicked smile on her face,
While he struggles to balance the straw
That came with the Coke
On his nose and waits for her applause.

Nghệ thuật hạnh phúc

Nhờ giấu được những bộ đồ sân khấu
Và người chủ tốt bụng
Một cơ hội đã mở ra cho cặp vợ chồng,
Sáng hẳn lên
Hay, như Ngụy nói,
Đời lên hương
Trong một ngày âm u, ảm đạm như thế này.

Đi 1 đường huê dạng,
Và thế là cặp vợ chồng
Bèn nhập vô phố phường đông đúc
Đầu, tóc giả xịt phấn
Chúng sấn vô dòng xe cộ chát chúa
Chúng đi làm bữa trưa
Nàng, như Marie Antoinette
Chàng, đồ đen tuyền
Như tên sắp sửa chặt đầu nàng
Hay, vì linh mục xưng tội giờ phút chót.

Nàng, Nữ Hoàng Pháp trẻ măng
Chét nước cà tô mát lên mớ khoai chiên
Với nụ cười ma mị trên mặt
Trong khi chàng
Vật lộn 
Với cái ống hút
Ở trên mũi của chàng
Tới, cùng lúc với chai Cô Ca Cô La
Và đợi nàng
Ban cho 1 chầu vỗ tay!

Thơ Mỗi Ngày

Master of Disguises
Surely, he walks among us unrecognized:
Some barber, store clerk, delivery man,
Pharmacist, hairdresser, bodybuilder,
Exotic dancer, gem cutter, dog walker,
The blind beggar singing, O Lord, remember me, 
Some window decorator starting a fake fire
In a fake fireplace while mother and father watch
From the couch with their frozen smiles
As the street empties and the time comes
For the undertaker and the last waiter to head home.
O homeless old man, standing in a doorway
With your face half hidden,
I wouldn't even rule out the black cat crossing the street
The bare light bulb swinging on a wire
In a subway tunnel as the train comes to a stop.
Tổ sư Hoá trang
Hẳn rồi, hắn đi giữa chúng ta mà không ai nhận ra
Một anh thợ hớt tóc, một viên thư ký, một người giao hàng
Nhà bào chế thuốc Tây, thợ làm tóc, lực sĩ thẩm mỹ
Người khiêu vũ điệu Ba Tư, Ả rập
Thợ kim hoàn, người dẫn chó đi dạo,
Người ăn xin mù ư ử, Ôi Chúa, hãy nhớ đến tôi
Một cửa sổ trang hoàng Noel “bục” 1 phát, khởi sự đám cháy dởm
Ở một đám lửa dởm, trong lúc bà via và ông via nhìn,
Từ giường nằm, với nụ cười đóng băng
Con phố trống dần, đã tới lúc người chủ nhà hòm và tên bồi cuối cùng về nhà
Ôi tên già không nhà, đứng ở lối đi vô nhà
Với bộ mặt giấu mất một nửa,
Ta sẽ không ra lệnh cho con mèo đen vượt qua đường
Ngọn đèn nơi đường hầm lắc lư khi xe điện ngầm tới trạm
Summer Light

It likes empty churches
At the blue hour of dawn
The shadows parting
Like curtains in a sideshow, 
The eyes of the crucified
Staring down from the cross
As if seeing his bloody feet
For the very first time.
Charles Simic 
Ánh Sáng Mùa Hè
Nó thích nhà thờ trống rỗng
Vào cái giờ xanh của buổi sáng tinh mơ
Những cái bóng bỏ đi
Như những bức màn trong 1 buổi diễn phụ
Con mắt của Người bị đóng đinh
Nhìn xuống từ cây thập tự
Như thể Người nhìn thấy máu của Người
Ở chân
Lần đầu
Private Miseries
More than this crippled veteran playing the banjo,
I have no right to grumble,
More than this old woman cracking open her purse
To give him a quarter,
Lest they both take offense and beat me
On the head with one of his crutches.
My own anguish must remain unspoken,
Hidden behind a firm stride and a smile.
One day I knelt down and cursed God
For all the suffering and injustice he consents to.
Since then, I have felt even more alone.
Like a lifelong widower forever unconsoled
I pass the homeless huddled in doorways
Upon a winter morning and dare not
Grouse about my own sleepless night,
And my cold feet that make me hurry past them.
Những nỗi khốn khổ mình ên
Hơn cả cái anh cựu binh VNCH,
già què, đang từng tưng với cây đàn băng dzô
Tớ đếch có quyền càu nhàu
Hơn cả cái bà già đang cố mở bóp
lấy mấy nghìn Cụ Hồ cho ông lính Ngụy già què
Cứ để cho họ cảm thấy bị tổn thương và đập vào đầu tớ
Với một trong những cây nạng
Cái nỗi thống khổ của riêng tớ phải được nín khe,
Và được giấu ở bên dưới bước đi mạnh mẽ, và nụ cười.
Một bữa tớ quỳ xuống và nguyền rủa Thượng Đế
Về bao đau khổ và bất công mà ông ta cứ nhè tớ mà trút xuống
Kể từ đó, tớ cảm thấy cô đơn còn hơn bao giờ hết
Như một bà goá cả đời không hề được an ủi.
Tớ đi qua một đám người vô gia cư láo nháo ở hành lang
Một buổi sáng mùa đông và không dám
Càu nhàu về một đêm mất ngủ của riêng tớ
Và đôi chân lạnh giá của tớ càng khiến tớ vội vã đi qua họ 
And Who Are You, Sir?
I'm just a shuffling old man,
Ventriloquizing
For a god
Who hasn't spoken to me once.
The one with the eyes of a goat
Grazing alone
On some high mountain meadow
In the long summer dusk. 
Nhưng Ngài là Ai, hử Ngài?
Tớ chỉ là một tên già lê lết
Nói chuyện bằng bụng
Về một ông trời
Chưa từng nói với tớ một lần
Kẻ có đôi mắt dê
Thả dê một mình
Trên cánh đồng cỏ trên núi cao
Vào một hoàng hôn dài mùa hè


