Primo Levi



Một sự hiếp đáp có tên là Kafka
Tam sinh vạn vật.

 
What If?
By Anita Desai

Đây có phải một người?

Levi by Partisan Review

Dịch K




Primo Levi Page




Mission Impossible

The perils of translating Primo Levi
http://harpers.org/blog/2015/12/mission-impossible/ Years ago, browsing in a Roman bookstore, I bought an Italian translation of Lolita, bound in green pleather. It seemed, as I flipped through it, like a pretty decent job, capturing at least some of the author’s suavity and syntactical brio. Then I came to the scene where the inept, pistol-packing narrator finally hits Clare Quilty with a bullet, and his victim leaps from his chair like (as Nabokov originally put it) “old, gray, mad Nijinski, like Old Faithful.” The translator got the basics down just fine—but in a footnote, he helpfully elucidated the meaning of Old Faithful for his Italian readers: “A name used by Americans for a certain type of airplane.”
I bring this up not to ridicule the translator, who certainly had his work cut out for him. What I mean to stress is that translation is a perfectionist’s nightmare—a process almost diabolically engineered to generate mistakes. Translators have too much to do at once. They are literalists, chained to the dictionary, and poets, slipping the shackles of exactitude at every opportunity. They are dual nationals of a kind, declaring their loyalty to one language while treacherously dallying with another. They transport the biggest possible things—meaning, feeling, art, ethics—in the smallest possible containers, and inevitably there is some spillage along the way.
Primo Levi was well aware of these rigors, having produced Italian versions of Claude Levi-Strauss’s The View from Afar and Franz Kafka’s The Trial. (Regarding his struggle with poor, persecuted Josef K., he wrote, “I emerged from this translation as if from an illness.”) So it should surprise nobody that The Complete Works of Primo Levi, a 3,008-page leviathan just published by Liveright, includes a smattering of mistakes. Having done the honors myself on seven Italian books, I blanch at what might emerge from a careful scrutiny of those doubtless error-flecked texts. But here as elsewhere, our mistakes can be as illuminating as our triumphs—especially the squishy ones, neither completely wrong nor completely right, which tend to take us down a variety of cultural and linguistic rabbit holes.
In the first chapter in The Periodic Table, for example, Levi discusses his Italian-Jewish ancestry. He concludes with a description of his boyhood visits to his grandmother, who always presented him with a decayed, inedible chocolate. Ann Goldstein, whose translation appears in the Complete Works, calls the chocolate “moth-eaten,” while Raymond Rosenthal, whose 1984 version introduced Levi to many American readers, opts for “worm-eaten.” Which is it?
Some might call this entomological hairsplitting. Not, I would argue, Levi, who was fascinated by such details and devoted entire essays to beetles, butterflies, crickets, fleas, and other insects. The word in Italian is tarlato, whose most literal meaning is “worm-eaten”—it’s derived from tarlo, meaning a woodworm. And the woodworm seems to have been a strikingly resonant creature for Levi. In The Search for Roots, he described himself (with dubious accuracy) as an intellectual stay-at-home, most comfortable on familiar terrain, and went on to declare: “I prefer to play it safe, to make a hole and then gnaw away inside for a long time, maybe for all one’s life, like the woodworm when he has found a piece of wood to his liking.” Elsewhere, in The Drowned and the Saved, the common pest becomes a figure for a bad conscience, for survivor’s guilt. The thought that we may have usurped another human being is a “supposition, but it gnaws at you; it’s nesting deep inside, like a worm.” (Michael F. Moore, who translated the version in the Complete Works, uses the more generic term, but the Italian word in the original text is tarlo.) It doesn’t seem like a word Levi would use casually, even in its derivative form, all of which argues for Rosenthal’s version.
Wait, I hear you saying. The woodworm eats timber, furniture, fencing, plywood—but not moldering pieces of chocolate. Isn’t Goldstein right after all? Maybe. The pest in Nona Màlia’s cupboard was likely an Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, which does indeed dine on such foodstuffs as chocolate. Game, set, match! But wait again: it is not the moth itself that consumes these delights, but the icky-looking larvae, wingless and persuasively wormlike. Well, let’s call this one a draw.
“Chromium,” from the same book, offers another example—not so much a mistake as a small, insoluble dilemma. Recalling one of his early industrial gigs, Levi describes chemical analysis as a sort of gladiatorial contest between man and matter: the adversary is “the non-me, the Big Curve, Hyle.” Now, hyle, an ancient Greek word for primordial stuff, is not exactly common but long since naturalized in English. But what the hell did Levi mean by the Big Curve? In Italian, he used the phrase il Gran Curvo, so Goldstein’s translation was literally correct, but still puzzling. A brief session with Google clarified nothing. Was the author referring to a certain portion of the Palmetto Expressway near Miami Lakes, Florida, or to those berry-and-cream-swirl-colored bowling balls you can order online? Neither. When I consulted Rosenthal’s version, I saw that he had translated the phrase as “the Button Molder,” and added a footnote: “A character in Ibsen’s Peer Gynt.”
This solved some problems while creating others. Levi was indeed referring to a character in Peer Gynt—but not to the Button Molder (whoops). He meant what is usually called the Great Boyg, a monster encountered in the wilderness by the play’s titular hero. The creature is formless, foggy, menacing, and responds to Peer Gynt’s provocations with riddling ease: “The Great Boyg conquers, but does not fight.” Now, here is where things get complicated. Boyg, meaning an amorphous obstacle, has also been absorbed into English. But it comes from a Norwegian word meaning “to bend,” which explains why in Italian, anyway, Ibsen’s misty monster has become strangely curvaceous. What is the translator to do? Respect Levi’s original formulation, as Goldstein has done, or use the accurate but opaque Boyg? And in either case, should the reader be given a leg up via a footnote or artfully inserted parenthetical by the translator, or is that messing with the purity of what Italo Calvino called the author’s “most Primo-Levian book”?
I’ll conclude with one final example: an actual mistake. Stuart Woolf translated If This Is a Man during many long, whiskey-fueled sessions with the author. For that reason, the book was not retranslated from scratch for the Complete Works, but corrected by the original translator. Most of Woolf’s fixes make complete sense: the language is more colloquial, more precise. But in at least one case, he has introduced a blooper. Describing Auschwitz just moments before an Allied bombardment, Levi writes: “In the distance photoelectric beams were visible.” This makes no sense at all. (For starters, most of the photoelectric beams used in security and manufacturing systems are infrared, and therefore not visible.) And indeed, in Woolf’s original 1958 translation, the sentence reads: “One could see the searchlight beams in the distance.”
So what happened? Woolf clearly went back to the Italian text, encountered the word fotoelettrici, and set out to sharpen his earlier, fuzzier formulation. The problem is that Levi meant something else: a fotoelettrica is a searchlight mounted on a military vehicle, and that’s clearly what the Germans would have been pointing up at the distant Allied bombers. It’s an obscure term, a piece of military jargon, and since Levi incorrectly assigned it a masculine gender, he mussed the trail for any future translator. So Woolf got lucky: he can blame the author.
And so it goes. Goldstein is a superb translator, who has brought Elena Ferrante to the English-speaking multitudes (not to mention another favorite of mine, the brilliant miniaturist Aldo Buzzi). Woolf’s version of If This Is a Man is essentially a collaboration with the author. No matter. The problems, the potholes, the pratfalls, are baked into the very process of translation. The original text is a kind of Boyg itself, a formless foe that resists any attempt to subdue it completely. Indeed, Peer Gynt’s cries of frustration will sound familiar to any longtime translator:
Backwards or forwards it’s just as far,
out or in, it’s just as narrow.
He’s here, he’s there, he’s all about me!
When I’m sure that I’m out, then I’m back in the middle!
I have had many of those claustrophobic, tongue-tied moments myself—when the English words seem to float just tantalizingly out of reach. (I’m still losing sleep over a foul-mouthed phrase of Oriana Fallaci’s, cazzo d’un cazzo stracazzo, which the author was very proud to have added to the Italian language.) Luckily, however, there is one last resort when it comes to conquering the Boyg, unknown to Ibsen’s knight errant. It’s called a deadline.

Reviews — From the December 2015 issue

Free but not Redeemed
Primo Levi and the enigma of survival

http://harpers.org/archive/2015/12/free-but-not-redeemed/


Note: Bài này tuyệt lắm. Người viết là Trùm tờ Harper's, chuyên gia về tiếng Ý, đã từng được giải thưởng dịch thuật. Cái tít mới chướng, mới gây sự làm sao, free, có giấy ra trại [Lò Thiêu, Lò Cải Tạo], nhưng chưa được cứu rỗi.
Cho đọc free.
GCC mua tờ báo rồi mới biết!

How Did Primo Levi Die?: An Exchange

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2015/12/17/how-did-he-primo-levi-exchange/

Carolyn Lieberg, reply by Tim Parks   
December 17, 2015 Issue
In response to:
The Mystery of Primo Levi from the November 5, 2015 issue

*

Primo Levi, Turin, 1985; photograph by René Burri
Magnum Photos
To the Editors:

Tim Parks’s engaging review of The Complete Works of Primo Levi [NYR, November 5] is satisfying on a number of levels, but I was disheartened to see the piece bookended by the “suicide.” Parks’s phrase that Levi “threw himself down the stairwell to his death” is not, in any case, an accurate way to describe a tumble over a railing. But the larger issue is that thoughtful and important people close to Levi, who first thought it was a suicide, have reconsidered the event. These people include his cardiologist and friend David Mendel, his lifelong friend Nobel laureate Rita Levi Montalcini, and Fernando Camon. Levi was in a whirl of activities—he’d scheduled an interview for the following Monday, he was considering the presidency of the publishing house Einaudi, he’d just submitted a novel, and that very morning he mailed a plan-filled letter. Add to that the tight dimensions of the stairwell, a railing lower than his waist, recovery from surgery (lowered blood pressure), the number of people who survived Auschwitz and did not kill themselves, and a number of other factors, and the suicide doesn’t make sense.

It has been a useful symbol for critics and other writers to hold on to as they imagine the why and how, but it is grossly unfair to the man and to his work. If this crutch is removed, his material can be examined in fresh light—an examination that he deserves.

I hope the editors of The New York Review will help discourage the story, which, in the cycling of Internet sites, already holds a terrifically strong grip. I would strongly urge you to see this 1999 essay, “Primo Levi’s Last Moments” by Diego Gambetta.

Carolyn Lieberg
Washington, D.C.
Tim Parks replies:

“1987—April 11: Levi dies, a suicide, in his apartment building in Turin.”

I quote not from a rogue website but from the author chronology provided in The Complete Works of Primo Levi, the book under review. These words, in turn, are a translation of the chronology prepared by Il Centro Internazionale di Studi Primo Levi in Turin, the most authoritative source of information on Levi; they were actually written by Ernesto Ferrero, for many years Levi’s editor at Einaudi, a close friend who knew the author well and spoke to him regularly right through to the end.

The three biographers—Ian Thomson, Carole Angiers, and Myriam Annissimov—who worked intensely on Levi’s life, interviewing most of those who knew him, all speak of his suicide as fact. The police on the scene concluded that the death could only have been suicide, this for the simple reason that one does not take a “tumble over a railing” in a Turin apartment block. The Turin law court that heard the evidence surrounding the death agreed and gave its verdict accordingly. In any event it is unthinkable that Levi, a cautious man, would have brought up children and maintained his infirm mother in a building where one could simply tumble over bannisters.

Diego Gambetta’s Boston Review article, to which Carolyn Lieberg refers me, is an extended exercise in wishful thinking, sometimes disingenuous (as when it claims, for example, that the biographies do not back up their claim that the death was suicide, or omits to mention the family’s immediate acceptance of the suicide verdict, or suggests that the height of the railing was abnormally low), sometimes plain wrong, as when it claims that Levi never wrote in favor of suicide. In the story “Heading West” (published in 1971, but interestingly republished shortly before the suicide in 1987), he sympathetically describes a remote tribe who refuse a drug that will put an end to an epidemic of suicides. The chief of the tribe writes, and they are the final words of the story, that the tribe’s members “prefer freedom to drugs, and death to illusion.” Freedom is always a positive word for Levi.

As early as 1959 Levi had written to his German translator, Heinz Reidt, that “suicide is an act of will, a free decision.” In 1981 when Levi’s German teacher, Hanns Engert, hanged himself, Levi was asked to sign a petition claiming it was murder. But the evidence was so overwhelming that he refused: “Hanns killed himself,” he said. “Suicide is a right we all have.”

This brings us to the moral issue at stake here. Levi was a sworn enemy of denial in all its forms. In If This Is a Man he is dismayed when at Auschwitz his friend Alberto convinces himself that his father, just “selected,” will not actually be sent to the gas chambers. It is a renunciation of reality, of sanity. Later, he would be equally dismayed that Alberto’s parents continued to deny the obvious truth that their son had died in the march away from Auschwitz, preferring to believe that he was somehow safe and well in Russia. In The Drowned and the Saved Levi attacks all attempts to find solace in pieties and “convenient truths,” in particular the notion that Auschwitz victims, himself included, were somehow sanctified by their experience, their courage and goodness becoming almost a consolation for the awfulness of what had happened: “It is disingenuous, absurd and historically false,” he writes, “to argue that a hellish system such as National Socialism sanctifies its victims.”

Given that Levi’s instinct was always to encourage the reader to confront the hardest of facts and not take refuge in any comfort zone, we owe it to him to acknowledge the overwhelming evidence of the way he died. His suicide does not diminish his work or his dignity. He was not obliged to his readers to behave in a reassuring way or protect the illusions they had built around his person. “In my work I have portrayed myself…as…well-balanced,” he remarked. “However, I’m not well-balanced at all. I go through long periods of imbalance.”

Whatever his reasons for doing what he did, and clearly in the last months of his life he oscillated between deep depression and rare moments of enthusiasm for new projects, Levi was a free man, exercising “a right we all have.” “He’s done what he’d always said he’d do” were reportedly his wife’s words on returning home to discover what had happened.


Note: Bài này cực 'thú", nếu đọc song song với ‘cas’ TT!
TV sẽ lai rai trích dịch, cùng lúc, tưởng nhớ bạn!
Không biết đám quản giáo VC, khi cần chùi tay, có chùi vô áo tên sĩ quan tù VNCH không, nhỉ?
*
Partisan Review:
Tôi bị chấn động bởi những lá thư mà những độc giả Đức gửi cho ông, sau khi cuốn Đây có phải 1 người, bản tiếng Đức được xb. Đa số nhắc tới giai đoạn xẩy ra sự kiện 1 người lính Đức đã chùi tay của anh ta lên chiếc áo sơ mi của ông. Tại sao, theo ông, sự kiện trên lại khiến cho họ để ý tới?

Primo Levi:
Cử chỉ đó mang tính biểu tượng đặc thù, và vì lý do đó, nó làm nhiều người chấn động, tôi là người đầu tiên. Không phải là 1 cú thượng cẳng chân hạ cẳng tay: đấm vô mặt làm tôi đau hơn. Sự kiện là, anh lính Đức coi tôi như là một cái khăn để chùi tay. Những ngày tiếp theo sau, và ngay cả đến tận bây giờ, tôi vẫn tôi cảm thấy, đây là cú sỉ nhục nặng nề nhất mà tôi đã từng bị.
Những cú sỉ nhục như thế đè nặng lên nhân phẩm của ông tới cỡ nào?

Lúc thoạt đầu, quả là đau, nhưng điều tệ hại là những gì xẩy ra sau đó, nó là cú mở đầu. Chúng tôi trở nên quen. Thì cũng 1 thứ chuyện thường ngày ở huyện.
"Quen", là thế nào, về mặt đạo hạnh, về mặt tinh thần?

Thì nói mẹ ra như thế này: nó làm mất cái gọi là tính người ở nơi bạn. Cách độc nhất để sống sót, là làm quen với cuộc sống trong trại tù, và làm quen như thế, là một phần con người ở nơi bạn mất đi. Điều này xẩy ra cho cả quản giáo và tù nhân. Chẳng có nhóm nào người hơn nhóm nào.Trừ 1 số ngoại lệ, cái gọi là vô nhân tính làm nhiễm độc luôn cả tù nhân, làm sao không! 





Last Christmas of the War

Primo Levi


In more ways than one, Monowitz, a part of Auschwitz, was not a typical camp. The barrier that separated us from the world—symbolized by the double barbedwire fence—was not hermetic, as elsewhere. Our work brought us into daily contact with people who were “free,” or at least less slaves than we were: technicians, German engineers and foremen, Russian and Polish workers, English, American, French, and Italian prisoners of war. Officially they were forbidden to talk to us, the pariahs of KZ (Konzentrations-Zentrum), but the prohibition was constantly ignored, and what’s more, news from the free world reached us through a thousand channels. In the factory trash bins we found copies of the daily papers (sometimes two or three days old and rain-soaked) and in them we read with trepidation the German bulletins: mutilated, censored, euphemistic, yet eloquent. The Allied POWs listened secretly to Radio London, and even more secretly brought us the news, and it was exhilarating. In December 1944 the Russians had entered Hungary and Poland, the English were in the Romagna, the Americans were heavily engaged in the Ardennes but were winning in the Pacific against Japan.