Charles Simic



* *

*
Trên tờ Điểm Sách của Hồng Mao, số mới nhất, có 1 bài thần sầu về Scott Fitz. Ghé tiệm tính bệ về, nhưng không đủ xu, tờ này mắc lắm, đành thua, đọc khúc free đỡ!

https://literaryreview.co.uk/tender-is-the-writer

Dịu dàng như…  [nhà văn] GCC!

Cái gì gì "nhân hậu và cảm động"!
Ôi, chưa được hôn em mà đã nhớ em những ngày ở bên kia nấm mồ rồi!

Note: Tờ Điểm Sách của đám Hồng Mao, đọc Scott Fitz nhân xb một số truyện ngắn mới kiếm thấy.
Cái tít vinh danh “Dịu Dàng Như Đêm” của chàng, và tất nhiên, như 1 phản ứng dây chuyền, vinh danh MCNK của TTT.

Bài này tuyệt quá. Cho đọc free nữa mới tuyệt làm sao.
Tin Văn còn nợ độc giả bài điểm cuốn tiểu sử Czeslaw Milosz của tờ này!
Hà, hà!

Satisfaction doesn’t come with things, however beautiful and plentiful. Tender Is the Night (1934) is, perhaps, unequal to the poetic ferocity and compression of The Great Gatsby (1925), but its sensitive hero, Dick Diver, is the most heartbreaking of Fitzgerald’s characters, a man with everything and nothing.

Dịch theo kiểu lộng dịch:

Hài lòng thì chẳng mắc mớ chi với đời, dù đời có đẹp có đầy cỡ nào. “Dịu dàng như đêm”, thì có lẽ không thể nào so với sự dữ dằn thi ca và độ nén của “Gastby vĩ đại”, nhưng nhân vật Kiệt của nó, thì mới mẫn cảm và nhức nhối làm sao, số 1 trong những nhân vật của Fitz, một kẻ với tất cả và với chẳng có cái chó gì!

"Thơ RC rất đỗi thê lương, và nỗi cô đơn đến với chúng ta, rất đỗi bất ngờ. Trong thơ ông có nỗi buồn cháy da cháy thịt, nhưng không phải là do mất 1 người thân, thí dụ như bài sau đây, GCC thật mê"
Ui chao, đúng là cái tình cảnh của Gấu bữa ở PLT, sau khi Sad Seagull bỏ đí.
Cực kỳ thê lương, cực kỳ trống rỗng.
Nhưng bằng cách nào, bà xã ông bạn Bạn, từ mãi tít xa, mấy ngã tư, mấy góc đường, lại nhìn ra, hiểu ra, và bèn thúc giục ông chồng chạy vội xe tới?

Manguel, trong Borges Yêu, giải thích:
Borges once remarked that the destiny of the modern hero is not to reach Ithaca or the Holy Grail. Perhaps his sorrow, in the end, came from realizing that instead of granting him the much-longed-for and sublime erotic encounter, his craft demanded that he fail: Beatriz was not to be Beatrice, he was not to be Dante, he was to be only Borges, a fumbling dream-lover, still unable, even in his own imagination, to conjure up the one fulfilling and almost perfect woman of his waking dreams.

Phần số của chúng ta, là không tới được Thiên Đường.
Cái sự sống sót của chúng ta, là 1 sỉ nhục tình yêu, thứ vĩ đại như K phán.
GCC cũng đã từng viết như thế, lần thoát chết mìn VC ở nhà hàng Mỹ Cảnh!

Sáng sớm hôm sau, khi chàng nhận thấy đã chống cự nổi, và thắng cả thần chết, đã lừa dối được định mệnh, đồng thời chàng cũng nhận ra một sự thật thảm thương, là sự sống sót của chàng như có một điều chi bất thường, giống như một nốt nhạc sai, dư, thừa, bất toàn, một giọng hát lạc giữa một bài ca, sự sống sót của chàng là một điều xúc phạm tới tình yêu thiêng liêng: Chàng vẫn sống và nàng đã chẳng tới được nhà thương đêm đó.
Trong khi lần hồi sống lại, trong những lần nàng vào nhà thương Grall thăm chàng, nghe nàng kể chuyện, khi được tin, nàng đã khóc và không dám giụi mắt, vì sợ mắt sẽ đỏ, và người trong nhà sẽ biết. Chàng nghe kể lại, vừa cảm động vừa hổ thẹn....
Tứ Tấu Khúc


Borges in Love 
A young woman in the audience:
"Mr. Borges, have you ever been in love?"
Borges (unhesitatingly): "Yes."
Yale University, March 1971

Jay Parini
Tender Is the Writer

Paradise Lost: A Life of F Scott Fitzgerald
By David S Brown

Harvard University Press 413pp £23.95 order from our bookshop
I’d Die for You and Other Lost Stories
By F Scott Fitzgerald (Edited by Anne Margaret Daniel)
Scribner 358pp £16.99 order from our bookshop