Looking for Primo Levi









Studio Pericoli
Tullio Pericoli: Primo Levi, 2014


The Mystery of Primo Levi 





parks_1-110515.jpg




Sergio del Grande/Mondadori Portfolio/Getty Images
Primo Levi in his studio, Turin, 1981

Primo Levi Page


Số The New Yorker, June 8 & 15 Summer Fiction, có cái truyện ngắn của Primo Levi mới thú.


*



Last Christmas of the War

Primo Levi


In more ways than one, Monowitz, a part of Auschwitz, was not a typical camp. The barrier that separated us from the world—symbolized by the double barbedwire fence—was not hermetic, as elsewhere. Our work brought us into daily contact with people who were “free,” or at least less slaves than we were: technicians, German engineers and foremen, Russian and Polish workers, English, American, French, and Italian prisoners of war. Officially they were forbidden to talk to us, the pariahs of KZ (Konzentrations-Zentrum), but the prohibition was constantly ignored, and what’s more, news from the free world reached us through a thousand channels. In the factory trash bins we found copies of the daily papers (sometimes two or three days old and rain-soaked) and in them we read with trepidation the German bulletins: mutilated, censored, euphemistic, yet eloquent. The Allied POWs listened secretly to Radio London, and even more secretly brought us the news, and it was exhilarating. In December 1944 the Russians had entered Hungary and Poland, the English were in the Romagna, the Americans were heavily engaged in the Ardennes but were winning in the Pacific against Japan.
PRIMO LEVI

Unfinished Business

Sir, please accept my resignation
As of next month,
And, if it seems right, plan on replacing me.
I'm leaving much unfinished work,
Whether out of laziness or actual problems.
I was supposed to tell someone something,
But I no longer know what and to whom: I've forgotten.
I was also supposed to donate something-
A wise word, a gift, a kiss;
I put it offfrom one day to the next. I'm sorry.
I'll do it in the short time that remains.
I'm afraid I've neglected important clients.
I was meant to visit
Distant cities, islands, desert lands;
You'll have to cut them from the program
Or entrust them to my successor.
I was supposed to plant trees and I didn't;
To build myself a house,
Maybe not beautiful, but based on plans.
Mainly, I had in mind
A marvelous book, kind sir,
Which would have revealed many secrets,
Alleviated pains and fears,
Eased doubts, given many
The gift of tears and laughter.
You'll find its outline in my drawer,
Down below, with the unfinished business;
I didn't have the time to write it out, which is a shame,
It would have been a fundamental work.

Translated from the Italian by Jonathan Galassi

PRIMO LEVI* (I9I9-I987) was an Italian chemist and writer, best known for his memoirs if This Is a Man and The Periodic Table. The poem in this issue is from Collected Poems, translated by Jonathan
Galassi, from The Complete Works of Primo Levi, edited by Ann Goldstein. Copyright © I997 by Giulio Einaudi editore s.p.a., Torino.
English translation copyright © 20IS by Jonathan Galassi.

Poetry Magazine Oct 2015
*
Mặt Trời Lặn ở Fossoli

Tôi biết, nghĩa là gì, không trở về.
Qua những hàng rào kẽm gai
tôi nhìn thấy mặt trời xuống và chết
Và da thịt tôi như bị xé ra
Bởi những dòng thơ của một thi sĩ già:
“Mặt trời thì có thể lặn và mọc
Nhưng chúng tôi, ngược hẳn lại
Ngủ, sau 1 tí ánh sáng ngắn ngủi,
Một đêm dài ơi là dài”
Tháng Hai, 7, 1946
Primo Levi


Mít vs Lò Thiêu Người

*

* *

Tạp Ghi Văn Học, Xuân Đinh Sửu,  1 & 2 1977.
Ngụy có bao giờ nghĩ đến chuyện cải tạo Bắc Kít, nếu thắng trận.

Một trong những chương của cuốn sách viết về "Sự hung dữ vô dụng". Những chi tiết về những trò độc ác của đám cai tù, khi hành hạ tù nhân một cách vô cớ, không một mục đích, ngoài thú vui nhìn chính họ đang hành hạ kẻ khác. Sự hung dữ tưởng như vô dụng đó, cuối cùng cho thấy, không phải hoàn toàn vô dụng. Nó đưa đến kết luận: Người Do thái không phải là người. (Kinh nghiệm cay đắng này, nhiều người Việt chúng ta đã từng cảm nhận, và thường là cảm nhận ngược lại: Những người CS không giống mình. Ngày đầu tiên đi trình diện cải tạo, nhiều người sững sờ khi được hỏi, các người sẽ đối xử như thế nào với "chúng tôi", nếu các người chiếm được Miền Bắc. Câu hỏi này gần như không được đặt ra với những người Miền Nam, và nếu được đặt ra, nó cũng không giống như những người CSBV tưởng tượng. Cá nhân người viết có một anh bạn người Nam ở trong quân đội. Anh chỉ mơ, nếu có ngày đó, thì tha hồ mà nhìn ngắm thiên nhiên, con người Hà-nội, Miền Bắc. Lẽ dĩ nhiên, đây vẫn chỉ là những mơ ước, nhận xét hoàn toàn có tính cách cá nhân.
Nhân mới đọc 1 entry của anh tà lọt Osin, viết về VC không biết xấu hổ là gì.
Đặt cạnh cái sự tủi hổ làm người của Levi, thì quả là quá cà chớn. Nhưng, Mít, tất cả Mít, cả Bắc Kít lẫn Nam Kít đều phải thấy tủi hổ, khi để xẩy ra tình trạng 1 xứ Mít như hiện nay.
Không bao giờ chúng ta có lại được/lại có được, 1 chính thể tuyệt vời như là Ngụy nữa.
Đó là sự thực.
VNCH sở dĩ được như thế, là nhờ khí hậu Miền Nam. Nhân tình thế thái, con người, sự hào sảng của thiên nhiên… tạo nên Ngụy.
Khi Thiệu nói, chúng ta không làm như vậy được, lần đi thăm Seoul và thấy quân đội Nam Hàn xả súng bắn vô những người biểu tình đòi hòa giải dân tộc, bắt tay với Bắc Kít, ông nói, trong tinh thần đó, văn minh đó.
Cái Ác Bắc Kít trở thành tối độc, là nhờ cuộc ăn cướp Miền Nam và sau đó, cái thứ bần cố nông, chăn trâu, y tá dạo ngồi lên đầu dân Mít.
Tên tà lọt này làm sao mà hiểu nổi những điều như vậy. Bản thân nó, cũng đã từng dựa hơi 1 tên chăn trâu học lớp 1, đâu cảm thấy xấu hổ?
Cũng thế, là những tên Miền Nam, nằm vùng, tay đầy máu Ngụy. Chúng đâu biết tủi hổ là gì?


Levi sometimes said that he felt a larger shame—shame at being a human being, since human beings invented the world of the concentration camp. But if this is a theory of general shame it is not a theory of original sin. One of the happiest qualities of Levi’s writing is its freedom from religious temptation. He did not like the darkness of Kafka’s vision, and, in a remarkable sentence of dismissal, gets to the heart of a certain theological malaise in Kafka: “He fears punishment, and at the same time desires it . . . a sickness within Kafka himself.” Goodness, for Levi, was palpable and comprehensible, but evil was palpable and incomprehensible. That was the healthiness within himself.
How Primo Levi survived

Levi không chịu nổi Kafka. Ông nói ra điều này, khi dịch Kafka:
Một sự hiếp đáp có tên là Kafka
Franz Kafka & Primo Levi, tại sao?