Literary Review - Britain's best-loved Literary Magazine

F Scott Fitzgerald is the most irresistible of modern American writers, and readers return to his pages time and again. When Paradise Lost landed on my desk for review, I had just, over the past year, read through Fitzgerald’s major novels and stories, work I’ve known and admired for half a century. But classic literature is, in Pound’s great phrase, ‘news that stays news’, and I continue to read Fitzgerald as compulsively as I read the daily headlines.
The problem with Fitzgerald has never been the work; it’s been the writing about him. The standard biography for some time has been Some Sort of Epic Grandeur, a 1981 study by Matthew J Bruccoli. It’s a reliable and boring compilation of facts, not as well written as the first major assessment of the life and work, The Far Side of Paradise by Arthur Mizener (1951). Any number of lives of Fitzgerald have appeared over the decades, but I’ve not found them satisfying, in large part because they tend to portray the author as a spokesman for the so-called Jazz Age, a drunken playboy with unresolved aspirations who embodies the empty morality of the Lost Generation. One got more by reading memoirs of the period, such as Malcolm Cowley’s haunting Exile’s Return (1934), which recalls well-known American authors in Paris in the 1920s, a kind of golden age that continues to inspire young American writers to travel abroad to seek their imaginative fortunes. Fitzgerald was hardly celebrating the lifestyles of the rich and famous. Instead, he offered a rueful and remorseless critique of that world, however much he adored it.

Fitzgerald was a good Catholic boy by training, a young man who read the Gospels and understood (though he resisted the notion, almost successfully) that it’s easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for the rich to enter heaven. His wealth-bedazzled characters, including Jay Gatsby, Amory Blaine in This Side of Paradise and Gordon Sterrett in ‘May Day’, that incomparable early masterpiece of short fiction, find little pleasure in their lives. They have swallowed a notion of the American Dream that has turned into a kaleidoscopic fantasy which tantalises but never quite resolves into a steady image. There is no fun in their yearning for something they can’t possess and that nobody can ever have. Satisfaction doesn’t come with things, however beautiful and plentiful. Tender Is the Night (1934) is, perhaps, unequal to the poetic ferocity and compression of The Great Gatsby (1925), but its sensitive hero, Dick Diver, is the most heartbreaking of Fitzgerald’s characters, a man with everything and nothing. This episodic, gorgeously written novel tracks the author’s own decline from the mid-1920s through to the Great Depression, which became an external correlative to Fitzgerald’s own spiritual (as well as financial) bankruptcy.
What I admire about Paradise Lost is that it moves well beyond the hackneyed images in which the author lives in the prison house of his own fragile dreams, a sybaritic social climber who squanders his talent by drinking. For David Brown, ‘Fitzgerald sought to record in some definite sense the history of America’, with its dream of equality and liberty for all ruined by unchecked capitalism. Brown writes: ‘The growing power of industrialists and financers offended his romantic sensibility, and he wondered if this rising republic of consumers could ever recover its old idealism.’

Paradise Lost: MCNK mà chẳng là Thiên Đàng Đã Mất ư?

Đâu chỉ Đà Lạt, mà cả Miền Nam: Thiên Đàng Đã Mất Sáng sớm hôm sau, khi chàng nhận thấy đã chống cự nổi, và thắng cả thần chết, đã lừa dối được định mệnh, đồng thời chàng cũng nhận ra một sự thật thảm thương, là sự sống sót của chàng như có một điều chi bất thường, giống như một nốt nhạc sai, dư, thừa, bất toàn, một giọng hát lạc giữa một bài ca, sự sống sót của chàng là một điều xúc phạm tới tình yêu thiêng liêng: Chàng vẫn sống và nàng đã chẳng tới được nhà thương đêm đó.
Trong khi lần hồi sống lại, trong những lần nàng vào nhà thương Grall thăm chàng, nghe nàng kể chuyện, khi được tin, nàng đã khóc và không dám giụi mắt, vì sợ mắt sẽ đỏ, và người trong nhà sẽ biết. Chàng nghe kể lại, vừa cảm động vừa hổ thẹn...

Nhớ là, cái mẩu này, đăng trên Nghệ Thuật. Một đấng bạn quí, đọc, hình như ở Quán Chùa, nhìn Gấu như nhìn 1 con quái vật. Trong MCNK, khi cô học trò Oanh thấy thầy Kiệt bịnh quá, bèn thỏ thẻ, hay là em bỏ hết, theo Thầy từ nhà thương này qua nhà thương khác, hầu hạ Thầy, Kiệt xoa tay, đừng, đừng chẳng bõ.
Cả cuốn MCNK là bài hát Chuyện Tình - bạn đọc hẳn còn nhớ, bài này có 1 thời nổi tiếng tại Sài Gòn qua giọng hát Dalida, Une histoire d’amour - được lập đi lập lại, cả 1 cuốn La Nausée là câu hát, Some of these days you’ll miss me, honey cái con mẹ gì đó! (1)
(1)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Some_of_These_Days

Ôi chao, vẫn Borges, như đã phán ở trên:
No one loses (you repeat in vain)
Except that which he doesn't have and never
Had, but it isn't sufficient to be brave
To learn the art of oblivion,
A symbol, a rose tears you apart
And a guitar can kill you.

And a guitar can kill you

Chẳng ai mất (bạn lập lại 1 cách vô ích)
Ngoại trừ cái mà bạn chẳng có, chẳng bao giờ có
Nhưng can đảm không thôi,
Không đủ
Để học nghệ thuật của sự lãng quên
Một biểu tượng, một bông hồng làm bạn tả tơi
Suốt 1 đời,
Suốt nhiều đời
Đời đời
Môt bản nhạc sến có thể giết bạn
Gấu gặp cú này rồi. Ở Đỗ Hoà, với bản Chuyện Tình Buồn (1)

(1)

http://www.tanvien.net/Al/Waiting_For_SN_1.html 

“the wet cheeks of streets gleam”

Một, trong Top Ten “Search Keyphrases", theo server.
Tò mò, Gấu gõ đầu Bác Gúc. Ra bài thơ, dưới đây.

Quái thật.

Những Top Ten thường gặp, thì cũng đã quái rồi.
"Phố vẫn hoang vu từ lúc em đi", thí dụ.
"Má ướt, ướt trăng phố", thần sầu, quá thần sầu!
Mà, thơ Adam Zagajewski nữa chứ!

Tks All


Birdsong diminishes.
The moon sits for a photo.
The wet cheeks of streets gleam.
Wind brings the scent of ripe fields.
High overhead, a small plane cavorts like a dolphin.

Adam Zagajewski

Chuyện Tình Buồn

Tiếng chim loãng dần.
Mặt trăng ngồi vào một bức hình
Má phố ướt, ánh lên ánh trăng.
Gió mang mùi lúa đang độ chín
Mãi tít phía bên trên, một cái máy bay
quẵng 1 đường,
như chú cá heo.

Cái tít “Chuyện Tình Buồn này”, thay vì “Một chuyện về nỗi cô đơn” (nguyên tác, của AZ), là do Gấu nhớ đến cô bạn, và những ngày Ðỗ Hòa.
Lần đầu tiên Gấu nghe Chuyện Tình Buồn, là ở Ðỗ Hòa, 1 buổi tối văn nghệ tổ, trong 1 lán nào đó, khi là Y Tế Ðội, và khi 1 anh tù hát lên bản này, một anh khác cầm hai cái muỗng đánh nhịp, Gấu bèn nhớ ra liền buổi tối mò đến thăm em, đứng tít mãi bên ngoài, trong bóng tối nhìn vô căn nhà cũ, em thì đã lấy chồng, có đến mấy nhóc:

Anh một đời rong ruổi
Em tay bế tay bồng

Bèn lủi thủi ra về. Trưa hôm sau, bị tó ở bên Thủ Thiêm, đưa vô trường Phục Hồi Nhân Phẩm, Bình Triệu, vừa hết cữ vã, là xin đi lao động Ðỗ Hòa liền, hy vọng trốn Trại, kịp chuyến vượt biên đường Kampuchia.



*


*

Playboy June 2016


Tribute to Liu Xiaobo


Nếu chỉ đọc một bài về Lưu Hiểu Ba thì có lẽ bài này là đáng đọc nhất.
"Không rõ vì sao, trong những tuần cuối đời, ông Lưu đã đồng ý từ bỏ mong muốn ở lại Trung Quốc mặc dù ông vẫn luôn không ngừng từ chối cuộc đời bên lề mà việc lưu vong tất yếu sẽ mang lại; có lẽ ông muốn dùng sức lực cuối cùng để giúp người vợ phải chịu khổ từ lâu là bà Lưu Hà và em trai bà, ông Lưu Huy, ra khỏi Trung Quốc. Nhưng suy nghĩ của những kẻ bắt giam ông thì không thể rõ ràng hơn: nó chẳng hề liên quan đến việc chăm sóc y tế mà là ngăn Lưu Hiểu Ba nói lên suy nghĩ của mình một lần cuối. Ông suy nghĩ gì trong tám năm tù? Ông đã thấy trước điều gì cho một thế giới mà nền độc tài cộng sản của Trung Quốc vẫn tiếp tục lớn mạnh?
Note: Bài viết hay nhất về Liu theo GCC, có lẽ là bài của Simon Leys, Tin Văn đã từng giới thiệu, ngay khi bài viết xuất hiện trên NYRB.
Tuy nhiên, khi ông mất, đúng vào lúc 1 vị sống sót Lò Thiêu, là Simone Veil mất - hãy nhớ sự kiện này, Liu tự coi mình là kẻ sống sót Tận Thế - chúng ta thử so sánh giữa hai người, là Liu và Veil, cùng lúc, đọc bài viết của tờ Người Kinh Tế, coi ông là lương tâm của TQ, và so sánh ông, không phải với "thất bại", thí dụ như Bà Miến Điện, mà là “thành công”, mà tờ Người Kinh Tế để kế ông, là Sakharov và Mandela.

Từ đó, là 1 vấn đề cực căng: Tại sao Liu thất bại?

Ông ta nói sự thực về Chế Độ Bạo Chúa Tẫu

 *
NYRB Feb 9, 2012
Ông ta nói sự thực về “Bạo Chúa Tẫu”.
Bài viết này bảnh lắm. Simon Leys là 1 chuyên gia về xứ Tầu.
TV sẽ chuyển ngữ.
Cũng là 1 cách tự hỏi, sao Tẫu có một Liu Xiaobo, thí dụ, mà Mít chẳng bao giờ có?
Miến có Nobel Hòa Bình. Tẫu cũng có Nobel Hòa Bình.
Mít “cũng” có Nobel…. Toán.
Mít [Bắc Kít, đúng hơn] giỏi tính hơn họ