Không phải tôi chọn, mà là nhà xb. Họ đề nghị và tôi chấp thuận. Kafka không hề là tác giả ruột của tôi. Nói đúng ra, thì là thế này: Tôi đã hơi coi nhẹ một việc dịch như vậy, bởi vì tôi không nghĩ, là mình sẽ phải cực nhọc với nó. Kafka không hề là một trong những tác giả mà tôi yêu thích. Tôi nói lý do tại sao: Không có gì là chắc chắn, về chuyện, những tác phẩm mà mình thích, thì có gì giông giống với những tác phẩm của mình, mà thường là ngược lại. Kafka đối với tôi, không phải là chuyện dửng dưng, hoặc buồn bực, mà là một tình cảm, một cảm giác thủ thế, phòng ngự. Tôi nhận ra điều này khi dịch Vụ Án. Tôi cảm thấy như bị cuốn sách hiếp đáp, bị nó tấn công. Và tôi phải bảo vệ, phòng thủ. Bởi vì đây là một cuốn sách rất tuyệt. Nhưng nó đâm thấu bạn, giống như một mũi tên, một ngọn lao. Độc giả nào cũng cảm thấy như bị đưa ra xét xử, khi đọc nó. Ngoài ra, ngồi thoải mái trong chiếc ghế bành với cuốn sách ở trên tay, khác hẳn chuyện hì hục dịch từng từ, từng câu. Trong khi dịch tôi hiểu ra lý do của sự thù nghịch (hostile) của tôi với Kafka. Đó là do bản năng tự vệ, phản xạ phòng ngự, do sợ hãi  gây nên. Có thể, còn một lý do xác đáng hơn: Kafka là người Do Thái, tôi cũng là Do Thái. Vụ Án bắt đầu bằng một chuyện bắt giam không dự đoán trước được, và chẳng thể nào biện minh, nghề nghiệp viết lách của tôi bắt đầu bằng một vụ bắt bớ không lường trước được và chẳng thể biện minh. Kafka là một tác giả mà tôi ngưỡng mộ, tuy không ưa, tôi sợ ông ta, giống như bị sao quả tạ giáng cho một cú bất thình lình, hoặc bị một nhà tiên tri nói cho bạn biết, bạn chết vào ngày nào tháng nào.

Note: Bài dịch này, hân hạnh được Sến để mắt tới, cho đăng trên talawas. Tks. NQT
Đâu dễ gì được Sến để mắt tới!

Levi, đôi lúc nói, ông cảm nhận một sự tủi hổ lớn rộng hơn - tủi hổ là 1 con người, kể từ khi mà con người phát minh ra thế giới trại tù, trại tập trung, lò thiêu, lò cải tạo. Nhưng nếu đây là 1 lý thuyết tủi hổ, nói chung, thì nó không phải là 1 lý thuyết về tội tổ tông. Một trong những phẩm chất hạnh phúc nhất của cái viết của Levi, là nó thoát ra khỏi nỗi thèm tôn giáo – cái tự do thoát ra khỏi cám dỗ tôn giáo của nó - ông không thích sự u ám của viễn ảnh Kafka, và trong 1 câu phán thật là bảnh tỏng của sự từ chối, đi chỗ khác chơi, xoáy vào tim gan bực bội thần học ở nơi Kafka: “Ông ta sợ sự trừng phạt, và cùng lúc, thèm nó, một cơn bịnh ở trong Kafka, đích thị xừ lủy!”
Cái tốt, với Levi, thì sờ soạng mân mê và có thể hiểu được, cái xấu thì cũng mân mê sờ soạng được, nhưng không thể hiểu được. Đây là khía cạnh lành mạnh, ở nơi Levi, đích thị xừ lủy!

V/v tủi hổ.

Nhân mới đọc 1 entry của anh tà lọt Osin, viết về VC không biết xấu hổ là gì.
Đặt cạnh cái sự tủi hổ làm người của Levi, thì quả là quá cà chớn. Nhưng, Mít, tất cả Mít, cả Bắc Kít lẫn Nam Kít đều phải thấy tủi hổ, khi để xẩy ra tình trạng 1 xứ Mít như hiện nay.
Không bao giờ chúng ta có lại được/lại có được, 1 chính thể tuyệt vời như là Ngụy nữa.
Đó là sự thực.
VNCH sở dĩ được như thế, là nhờ khí hậu Miền Nam. Nhân tình thế thái, con người, sự hào sảng của thiên nhiên… tạo nên Ngụy.
Khi Thiệu nói, chúng ta không làm như vậy được, lần đi thăm Seoul và thấy quân đội Nam Hàn xả súng bắn vô những người biểu tình đòi hòa giải dân tộc, bắt tay với Bắc Kít, ông nói, trong tinh thần đó, văn minh đó.
Cái Ác Bắc Kít trở thành tối độc, là nhờ cuộc ăn cướp Miền Nam và sau đó, cái thứ bần cố nông, chăn trâu, y tá dạo ngồi lên đầu dân Mít.
Tên tà lọt này làm sao mà hiểu nổi những điều như vậy. Bản thân nó, cũng đã từng dựa hơi 1 tên chăn trâu học lớp 1, đâu cảm thấy xấu hổ?
Cũng thế, là những tên Miền Nam, nằm vùng, tay đầy máu Ngụy. Chúng đâu biết tủi hổ là gì?

It is not at all surprising that Levi translated Kafka (The Trial). Even if Kafka died, fortuitously, before the Holocaust, its shadow imbues the work of both. If one saw it looming in the future, the other looked back to see how it suffused the past. What is curious is that Levi said, in an essay on his translation in the collection The Mirror Maker, “I don’t think I have much affinity for Kafka,” and went on to explain the difference he perceived between them:

Nhận xét cùa Desai, về Kafka và Levi, tuyệt.
Không phải tự nhiên mà Levi dịch Kafka, dù Levi cho biết, ông không chịu nổi Kafka.


Mít vs Lò Thiêu Người

The Gulag can be regarded as the quintessential expression of modern Russian society. This vast array of punishment zones across Russia, started in Tsarist times and ending in the Soviet era, left a legacy on the Russian quest for identity. In Russia, prison is usually referred to as the malinkaya zone (small zone). The Russians have an expression for freedom: bolshaya zona, (big zone). The distinction being that one is slightly less humane than the other. But which one? A Russian friend once said, "First they make you work in the factory, then they finish you off in prison." By the 1950s, the Gulag played an integral role in the development of the Soviet economy. In fact, Stalin used these camps as a source of economic stimulation, to excavate the vast natural resources of the east and to stimulate growth and settlement across the twelve time zones of the former USSR. The majority of mines, timber industries, factories, and Russia's prized oil and gas fields were all discovered through convict labour. In effect, almost every imaginable industry in Russia today exists because of Stalin's policy. This photo was taken at the state theatre in Vorkuta, a large city in the far north of Russia, beyond the Arctic Circle, and one of the largest penal colonies created by the Soviet bureaucracy. Today, survivors-both prisoner and guard-and their descendants still live in this city. The woman was the lead in a play by Ostrovsky: Crazy Money.
www.donaldweber.com
Spring 2015
THE NEW QUARTERLY

Nếu không có cú dậy cho VC một bài học, lũ Ngụy "vẫn sống ở Trại Tù", cùng với con cái của chúng.

Tờ Điểm Sách Nữu Ước, NYRB, có bài của Timothy Snyder, về “Thế giới của Hitler”. 
Tờ Người Nữu Ước, Adam Gopnik có bài “Những ám ảnh của Hitler”.
Tin Văn post cả hai, và thủng thẳng đi vài đường về nó. Một câu chuyện mới về Lò Thiêu, như Adam Gopnik, tác giả bài viết trên tờ Người Nữu Ước, phán.

Gulag có thể được coi như là 1 biểu hiện cốt tuỷ của xã hội hiện đại Nga. Không gian tù kể như khắp nước Nga, thời gian, khởi từ chế độ phong kiến và chấm dứt cùng với thời kỳ Xô Viết, để lại gia tài là cuộc truy tìm căn cước Nga.  Ở Nga, nhà tù thường được gọi là “vùng nhỏ”. Và họ có 1 chữ để gọi tự do, “vùng lớn”.
Cái nào “người” hơn cái nào?
Trước tiên, họ cho anh làm ở nhà máy, sau nhà máy, thì tới nhà tù.
Trong bài điểm cuốn Mùa Gặt Buồn của Conquest, Tolstaya phán, chế độ Xô Viết chẳng hề phịa ra 1 thứ trừng phạt mới nào.
Chúng có sẵn hết, từ hồi phong kiến. Cái gọi là thời ăn thịt người cũng có sẵn, từ thời Ivan Bạo Chúa.
Tất cả những nhận xét trên đây, áp dụng y chang vào xứ Bắc Kít. Suốt bốn ngàn năm văn hiến, Bắc Kít chưa từng biết đến tự do, dân chủ… là cái gì.
Những hình phạt thời kỳ phong kiến, đầy rẫy. Bạn thử chỉ cho Gấu, trong lịch sử Bắc Kít, một giai thoại nào, liên quan, mắc mớ, "nói lên" lòng nhân từ của… Bắc Kít?
Tô Hoài, thay vì gọi “Đàng Ngoài”, thì chỉ đích danh, “Quê Người”.
Ông biết, có 1 nơi đúng là Quê Nhà, nhưng cùng với cái biết đó, là dã tâm ăn cướp.
Hết phong kiến, thì lại đô hộ Tầu, hoặc xen kẽ, rồi bảo hộ Pháp.
Thời ăn thịt người cũng có.
Ăn thịt lợn, vỗ béo bằng thai nhi, thì cũng là ăn thịt người, vậy.