Image may contain: 2 people, people standing, ocean, child, outdoor and water


http://www.tanvien.net/Dayly_Poems/Liu_Xiaobo_Elegies.html
Bi Khúc 4 Tháng Sáu
Foreword
As a firm believer in nonviolence, freedom, and democratic values, I have supported the nonviolent democracy movement in China from its beginning. One of the most encouraging and moving events in recent Chinese history was the democracy movement of 1989, when Chinese brothers and sisters demonstrated openly and peacefully their yearning for freedom, democracy, and human dignity. They embraced nonviolence in a most impressive way, clearly reflecting the values their movement sought to assert.
The Chinese leadership's response to the peaceful demonstrations of 1989 was both inappropriate and unfortunate. Brute force, no matter how powerful, can never subdue the basic human desire for freedom, whether it is expressed by Chinese democrats and farmers or the people of Tibet.
In 2008, I was personally moved as well as encouraged when hundreds of Chinese intellectuals and concerned citizens inspired by Liu Xiaobo signed Charter 08, calling for democracy and freedom in China. I expressed my admiration for their courage and their goals in a public statement, two days after it was released. The international community also recognized Liu Xiaobo's valuable contribution in urging China to take steps toward political, legal, and constitutional reforms by supporting the award of the Nobel Peace Prize to him in 2010.
It is ironic that today, while the Chinese government is very concerned to be seen as a leading world power, many Chinese people from all walks of life continue to be deprived of their basic rights. In this collection of poems entitled June Fourth Elegies, Liu Xiaobo pays a moving tribute to the sacrifices made during the events in Tiananmen Square in 1989. Considering the writer himself remains imprisoned, this book serves as a powerful reminder of his courage and determination and his great-hearted concern for the welfare of his fellow countrymen and women.
HIS HOLINESS THE FOURTEENTH DALAI LAMA, TENZIN GYATSO
September 3, 2011
Là một người vững tin vào bất bạo động, tự do và những giá trị dân chủ, tôi hỗ trợ phong trào dân chủ bất bạo động ở TQ kể từ lúc khởi đầu của nó. Một trong những sự kiện phấn khởi, cảm động nhất trong lịch sử gần đây của TQ là cuộc vận động 1989, khi anh chị em TQ diễn hành công khai và ôn hòa đòi hỏi tự do, dân chủ và phẩm giá con người. Họ ôm lấy bất bạo động trong một cung cách ấn tượng nhất, phản ảnh rõ ràng những giá trị mà phong trào mong tìm đạt được.
Nhà cầm quyền TQ, và cách đối xử của họ đối với những cuộc biểu tình 1989 thì vừa không thích hợp, vừa đáng tiếc. Sức mạnh cục súc, dù mãnh liệt cỡ nào, thì cũng không bao giờ làm khuất phục ao ước cơ bản của con người cho tự do, hoặc được diễn tả bởi những nhà dân chủ và những chủ đất, chủ trại người TQ, hay người dân Tây Tạng.
Vào năm 2008, cá nhân tôi cảm thấy vừa cảm động, vừa hứng khởi khi hàng trăm trí thức và công dân TQ quan tâm, được tạo hứng bởi Liu Xiaobo, đã ký tên nơi Hiến Chương 08, kêu gọi dân chủ và tự do cho TQ. Tôi biểu lộ lòng kính mến và ái mộ của mình trước sự can đảm và những mục tiêu đòi hỏi của họ, trong phát biểu công khai trước công chúng, hai ngày sau khi Hiến Chương được công bố. Cộng đồng thế giới còn thừa nhận đóng góp quí giá của Liu Xiaobo trong việc đòi hỏi TQ tạo những bước tiến trong việc cải cách chính trị, luật pháp, và định chế, bằng cách hỗ trợ, và mừng rỡ, khi ông được trao giải thưởng Nobel Hòa Bình vào năm 2010. 
Một điều trớ trêu, là, vào ngày này, trong khi chính quyền TQ rất quan tâm tới việc làm thế nào để TQ được coi như là một cường quốc trên thế giới, thì chính cường quốc mong được cả thế giới công nhận đó, lại đối xử cực kỳ tàn nhẫn với dân chúng của họ, bằng cách tước đoạt hết của họ những quyền cơ bản của con người. Trong tập thơ Bi Khúc Tháng Sáu Ngày Bốn, Liu Xiaobo tưởng niệm, vinh danh những hy sinh, mất mát xẩy ra trong những biến động ở Công Trường Thiên An Môn 1989. Trong khi nhà văn, nhà thơ, vào chính lúc này, vẫn còn đang ngồi tù, thì tập thơ quả đúng là một nhắc nhở mãnh liệt về sự can đảm, quyết tâm, và sự quan tâm bằng trái tim lớn nóng hổi của ông, dành cho xứ sở và đồng bào của mình.
DALAI LAMA

Tưởng Niệm Simone Veil, 1927-2017
"J'ai depuis longtemps dépassé l'idée d'immortalité dans la mesure où je suis déjà un peu morte dans les camps"
Tôi đã từ lâu vượt cõi bất tử, trong cái chừng mực, một phần ở trong tôi, đã chết ở Lò Thiêu.
Image may contain: 5 people, people smiling, outdoor and text