During Stalin's time, as I see it, Russian society, brutalized by centuries of violence, intoxicated by the feeling that everything was allowed, destroyed everything "alien": "the enemy," "minorities"-any and everything the least bit different from the "average." At first this was simple and exhilarating: the aristocracy, foreigners, ladies in hats, gentlemen in ties, everyone who wore eyeglasses, everyone who read books, everyone who spoke a literary language and showed some signs of education; then it became more and more difficult, the material for destruction began to run out, and society turned inward and began to destroy itself. Without popular support Stalin and his cannibals wouldn't have lasted for long. The executioner's genius expressed itself in his ability to feel and direct the evil forces slumbering in the people; he deftly manipulated the choice of courses, knew who should be the hors d' oeuvres, who the main course, and who should be left for dessert; he knew what honorific toasts to pronounce and what inebriating ideological cocktails to offer (now's the time to serve subtle wines to this group; later that one will get strong liquor).
    It is this hellish cuisine that Robert Conquest examines. And the leading character of this fundamental work, whether the author intends it or not, is not just the butcher, but all the sheep that collaborated with him, slicing and seasoning their own meat for a monstrous shish kebab.

Tatyana Tolstaya

Lần trở lại xứ Bắc, về lại làng cũ, hỏi bà chị ruột về Cô Hồng Con, bà cho biết, con địa chỉ, bố mẹ bị bắt, nhà phong tỏa, cấm không được quan hệ, và cũng chẳng ai dám quan hệ. Bị thương hàn, đói, và khát, và do nóng sốt quá, khát nước quá, cô gái bò ra cái ao ở truớc nhà, tới bờ ao thì gục xuống chết.
Có thể cảm thấy đứa em quá đau khổ, bà an ủi, hồi đó “phong trào”.


Tolstaya viết:

Trong thời Stalin, như tôi biết, xã hội Nga, qua bao thế kỷ sống dưới cái tàn bạo, bèn trở thành tàn bạo, bị cái độc, cái ác ăn tới xương tới tuỷ, và bèn sướng điên lên, bởi tình cảm, ý nghĩ, rằng, mọi chuyện đều được phép, và bèn hủy diệt mọi thứ mà nó coi là “ngoại nhập”: kẻ thù, nhóm, dân tộc thiểu số, mọi thứ có tí ti khác biệt với nhân dân chúng ta, cái thường ngày ở xứ Bắc Kít. Lúc đầu thì thấy đơn giản, và có tí tếu, hài: lũ trưởng giả, người ngoại quốc, những kẻ đeo cà vạt, đeo kiếng, đọc sách, có vẻ có tí học vấn…. nhưng dần dần của khôn người khó, kẻ thù cạn dần, thế là xã hội quay cái ác vào chính nó, tự huỷ diệt chính nó. Nếu không có sự trợ giúp phổ thông, đại trà của nhân dân, Stalin và những tên ăn thịt người đệ tử lâu la không thể sống dai đến như thế. Thiên tài của tên đao phủ, vỗ ngực xưng tên, phô trương chính nó, bằng khả năng cảm nhận, dẫn dắt những sức mạnh ma quỉ ru ngủ đám đông, khôn khéo thao túng đường đi nước bước, biết, ai sẽ là món hors d’oeuvre, ai là món chính, ai sẽ để lại làm món tráng miệng…
Đó là nhà bếp địa ngục mà Conquest săm soi. Và nhân vật dẫn đầu thì không phải chỉ là tên đao phủ, nhưng mà là tất cả bầy cừu cùng cộng tác với hắn, đứa thêm mắm, đứa thêm muối, thêm tí bột ngọt, cho món thịt của cả lũ.

Cuốn "Đại Khủng Bố", của Conquest, bản nhìn lại, a reassessment, do Oxford University Press xb, 1990.
Bài điểm sách, của Tolstaya, 1991.
GCC qua được trại tị nạn Thái Lan, cc 1990.
Như thế, đúng là 1 cơ may cực hãn hữu, được đọc nó, khi vừa mới Trại, qua tờ Thế Kỷ 21, với cái tên “Những Thời Ăn Thịt Người”. Không có nó, là không có Gấu Cà Chớn. Không có trang Tin Văn.
Có thể nói, cả cuộc đời Gấu, như 1 tên Bắc Kít, nhà quê, may mắn được ra Hà Nội học, nhờ 1 bà cô là Me Tây, rồi được di cư vào Nam, rồi được đi tù VC, rồi được qua Thái Lan... là để được đọc bài viết!
Bây giờ, được đọc nguyên văn bài điểm sách, đọc những đoạn mặc khải, mới cảm khái chi đâu. Có thể nói, cả cái quá khứ của Gấu ở Miền Bắc, và Miền Bắc - không phải Liên Xô - xuất hiện, qua bài viết.
Khủng khiếp thật!


Tatyana Tolstaya, trong một bài người viết tình cờ đọc đã lâu, khi còn ở Trại Cấm, và chỉ được đọc qua bản dịch, Những Thời Ăn Thịt Người (đăng trên tờ Thế Kỷ 21), cho rằng, chủ nghĩa Cộng-sản không phải từ trên trời rớt xuống, cái tư duy chuyên chế không phải do Xô-viết bịa đặt ra, mà đã nhô lên từ những tầng sâu hoang vắng của lịch sử Nga. Người dân Nga, dưới thời Ivan Bạo Chúa, đã từng bảo nhau, người Nga không ăn, mà ăn thịt lẫn nhau. ["We Russians don't need to eat; we eat one another and this satisfies us."].
Chính cái phần Á-châu man rợ đó đã được đưa lên làm giai cấp nồng cốt xây dựng xã hội chủ nghĩa. Bà khẳng định, nếu không có sự yểm trợ của nhân dân Nga, chế độ Stalin không thể sống dai như thế. Puskhin đã từng van vái: Lạy Trời đừng bao giờ phải chứng kiến một cuộc cách mạng Nga! "God forbid we should ever witness a Russian revolt, senseless and merciless," our brilliant poet Pushkin remarked as early as the first quarter of the nineteenth century.

Trong bài viết, Tolstaya kể, khi cuốn của Conquest, được tái bản ở Liên Xô, lần thứ nhất, trên tờ Neva, “last year” [1990, chắc hẳn], bằng tiếng Nga, tất nhiên, độc giả Nga, đọc, sửng sốt la lên, cái gì, những chuyện này, chúng tớ biết hết rồi!
Bà giải thích, họ biết rồi, là do đọc Conquest, đọc lén, qua những ấn bản chui, từ hải ngoại tuồn về!
Bản đầu tiên của nó, xb truớc đó 20 năm, bằng tiếng Anh, đã được tuồn vô Liên Xô, như 1 thứ sách “dưới hầm”, underground, best seller.
Cuốn sách đạt thế giá folklore, độc giả Nga đo lường lịch sử Nga, qua Conquest,"according to Conquest"

Nh
ân nhắc tới Tông Tông Thiệu.



The Art of Witness
How Primo Levi survived

Bài mới nhất về Primo Levi trên The New Yorker

His friend Edith Bruck, herself a survivor of Auschwitz and Dachau, said, “There are no howls in Primo’s writing—all emotion is controlled—but Primo gave such a howl of freedom at his death.” This is moving, certainly, and perhaps true. Thus one consoles oneself, and consolation is necessary: like much suicide, Levi’s death is only a silent howl, because it voids its own echo. It is natural to be bewildered, and it is important not to moralize. For, above all, Job existed and was not a parable. 

Không có gầm rú, gào thét trong cái viết của Primo Levi - mọi xúc động đều được kiềm chế - nhưng Primo đem đến tiếng gầm rú của tự do, với cái chết của mình. Rằng, con người tự an ủi mình, và an ủi thì cần thiết: giống như tự làm thịt mình, cái chết của Levi chỉ là tiếng gầm rú của im lặng…

Thảo nào GCC cứ tính thử hoài, tiếng gầm rú của im lặng!
*

Làm mới Ngọn Lửa Cũ:
Primo Levi ở Lò Thiêu

Vào ngày 13 tháng Chạp 1943, Primo Levi, 24 tuổi, bị Phát Xít Ý bắt. Chín tuần sau, khai là công dân Ý gốc Do Thái, bèn bị tống vô Lò Thiêu với tất cả những tù nhân Do Thái khác. Tất cả, ngay cả trẻ con, người già, người bịnh.
Trong 1 lần cùng làm 1 ca với Jean, một tù nhân 17 tuổi, anh này nhờ Levi chỉ cho vài chiêu tiếng Ý, thế là "Kịch Trời" của Dante bật ra trong đầu Levi.
Cái ngọn ngọn lửa, ngọn lửa cũ
Bắt đầu lắc lư, lầm bầm, lầu bầu
Như thể ngọn lửa đang chống cự với gió
Mang tới mang lui
Như cái lưỡi
Thì thào lời, “Khi mà….”
Chỉ có thế, là hết. Như thể hồi ức, vào những lúc thật thầu sầu của nó, vưỡn phản bội chúng ta

Levi sometimes said that he felt a larger shame—shame at being a human being, since human beings invented the world of the concentration camp. But if this is a theory of general shame it is not a theory of original sin. One of the happiest qualities of Levi’s writing is its freedom from religious temptation. He did not like the darkness of Kafka’s vision, and, in a remarkable sentence of dismissal, gets to the heart of a certain theological malaise in Kafka: “He fears punishment, and at the same time desires it . . . a sickness within Kafka himself.” Goodness, for Levi, was palpable and comprehensible, but evil was palpable and incomprehensible. That was the healthiness within himself.
How Primo Levi survived

Levi không chịu nổi Kafka. Ông nói ra điều này, khi dịch Kafka:
Một sự hiếp đáp có tên là Kafka
Franz Kafka & Primo Levi, tại sao?