En avril 2013, à la veille de son départ pour Pékin, François Hollande réunit à l’Elysée une vingtaine de personnalités françaises familières des relations franco-chinoises dans tous les domaines, afin d’entendre leurs conseils sur la meilleure manière d’aborder son premier déplacement officiel – et premier voyage tout court – en Chine.
Vers la fin de la rencontre, le président socialiste pose de lui-même une question : "Pensez-vous que je doive citer publiquement le nom de Liu Xiaobo pendant ma visite ?"
On connait la suite : au cours de sa visite, François Hollande ne cita pas le nom du Prix Nobel de la paix 2010, mort jeudi d’un cancer du foie diagnostiqué alors qu’il était en prison depuis 2008 ; et s’il aborda son sort lors des entretiens avec ses interlocuteurs chinois, rien ne devait filtrer.
Le président français renonça ainsi à imiter son seul prédécesseur socialiste, François Mitterrand, qui, lors d’un dîner officiel au Kremlin en 1984, osa prononcer le nom du dissident Andrei Sakharov dans son toast devant le numéro un soviétique d’alors, Konstantin Tchernenko, lequel blêmit. "Mitterrand se rassoit dans un silence de mort. Tous les hiérarques médaillés piquent du nez, chacun dans son assiette", raconte Jack Lang dans un livre consacré à François Mitterrand, "Fragments de vie partagée" (Seuil).
[Obs net]
Cựu tông tông Tẩy, François Hollande đã từng không dám nêu tên Liu, lần viếng thăm TQ, trong khi tiền nhiệm ông, là François Mitterrand, thì lại dám nhắc tên Sakharov khi thăm Nga!

SN_GCC_2017


Grandpa's Spells
I hate to hear birds sing
Come spring, the wood turn green
And little flowers sprout
Along the country roads.

Bleak skies, short days,
And long nights please me best.
I like to cloister myself
Watching my thoughts roam

Like a homeless family
Holding on to their children
And their few possessions
Seeking shelter for the night.

And I love most of all knowing
I'm here today, gone tomorrow,
The dark sneaking up on me,
To blowout the match in my hand.

Charles Simic: New and Selected Poems (1962-2012)

Thần Chú của Gấu Già

Gấu ghét chim hót đón chào mùa xuân
Rừng trở nên xanh lá
Và hoa hiếc nở lôm côm ven đường làng

Bầu trời âm u, ngày ngắn
Và đêm dài
Là Gấu khoái nhất
Gấu thích tự giam mình, theo cái kiểu tu kín
Ngắm tư tưởng của Gấu lang thang

Như 1 gia đình không nhà
Cố bám con cái và ba thứ đồ lỉnh kỉnh nồi niêu xoong chảo của họ
Trong khi kiếm nơi trú ẩn trong đêm

Gấu mê nhất trong mọi thứ mà Gấu mê
Là biết mình có hôm nay, là để “mai anh đi rồi”!
Đêm đen lậm mãi vào trong Gấu
Cái gì gì, khi anh đi anh đi vào sương đen
Sương rất độc tẩm vào người nỗi chết.
[Cái này thuổng ông anh nhà thơ TTT]
Và thổi tắt mẹ cây đèn cầy Gấu cầm trong tay!



tt  
    Lê Minh Hà & Thảo Trần
    [Đức quốc,
cuối thế kỷ, 1999]

*

When You are Old
When you are old and grey and full of sleep,
And nodding by the fire, take down this book,
And slowly read, and dream of the soft look
Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep;
How many loved your moments of glad grace,
And loved your beauty with love false or true,
But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you,
And loved the sorrows of your changing face;
And bending down beside the glowing bars,
Murmur, a little sadly, how Love fled       
And paced upon the mountains overhead
And hid his face amid a crowd of stars.
W.B. Yeats: The Collected Poems, ed by Richard J. Finneran
Khi Em của Gấu già
Khi Em của Gấu già, tóc xám, lúc nào cũng thèm ngủ
Ngồi gật gù bên bếp lửa, và bèn lôi cuốn Istanbul ra
Đọc từ từ, mơ ánh mắt dịu dàng và những bóng huyền sâu thẳm của chúng
Ánh mắt thời Em của Gấu còn đương thời
Ôi chao, bao nhiêu tên đã yêu những khoảnh khắc ân sủng đó
Và yêu vẻ đẹp của Em, với tình yêu, giả hay thực
Nhưng chỉ có một thằng cha Gấu
Là cực mê những nét buồn trên khuôn mặt thay đổi của Em thôi!
Và cúi đầu bên thành giường sáng ngời
Thì thầm, hơi có tí buồn,
Như thế nào, Gấu bỏ chạy
Lên những ngọn đỉnh trời,
Giấu mặt giữa những chùm sao
Chưa kể lần xém chết,
Giữa những pho tượng Phước Lộc Thọ.
Nothing Else
Friends of the small hours of the night:
Stub of a pencil, small notebook,
Reading lamp on the table,
Making me welcome in your circle of light.
I care little the house is dark and cold
With you sharing my absorption
In this book in which now and then a sentence
Is worth repeating in a whisper.
Without you, there'd be only my pale face
Reflected in the black windowpane,
And the bare trees and deep snow
Wailing for me out there in the dark.
H/A thôi, đủ rồi
Bạn của những giờ nhỏ trong đêm:
Mẩu viết chì, cuốn sổ nhỏ
Đèn bàn
Chúng chào anh khi nhập vô vòng ánh sáng quanh em
Anh không để ý gì nhiều về căn nhà thì tối và lạnh
Với em cùng nhập vô cuốn sách
Lúc này, hay lúc nọ, một câu văn
Thì thật đáng lập lại trong lời thầm
Không có em, sẽ chỉ có bộ mặt lợt lạt của anh
Phản chiếu trong khung cửa tối
Và cây trần, tuyết sâu
Đợi anh ở bên ngoài, trong bóng đêm.