Không phải tôi chọn, mà là nhà xb. Họ đề nghị và tôi chấp thuận. Kafka không hề là tác giả ruột của tôi. Nói đúng ra, thì là thế này: Tôi đã hơi coi nhẹ một việc dịch như vậy, bởi vì tôi không nghĩ, là mình sẽ phải cực nhọc với nó. Kafka không hề là một trong những tác giả mà tôi yêu thích. Tôi nói lý do tại sao: Không có gì là chắc chắn, về chuyện, những tác phẩm mà mình thích, thì có gì giông giống với những tác phẩm của mình, mà thường là ngược lại. Kafka đối với tôi, không phải là chuyện dửng dưng, hoặc buồn bực, mà là một tình cảm, một cảm giác thủ thế, phòng ngự. Tôi nhận ra điều này khi dịch Vụ Án. Tôi cảm thấy như bị cuốn sách hiếp đáp, bị nó tấn công. Và tôi phải bảo vệ, phòng thủ. Bởi vì đây là một cuốn sách rất tuyệt. Nhưng nó đâm thấu bạn, giống như một mũi tên, một ngọn lao. Độc giả nào cũng cảm thấy như bị đưa ra xét xử, khi đọc nó. Ngoài ra, ngồi thoải mái trong chiếc ghế bành với cuốn sách ở trên tay, khác hẳn chuyện hì hục dịch từng từ, từng câu. Trong khi dịch tôi hiểu ra lý do của sự thù nghịch (hostile) của tôi với Kafka. Đó là do bản năng tự vệ, phản xạ phòng ngự, do sợ hãi  gây nên. Có thể, còn một lý do xác đáng hơn: Kafka là người Do Thái, tôi cũng là Do Thái. Vụ Án bắt đầu bằng một chuyện bắt giam không dự đoán trước được, và chẳng thể nào biện minh, nghề nghiệp viết lách của tôi bắt đầu bằng một vụ bắt bớ không lường trước được và chẳng thể biện minh. Kafka là một tác giả mà tôi ngưỡng mộ, tuy không ưa, tôi sợ ông ta, giống như bị sao quả tạ giáng cho một cú bất thình lình, hoặc bị một nhà tiên tri nói cho bạn biết, bạn chết vào ngày nào tháng nào.

Note: Bài dịch này, hân hạnh được Sến để mắt tới, cho đăng trên talawas. Tks. NQT
Đâu dễ gì được Sến để mắt tới!
*



Note: Cái tít bài viết về Primo Levi, của Tony Judt, trên tờ NYRB, số May, 20, 1999, mà GCC dựa theo đó, viết “Đây có phải một người”, đăng lần đầu trên Văn Học, NMG, đúng ra là, “The Courage of the Elementary”, tạm dịch, “Sự Can Đảm của Cái Cơ Bản”, là từ  Milosz, khi ông viết về Camus, “ông ta [Camus] có cái sự can đảm tạo ra những điểm cơ bản, [“he had the courage to make the elementary points”]. Trong Lại Tỉnh Thức, “The Reawakening”, Levi miêu tả 1 đứa bé, khác đứa bé chết đuối đang được nhắc tới, mà là ở Lò Thiêu. Nó sống sót Lò Thiêu, nhưng chết, đúng lúc được giải thoát.
Bài viết này, tình cờ GCC vớ lại được nó, trong số báo cũ, bèn đọc lại, để thẩm tra trình độ tiếng Anh hồi tập tạnh dịch! Bỏ đi nhiều quá, nhiều chi tiết, sự kiện thực là thú vị. Vả chăng, bài dài quá.

Hurbinek was a nobody, a child of death, a child of Auschwitz. He looked about three years old, no one knew anything of him, he could not speak and he had no name; that curious name, Hurbinek, had been given to him by us, perhaps by one of the women who had interpreted with those syllables one of the inarticulate sounds that the baby let out now and again. He was paralyzed from the waist down, with atrophied legs, thin as sticks; but his eyes, lost in his triangular and wasted face, flashed terribly alive, full of demand, assertion, of the will to break loose, to shatter the tomb 'of his dumbness. The speech he lacked, which no one had bothered to teach him, the need of speech charged his stare with explosive urgency: it was a stare both savage and human, even mature, a judgement, which none of us could support, so heavy was it with force and anguish ....
During the night we listened carefully: ... from Hurbinek's corner there occasionally came a sound, a word. It was not, admittedly, always exactly the same word, but it was certainly an articulated word; or better, several slightly different articulated words, experimental variations on a theme, on a root, perhaps on a name.
Hurbinek, who was three years old and perhaps had been born in Auschwitz and had never seen a tree; Hurbinek, who had fought like a man, to the last breath, to gain his entry into the world of men, from which a bestial power had excluded him; Hurbinek, the nameless, whose tiny forearm -even his-bore the tattoo of Auschwitz; Hurbinek died in the first days of March 1945, free but not redeemed. Nothing remains of him: he bears witness through these words of mine." [The Reawakening, pp. 25-26].

Cái kinh nghiệm "1 lần rồi thôi" -  khi viết về Mít vượt biển– Levi, thoạt đầu, không có, bởi là vì đếch ai thèm nghe, dù có nói, và, chính ông cũng không làm sao vượt được cái mặc cảm tội lỗi “sống sót” Lò Thiêu, của mình.
Sống sót, đúng là như thế, nhưng tại sao Levi, tui?

Cái tên Bắc Kít LDD làm sao hiểu được nỗi đau này.
Hắn chọc quê lũ Mít ở Mẽo, đa số gốc Ngụy.
Hắn làm sao hiểu được 1 điều thật là đơn giản, thắng trận nhục nhã lắm, nhục nhã hơn nhiều, so với thất trận, nếu hắn đủ can đảm, để, từ Mẽo, nhìn lại 1 xứ Mít tang thương, điêu tàn, nhờ thắng trận.       


Hurbinek là 1 đứa trẻ “không đứa trẻ”, một đứa bé của cái chết, một đứa trẻ của Lò Thiêu. Trông nó chừng ba tuổi, chẳng ai biết 1 tí gì về nó, nó không thể nói, và không có tên; cái tên kỳ cục là do chúng tôi gán cho nó, có lẽ, của một người đàn bà, người này đã cắt nghĩa cái tên, bằng những âm thanh "chẳng ra làm sao" mà đứa bé, lúc này lúc khác, thốt ra.
Đứa bé bị liệt nửa người, từ thắt lưng xuống phía dưới, chân teo lại, khẳng khiu giống như hai cái que; nhưng hai con mắt của đứa bé, thất lạc ở trong khuôn mặt hoang phế, tam giác, thì lại cực kỳ sống động, sống động một cách khủng khiếp, đầy ắp đòi hỏi, xác nhận, ý chí, ham muốn đập bể, phá vỡ tấm mồ là cái ù lỳ, đần độn của nó. Cái tiếng nói mà nó thiếu chẳng ai bỏ công dậy, cái yêu cầu, “nói”, đó, khiến cho cái nhìn của nó trở nên cấp bách, hung hãn, như 1 khối thuốc nổ: đây là cái nhìn thú vật, nhân bản, ngay cả, có thể nói, trưởng thành, một phán quyết mà không ai trong chúng ta có thể hỗ trợ, cực kỳ nặng nề với sức mạnh và niềm khắc khoải….





*
What If?