*

Ancient Autumn
Is that foolish youth still sawing
The good branch he's sitting on?
Do the hills wheeze like old men
And the few remaining apples sway?
Can he see the village in the valley
The way a chicken hawk would?
Already smoke rises over the roofs,
The days are getting short and chilly.
Even he must rest from time to time,
So he's lit a long-stemmed pipe
To watch a chimneysweep at work
And a woman pin diapers on the line
And then step behind some bushes,
Hike her skirt so her bare ass shows
While on the common humpbacked men
Roll a barrel of hard cider or beer,
And still beyond, past grazing cattle,
Children play soldier and march in step.
He thinks, if the wind changes direction,
He'll hear them shouting commands,
But it doesn't, so the black horseman
On the cobbled road remains inaudible.
One instant he's coming his way,
In the next he appears to be leaving in a hurry ...
It's such scenes with their air of menace,
That make him muddled in the head.
He's not even aware that he has resumed sawing,
That the big red sun is about to set.
Charles Simic
Thu Cũ
Liệu cái tuổi trẻ khùng điên ba trợn vưỡn kưa kưa
Cái cành cây bảnh nhất anh đang ngồi?
Những ngọn đồi vưỡn khò khè như những ông già
Và mấy cây táo còn lại, vưỡn “nắc nư”?
Liệu anh có thể nhìn ngôi làng ở bên dưới thung lũng
Vưỡn cái nhìn của con chim ưng thèm gà con?
Khói đã bốc lên từ những mái nhà
Ngày mới ngắn và lạnh làm sao
Ngay cả như thế thì anh vưỡn thèm ngồi lại
Thì cũng phải nghỉ ngơi, lúc này lúc nọ
Và thế là anh lấy cái tẩu dài thòng ra
Và đốt thuốc
Trong khi nhìn một tay thông ống khói làm việc
Và 1 người đàn bà treo mấy cái tã con nít lên sợi dây
Và rồi lui lại, sau mấy bụi cây
Kéo cái váy lên, phô cái chảo trắng ngần ra
Trong khi ở chỗ công cộng những người đàn ông gù
Vần 1 cái thùng tô nô rượu táo, thứ nặng đô, hay là bia
Và vẫn quá, quá bầy trâu bò gặm cỏ
Lũ con nít chơi trò lính tráng, xếp hàng diễn hành
Anh nghĩ, nếu ngọn gió đổi chiều
Thì có thể nghe chúng hô, Bác Hồ muôn năm, một, hai, một, hai
Nhưng gió không làm cái chuyện bậy bạ như thế
Và thế là người kỵ sĩ đen
Trên con lộ sỏi
Không làm sao nghe được
Trong 1 thoáng, người kỵ sĩ đi theo con đường của anh ta
Trong thoáng kế, anh ta có vẻ bỏ đi trong vội vã
Những xen như thế thật đe dọa
Khiến cho anh mụ cái đầu
Anh cũng chẳng nhận ra là mình lại tiếp tục kưa kưa
Và cái ông mặt trời đỏ bự thì đang tính đi ngủ.


Austerities
From the heel
Of a half-loaf
Of black bread,
They made a child's head.
Child, they said,
We've nothing for eyes,
Nothing to spare for ears
And nose.
Just a knife
To make a slit
Where your mouth
Ought to be.
You can grin,
You can eat,
Spit the crumbs
Into our faces.

Khổ hạnh
Từ 1 tí đầu thừa đuôi thẹo
Của một nửa lát bánh mì đen
Chúng làm nên cái đầu đứa bé
Nè, thằng bé, chúng nói
Chúng ta chẳng còn gì để làm hai con mắt
Cũng chẳng còn gì cho hai cái tai
Và cái mũi
Chỉ còn lát dao
Để đi 1 đường
Làm thành cái miệng của mi
Mi có thể méo xệch nó 1 phát
Mi có thể ăn
Và nhổ mấy mẩu vụn
Vào mặt chúng ta

The city had fallen. We came to the window of a house drawn by a madman. The setting sun shone on a few abandoned machines of futility. "I remember," someone said, "how in ancient times one could turn a wolf into a human and then lecture it to one's heart's content."

Charles Simic: New and Selected Poems (1962-2012)

Simic: Scribbled in the Dark

Thơ Mỗi Ngày
No automatic alt text available.


Apollinaire

Ta đã hái nhành lá cây thạch thảo
Em nhớ cho mùa thu đã chết rồi


L’adieu

J'ai cueilli ce brin de bruyère
L'automne est morte souviens-t'en
Nous ne nous verrons plus sur terre
Odeur du temps brin de bruyère
Et souviens-toi que je t'attends


Và nhớ nhé ta đợi chờ em đó

Bài thơ vỏn vẹn chỉ có năm câu. Năm câu phiêu hốt mang thiên nhiên nằm giữa nền thi ca Tây Phương Hiện Đại – năm câu cũng đồ sộ như toàn khối Đường Thi Trung Hoa hay mấy vần tứ tuyệt của một Thôi Hộ.

Ta đã hái nhành lá cây thạch thảo
Em nhớ cho mùa thu đã chết rồi
Chúng ta sẽ không tao phùng được nữa
Mộng trùng lai không có ở trên đời
Hương thời gian mùi thạch thảo bốc hơi
Và nhớ nhé ta đợi chờ em đó…


Dịch làm sáu câu, tôi có phần áy náy. Nhưng không biết phải làm sao. Cái chất đạm nhiên bát ngát trong thơ Apollinaire đang trừ khử mọi lối dịch diễn dịch di, dịch tinh, dịch thể.
Cứ thử liều một trận xem sao.