July 19, 2007
Anita Desai.
A Tranquil Star: Unpublished Stories
by Primo Levi, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein and Alessandra Bastagli
Norton, 164 pp., $21.95 
“Playful” is probably the last adjective one would think to use for the oeuvre of the Primo Levi who wrote Survival in Auschwitz, describing the ordeal he lived through but never left behind. And yet, on reading the latest collection of his stories to be translated into English, A Tranquil Star, on the anniversary of his death twenty years ago, one cannot avoid the impression of playfulness in these small stories written between 1949 and 1986, each of which seems to be an offspring of the question “What if…?”
What if a kangaroo were to go to a dinner party? What if the weekend’s entertainment were a gladiatorial battle between men and automobiles? What if there were a magic paint that brought good fortune to anyone covered with it? What if all the characters invented by novelists were to live in a theme park together?
Primo Levi was a writer who was also a scientist—specifically an industrial chemist—and both professions required him to constantly ask and explore the question “What if…?” At his desk as in his laboratory, he devised answers to the teasing question and came up with extraordinary inventions—eccentric, imaginative, and never what one would expect. They were rooted in the known world, certainly, the answers had to be realistic to satisfy him, but they took on—quite rapidly in these small tales we have here—the aspect of dreams, and dreams that threatened always to bloom dangerously into nightmares.
It is not at all surprising that Levi translated Kafka (The Trial). Even if Kafka died, fortuitously, before the Holocaust, its shadow imbues the work of both. If one saw it looming in the future, the other looked back to see how it suffused the past. What is curious is that Levi said, in an essay on his translation in the collection The Mirror Maker, “I don’t think I have much affinity for Kafka,” and went on to explain the difference he perceived between them:
In my writing, for good or evil, knowingly or not, I’ve always strived to pass from the darkness into the light, as…a filtering pump might do, which sucks up turbid water and expels it decanted: possibly sterile. Kafka forges his path in the opposite direction: he endlessly unravels the hallucinations that he draws from incredibly profound layers, and he never filters them. The reader feels them swarm with germs and spores: they are gravid with burning significances, but he never receives any help in tearing through the veil or circumventing it to go and see what it conceals. Kafka never touches ground, he never condescends to giving you the end of Ariadne’s thread.
Now it is true that one could never think of Kafkas’s stories as “playful” and it is also true that, as Levi puts it, “perhaps Kafka laughed when he told stories to his friends, sitting at a table in a beer hall, because one isn’t always equal to oneself, but …

Note: Nhân trong nước dịch Primo Levi, TV sẽ dịch và giới thiệu bài điểm cuốn “Ngôi Sao Lặng Lẽ: Những câu chuyện chưa từng in ấn” của Primo Levi
Cái tít bài điểm của Desai, là cũng muốn nhắc tới Levi, If This Is A Man, theo GNV.
Nếu như, giả như... có 1 người.
Nếu như, giả như đây là 1 người?
*

CARBON
The reader, at this point, will have realized for some time now that this is not a chemical treatise: my presumption does not reach so far-"ma voix est foible, et même un peu profane." (1) Nor is it an autobiography, save in the partial and symbolic limits in which every piece of writing is autobiographical, indeed every human work; but it is in some fashion a history.
Note: Có lẽ là faible, yếu ớt.
Mũi lõ mà cũng in sai!

What if

Review
A Tranquil Star: Unpublished Stories
by Primo Levi, translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein and Alessandra BastagliNorton, 164 pp., $21.95

It is not at all surprising that Levi translated Kafka (The Trial). Even if Kafka died, fortuitously, before the Holocaust, its shadow imbues the work of both. If one saw it looming in the future, the other looked back to see how it suffused the past. What is curious is that Levi said, in an essay on his translation in the collection The Mirror Maker, "I don't think I have much affinity for Kafka," and went on to explain the difference he perceived between them.
Chẳng có gì là ngạc nhiên, khi Levi dịch Kafka, (Vụ Án ). Ngay cả chuyện, nếu Kafka may mắn đi sớm, trước khi xẩy ra Lò Thiêu, thì cái bóng của Lò Thiêu cũng tẩm đẫm trong tác phẩm của cả hai. Nếu một, nhìn thấy bông hoa độc nở bung ra, ở trong tương lai, một, nhìn ngoái lại, để hiểu bằng cách nào nó tẩm độc quá khứ. Điều lạ lùng là, Levi phán, tôi chẳng có gì giống lắm với Kafka.
"Playful" is probably the last adjective one would think to use for the oeuvre of the Primo Levi who wrote Survival in Auschwitz, describing the ordeal he lived through but never left behind. And yet, on reading the latest collection of his stories to be translated into English, A Tranquil Star, on the anniversary of his death twenty years ago, one cannot avoid the impression of playfulness in these small stories written between 1949 and 1986, each of which seems to be an offspring of the question "What if...?
"Vui thôi mà! Đây có lẽ là tĩnh từ sau cùng mà người ta có thể sử dụng, cho tác phẩm của Primo Levi, người đã từng viết Sống sót ở Auschwitz, để diễn tả những cay đắng, nghiệt ngã ông đã sống, và không làm sao bỏ lại ở phía sau...
*
Trong một tác phẩm mới đây, Pierre Dumayet viết, một cách ngồ ngộ, rằng “Với Kafka, sự nhục nhã, tủi hồ chính là ‘phong cảnh quê ta’ [“chez Kafka, l’humiliation est un paysage”].
Nhưng, ‘may mắn thay’ với Kafka, còn là những câu chuyện hài, và chính cái hài này, “nó” cứu rỗi..
Ở Việt Nam, bạn có thể tìm thấy cái chất hài này, qua những câu chuyện có tí hiện thực ma tuý - huyền ảo thì cũng rứa - thí dụ như của Hồ Anh Thái, hoặc loại chuyện thiếu nhi dành cho người lớn, như truyện dài “Vừa nhắm mắt vừa mở cửa sổ” của Nguyễn Ngọc Thuần, hoặc thứ phê bình văn học của Trần Đăng Khoa chẳng hạn.
Nên nhớ, Kafka đã từng đọc bản thảo cho bạn bè nghe, và vừa đọc, vừa cười ngặt ngẽo [en hurlant de rire, chữ của Frédéric Beigbeder).
Từ đó, chúng ta hiểu được, không phải Thượng Đế, mà là con người, bị kết án phải... cười. Với Kafka, tất cả những câu chuyện buồn tủi nhục nhã khốn khổ của ông (Vụ Án và luôn cả Toà Lâu Đài, và Hoá Thân) đều là những câu chuyện tiếu lâm to tổ bố, grosses farces, vẫn chữ của Frédéric Beigbeder.
Theo ông này, Kafka đi trước đám Tiểu Thuyết Mới ở Tây cả nửa thế kỷ, 12 chương của Vụ Án được viết bằng một thứ văn gẫy đoạn, người ta có thể nói, của  Nathalie Sarraute.
Vụ Án còn là một thứ chuyện “Liêu Trai” có tính tiên tri (un fantasme prophétique), như rất nhiều cuốn sách khác ở trong Bảng Phong Thần Cuối Cùng.
Cuốn tiểu thuyết được in và xuất bản vào năm 1925, nhưng Kafka đã viết nó mười năm trước, tức là năm 1914, trước khi có cuộc cách mạng Nga, Cuộc Đệ Nhất Thế Chiến, chủ nghĩa Quốc Xã Nazi, chủ nghĩa Stalin: thế giới được miêu tả ở trong cuốn sách, chưa hiện hữu, chưa “đi vào hiện thực”. Vậy mà ông nhìn thấy! Liệu có thể coi ông là Ông Thầy Bói Nostradamus của thế kỷ 20?
Không phải vậy: cái thế kỷ có tên là Goulag đó chỉ là một đứa trẻ ngoan ngoãn tuân theo lời phán bảo của ông thầy của nó, mà thôi.
Tam sinh vạn vật.
Cuốn Vụ Án của Kafka đứng số 3, trong Bảng Phong Thần Cuối Cùng trước khi dâng hiến tất cả cho lò thiêu.
*
"perhaps Kafka laughed when he told stories to his friends, sitting at a table in a beer hall, because one isn't always equal to oneself, but he certainly didn't laugh when he wrote..
"Có thể, Kafka cười, khi ông kể những câu chuyện cho bè bạn, trong lúc bia bọt, bởi vì con người có lúc thế này, có lúc thế nọ, nhưng chắc chắn, ông không cười, khi ngồi viết".
Levi
What If?
By Anita Desai

Đây có phải một người? What If?
Địa ngục đã làm việc ra sao?

Một sự hiếp đáp có tên là Kafka
Primo Levi

-Franz Kafka_Primo Levi, tại sao?

-Không phải tôi chọn, mà là nhà xb. Họ đề nghị và tôi chấp thuận. Kafka không hề là tác giả ruột của tôi. Nói đúng ra, thì là thế này: Tôi đã hơi coi nhẹ một việc dịch như vậy, bởi vì tôi không nghĩ, là mình sẽ phải cực nhọc với nó. Kafka không hề là một trong những tác giả mà tôi yêu thích. Tôi nói lý do tại sao: Không có gì là chắc chắn, về chuyện, những tác phẩm mà mình thích, thì có gì giông giống với những tác phẩm của mình, mà thường là ngược lại. Kafka đối với tôi, không phải là chuyện dửng dưng, hoặc buồn bực, mà là một tình cảm, một cảm giác thủ thế, phòng ngự. Tôi nhận ra điều này khi dịch Vụ Án. Tôi cảm thấy như bị cuốn sách hiếp đáp, bị nó tấn công. Và tôi phải bảo vệ, phòng thủ. Bởi vì đây là một cuốn sách rất tuyệt. Nhưng nó đâm thấu bạn, giống như một mũi tên, một ngọn lao. Độc giả nào cũng cảm thấy như bị đưa ra xét xử, khi đọc nó. Ngoài ra, ngồi thoải mái trong chiếc ghế bành với cuốn sách ở trên tay, khác hẳn chuyện hì hục dịch từng từ, từng câu. Trong khi dịch tôi hiểu ra lý do của sự thù nghịch (hostile) của tôi với Kafka. Đó là do bản năng tự vệ, phản xạ phòng ngự, do sợ hãi  gây nên. Có thể, còn một lý do xác đáng hơn: Kafka là người Do Thái, tôi cũng là Do Thái. Vụ Án bắt đầu bằng một chuyện bắt giam không dự đoán trước được, và chẳng thể nào biện minh, nghề nghiệp viết lách của tôi bắt đầu bằng một vụ bắt bớ không lường trước được và chẳng thể biện minh. Kafka là một tác giả mà tôi ngưỡng mộ, tuy không ưa, tôi sợ ông ta, giống như bị sao quả tạ giáng cho một cú bất thình lình, hoặc bị một nhà tiên tri nói cho bạn biết, bạn chết vào ngày nào tháng nào.
*

Chuyện của tôi là trường hợp đặc biệt. Bởi vì họ khám phá ra tôi là một nhà hoá học, tôi được làm việc trong một xưởng hóa học. Chúng tôi có ba người, trong số 10 ngàn tù nhân. Hoàn cảnh cá nhân của tôi hết sức đặc biệt, như vị trí và hoàn cảnh của bất cứ một kẻ sống sót nào. Một tù nhân bình thường chết. Đó là cách trốn trại của anh ta. Sau khi qua lần kiểm tra về hoá học, tôi chờ coi những ông sếp sẽ tính gì về mình. Nhưng chỉ có một ông là còn có tí tính người, qua đó, là sự cảm thông, đối với tôi, đó là Dr. Muller, sếp trực tiếp, my supervisor, ở phòng thí nghiệm. Chúng tôi bàn luận về chuyện này, sau chiến tranh, qua thư từ. Ông ta là một con người thường thường bậc trung, an average man, không anh hùng mà cũng không dã man. Ông ta không biết gì về hoàn cảnh của chúng tôi. Được thuyên chuyển tới Auschwitz vài ngày trước đó. Bởi vậy, ông tỏ ra bối rối. Họ nói với ông: Đúng rồi, trong phòng thí nghiệm, trong nhà máy của chúng ta, chúng ta sử dụng kẻ thù. Họ là tà ma, ác quỉ, kẻ thù, kẻ địch của chính quyền chúng ta. Chúng ta đưa họ vào làm việc để khai thác họ, nhưng anh, anh không có được nói chuyện với họ. Đó không phải là nhiệm vụ của anh. Họ thì nguy hiểm, họ là Cộng Sản, họ là những tên giết người. Bởi vậy, bắt họ làm việc nhưng không được nói chuyện với họ. Ông ta là một người vụng về, không tinh khôn lắm. Ông không phải là một tên Nazi. Ông có vài nét người. Ông thấy tôi không cạo râu, và hỏi. Tôi nói, coi này, tôi đâu có dao cạo râu, đâu có khăn mặt. Chúng tôi hoàn toàn trần truồng, bị tước đoạt hết thẩy, và thế là ông bắt tôi phải cạo râu hai lần trong một tuần. Mệnh lệnh này thì cũng chẳng ghê gớm gì, nhưng ít nhất, nó cũng là một dấu hiệu. Hơn nữa, ông thấy tôi đi guốc. Vừa ồn vừa khó chịu. Ông hỏi, tại sao. Tôi nói, ngay ngày đầu đến đây, là đã bị lột giầy. Guốc là tiêu chuẩn của chúng tôi. Ông kiếm giầy da cho tôi. Thật đỡ khổ, vì guốc đúng là một cực hình. Tôi vẫn còn những vết sẹo guốc. Nếu bạn đi không quen, chỉ chừng nửa dậm đường, là nó sẽ cứa nát chân. Rồi thêm bụi bặm, nhơ bẩn, và chân bạn sẽ nhiễm trùng. Có được giầy da, thì thật là đỡ khổ. Bởi vậy, tôi cảm thấy hàm ơn ông ta. Ông không phải thứ người can đảm. Ông sợ bọn SS, như tôi. Ông quan tâm đến chuyện, tôi làm việc có ích lợi, chứ không tìm cách trù giập, bách hại. Ông chẳng có gì chống Do Thái, chống tù nhân. Ông chỉ mong, chúng tôi là những công nhân làm việc có hiệu quả. Câu chuyện về ông ta, như được tôi kể trong Bảng Tuần Hoàn, The Periodic Table, là hoàn toàn có thực. Tôi chẳng có may mắn gặp lại ông sau chiến tranh. Ông chết trước vài ngày, trước cái ngày hẹn gặp nhau của chúng tôi. Ông điện thoại cho tôi từ một nhà chữa bệnh bằng nước suối khoáng, ở Đức, nơi ông đang phục hồi sức khoẻ. Như tôi được biết, cái chết của ông ta là tự nhiên. Nhưng tôi không biết có đúng như thế hay là không. Tôi để ngang như vậy, trong Bảng Tuần Hoàn... để bạn đọc có chút hồ nghi, như chính tôi cũng mơ mơ hồ hồ.
Primo Levi [trích The Paris Review, từ bài viết về nghệ thuật viết tiểu thuyết, The Art of Fiction CXL]
*
Đoạn trên, trích từ tuyển tập, về "đủ thứ trên đời", The Paris Review Book of Love, Sex, Betrayal, God, Death, War... , và thuộc về phần War, Chiến tranh.
Cũng trong phần, có trích đoạn, cuộc phỏng vấn nhà thơ phản quốc, Ezra Pound.
*
Người phỏng vấn: Hành động chính trị của ông mà mọi người còn nhớ, là, những bài phát thanh từ Ý, trong thời kỳ chiến tranh. Khi ông cho chơi những bài đó, ông có ý thức đến chuyện ông chơi cha đối với luật pháp Mẽo?
Pound: Không. Tôi hoàn toàn ngạc nhiên. Ông biết là tôi có lời hứa hẹn đó, you see that I had that promise. Tôi được giao cho cái sự tự do đó, về cái việc sử dụng cái micro đó, hai lần trong một tuần. "Anh ta [tức là tui] được yêu cầu, không được chơi một cái gì đi ngược lại với luơng tâm của anh ta, và đi ngược lại cái bổn phận của anh ta, như là một công dân Mẽo". Tôi nghĩ tôi đã làm đầy đủ hai điều đó [ I thought that covered it].
-Liệu luật Mẽo có cho ông cái quyền 'đem sự giúp đỡ và sự hài lòng thoải mái, đến cho kẻ thù', và kẻ thù ở đây, có phải là cái xứ sở chúng ta đang có chiến tranh với họ?
-Tôi nghĩ, lúc đó, tôi đang chiến đấu, cho một quan điểm mang tính định chế, a constitutional point. Tôi muốn nói, tôi có thể là một thằng quá cù lần, quá ngu ngốc, nhưng, chắc chắn, tôi không phạm tội phản quốc....
*
Gấu bỗng nhớ đến những hành động "đâm sau lưng chiến sĩ" của mấy ông VC nằm vùng, và của đám tinh anh bỏ chạy. Liệu đám khốn này, cũng chiến đấu cho một quan điểm có tính định chế: làm sao choàng cho được cái cùm định chế, là chủ nghĩa CS, lên đầu lên cổ, nhân dân Miền Nam?
Pound, ông tự nhận ông là thằng cù lần.
Đám kia, còn lâu mới dám thú nhận, họ làm điều ngu đần.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

TDT

Bi Khúc

Hoàng Hạc Lâu