Ta đã hái nhành lá cây thạch thảo
Em nhớ cho, mùa thu đã chết rồi
Chúng ta sẽ chẳng nhìn nhau trên đất nữa
Hương thời gian nhành thạch thảo tí hon
Và nhớ nhé ta đợi chờ em nhé…


Cũng tạm gọi là được.
Nếu ta đem bài thơ bát ngát kia đặt vào giữa nguồn thơ mênh mông của Apollinaire ắt ta dám dịch nó ra làm lục bát Huy Cận, lục bát Nguyễn Du, hoặc thất ngôn Du Nguyễn

Đã hái nhánh kia một buổi nào
Ngậm ngùi thạch thảo chết từ bao
Thu còn sống sót đâu chăng nữa
Người sẽ xa nhau suốt điệu chào


Anh nhớ em quên và em cũng
Quên rồi khoảnh khắc rộng xuân xanh
Thời gian đất nhạt mờ năm tháng
Tuế nguyệt ta đà nhị hoán tam


Dịch như thế là diễn giải một mùi hương ẩn tàng trong nếp gấp. Nhưng đâu có cần gì.
Nếu như cần thì tớ cứ buông bừa bút mực viết bừa thơ.

Mùa thu chết liễu nhớ chăng em?
Đã chết xuân xanh suốt bóng thềm
Đất lạnh quy hồi thôi hết dịp
Chờ nhau trong Vĩnh Viễn Nguôi Quên


Thấp thoáng thiều quang mỏng mảnh dường
Nhành hoang thạch thảo ngậm ngùi vương
Chờ nhau chin kiếp tam sinh tại
Thạch thượng khê đầu nguyệt điểu mang


Xa nhau trùng điệp quan san
Một lần ly biệt nhuộm vàng cỏ cây
Mùi hương tuế nguyệt bên ngày
Phù du như mộng liễu dài như mơ


Nét my sầu toả hai bờ
Ai về cố quận ai ngờ ai đi
Tôi hồi tưởng lại thanh kỳ
Tuổi thơ giọt nước lương thì ngủ yên


Dịch ra như vậy thì tiếp giáp với bài thơ “Je me souviens”:

Je me souviens de mon enfance
Eau qui dormait dans un verre
Autant de tempêtes l’espérance
Je me souviens de mon enfance


Tôi hồi tưởng tuổi thơ ngày trước
Đáy ly nào giọt nước ngủ yên
Trước khi rông bão muộn phiền
Dậy cơn hy vọng cuối miền thơ ngây


Je songe aux métamorphoses
Qui s’épanouissent dans un verre
Comme l’espoir et la tristesse
Je songe aux métamorphoses
C’est ma destinée que je lis
Dans les reflets incertains
Les jeux sont faits rien ne va plus
C’est ma destinée que je lis


Tôi nghĩ tới tháng ngày chuyển dịch
Những thay hình đổi dạng mở phơi
Trong ly nước mộng tuyệt vời
Với sầu dao động với đời giao thoa
Linh hồn định mệnh âm ba
Bóng vang khép mở đầu hoa mơ hồ
Hỡi ơi dâu biển xô bồ
Hồn trong định mệnh bây giờ đọc ra


(Sương Bình Nguyên)
GUILLAME APOLLINAIRE (1880-1918)
The Farewell
I picked this fragile sprig of heather
Autumn has died long since remember
Never again shall we see one another
Odor of time sprig of heather
Remember I await our time together
Translated from the French by Roger Shattuck
Time of Grief
J'ai cueilli ce brin de bruyère
L'automne est morte souviens-t'en
Nous ne nous verrons plus sur terre
Odeur du temps brin de bruyère
Et souviens-toi que je t'attends
Lời vĩnh biệt
(1)
Ta đã hái nhành lá cây thạch thảo
Em nhớ cho, mùa thu đã chết rồi
Chúng ta sẽ không tao phùng được nữa
Mộng trùng lai không có ở trên đời
Hương thời gian mùi thạch thảo bốc hơi
Và nhớ nhé ta đợi chờ em đó ...
(2)
Ðã hái nhành kia một buổi nào
Ngậm ngùi thạch thảo chết từ bao
Thu còn sống sót đâu chăng nữa
Người sẽ xa nhau suốt điệu chào
Anh nhớ em quên và em cũng
Quên rồi khoảnh khắc rộng xuân xanh
Thời gian đất nhạt mờ năm tháng
Tuế nguyệt hoa đà nhị hoán tam
(3)
Mùa thu chiết liễu nhớ chăng em ?
Ðã chết xuân xanh suốt bóng thềm
Ðất lạnh qui hồi thôi hết dịp
Chờ nhau trong Vĩnh Viễn Nguôi Quên
Thấp thoáng thiều quang mỏng mảnh dường
Nhành hoang thạch thảo ngậm mùi vương
Chờ nhau chín kiếp tam sinh tại
Thạch thượng khuê đầu nguyệt diểu mang
Xa nhau trùng điệp quan san
Một lần ly biệt nhuộm vàng cỏ cây
Mùi hương tuế nguyệt bên ngày
Phù du như mộng liễu dài như mơ
Nét mi sầu tỏa hai bờ
Ai về cố quận ai ngờ ai đi
Tôi hồi tưởng lại thanh kỳ
Tuổi thơ giọt nước lương thì ngủ yên
Bùi Giáng (1925-1998) dịch
(Ði vào cõi thơ, tr 80-82, Ca Dao xuất bản, Sài Gòn, Việt Nam)
Nguồn

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

TDT

Hoàng Hạc Lâu

Bi Khúc