Skip to main content

Old Tinvan




RIP
The navy pilot, senator and presidential candidate, died on August 25th, aged 81
Aug 26th 2018
Ai Điếu Mắc Ken
Cơ thể ông ta, dù 1 tí, 1 mảnh, đều sang sảng phán, tao chịu đựng.
Cái kiểu bước nhanh nhảu, hơi lắc lư, hai tay cứng ngắc, đôi vai khít, cái cười chặt chẽ, tất cả đều mang dấu ấn VC, Bắc Kít. Tay ngay đơ, 1 phần còn là do cú gẫy, khi máy bay bị bắn rớt, rồi sau đó bị VC trói, ngày lại ngày, trong nhà tù Hoả Lò. Được thả sau 5 năm rưỡi mà trong suốt thời gian đó, là tra tấn, và nhốt riêng, ông không làm sao giơ cánh tay lên cao, để chải tóc.
Tóc của ông thì cũng vậy, nước tù đầy biến thành trắng, dù khi ông ở quãng tuổi 30.
Hai đầu gối cũng có vấn đề. Nhưng không vì thế mà ông không thường xuyên đi lại giữa Grand Canyon và những ngọn đồi vùng sa mạc vùng Arizona, mảnh đất tuyệt vời mà ông là người đại diện tại Quốc Hội Mẽo hơn 30 năm
Xứ Bắc Kít của VC đã định nghĩa, nghiệp của ông, nghiệp, career, ở đây còn có nghĩa là nghiệp, theo nghĩa của chính chúng, tức là 1 cái gì không thể tránh được: Việt Nam mang đến cho ông khoảng đời đẹp nhất, khi ông từ chối được thả sớm, và tuyệt vời thay, nhờ thế, ông có được cái cảm quan nghiêm trọng về 1 trách nhiệm, một mục đích, được chia sẻ - được làm người, thì cứ gọi đại như thế - lớn hơn cả chính ông.




RIP
John McCain and the Lost Art of Decency
John McCain và Nghệ Thuật Đã Mất của Đạo Hạnh & Tao Nhã & Tương Kính...
In decades of covering politics, I’ve encountered no one else with McCain’s unflinching combination of bracing candor, impossibly high standards, and rueful self-recrimination.
[Tạm dịch: Trong những thập niên theo dõi, báo cáo chính trường, tôi chưa từng gặp 1 người nào như McCain; với ông, là 1 sự kết hợp cứng cỏi, của một tấm lòng bộc trực, những chuẩn mực bực cao bất khả, và 1 sự nhún mình trong khi cần chống trả]
https://www.theatlantic.com/…/the-tao-of-john-mccain/568576/
When his North Vietnamese captors demanded the names of his flight squadron, McCain recited the names of the Green Bay Packers offensive line, knowing that the false information would suffice (for the moment) to end their abuse. “There’s no bar fight he will walk away from,” his onetime political strategist John Weaver once told me.
To the last, it’s that fighting spirit that defines McCain. Nearly alone among his Republican Senate colleagues, he stood up to Donald Trump, depriving the president of a deciding vote on the repeal of Obamacare, and repeatedly rebuking him in no uncertain terms when he felt like it, memorably declaring that the president had “abased himself” in front of Vladimir Putin, a “tyrant.”






Ông nói, " Đạo đức là cấu trúc. Tôi chỉ có một sự tò mò lớn lao là hiểu biết những con người, một ao ước lớn lao là khai phá". Ông tính đem đến cho cái từ "đạo đức" này một ý nghĩa chi?

Naipaul: Một nhà văn mất mẹ nó ý thức đạo đức ở trong tác phẩm chẳng là gì dưới mắt tôi, tôi chẳng thèm quan tâm tới thứ nhà văn này. Evelyn Waugh? Tay này có một tham vọng đạo đức? Làm gì có. Nếu có, thì đó là cơ hội. Proust? Bạn đặt trọng tâm đạo đức tác phẩm của ông ta vào chỗ nào? Một thứ kịch xã hội?

Ông thực quá khắt khe với Proust.

Bà vợ, Nadira Naipaul, [tố thêm]: Còn Gabriel Garcia Marquez? Một thằng cha bất lương, bạn của lũ bạo chúa. Salman Rushdie hả? Một gã thủ dâm trí thức.
Vào năm 1967, trong cuốn Lần Viếng Thăm Thứ Nhì, một thứ phóng sự về Ấn Độ, ông đã từng nói: "Tất cả những tự thuật Ấn Độ đều được viết bởi, vẫn chỉ có một người: dở dang". Phải chăng, đây là định nghĩa Willie? [nhân vật chính trong Nửa Đời Nửa Đoạn, La Moitié d'une vie, tác phẩm của Naipaul].
Vâng, đúng như vậy. Cám ơn đã để ý tới điều này.
[Tạp Chí Văn Học Pháp, số Tháng Chín 2005. Naipaul trả lời phỏng vấn]
V.S. Naipaul, Poet of the Displaced

Ian Buruma   
V.S. Naipaul’s fastidiousness was legendary. I met him for the first time in Berlin, in 1991, when he was feted for the German edition of his latest book. A smiling young waitress offered him some decent white wine. Naipaul took the bottle from her hand, examined the label for some time, like a fine-art dealer inspecting a dubious piece, handed the bottle back, and said with considerable disdain: “I think perhaps later, perhaps later.” (Naipaul often repeated phrases.)
This kind of thing also found its way into his travel writing. He could work himself up into a rage about the quality of the towels in his hotel bathroom, or the slack service on an airline, or the poor food at a restaurant, as though these were personal affronts to him, the impeccably turned-out traveler.
Naipaul was nothing if not self-aware. In his first travel account of India, An Area of Darkness (1964), he describes a visit to his ancestral village in a poor, dusty part of Uttar Pradesh, where an old woman clutches Naipaul’s shiny English shoes. Naipaul feels overwhelmed, alienated, presumed upon. He wants to leave this remote place his grandfather left behind many years before. A young man wishes to hitch a ride to the nearest town. Naipaul says: “No, let the idler walk.” And so, he adds, “the visit ended, in futility and impatience, a gratuitous act of cruelty, self-reproach and flight.”
It is tempting to see Naipaul as a blimpish figure, aping the manners of British bigots; or as a fussy Brahmin, unwilling to eat from the same plates as lower castes. Both views miss the mark. Naipaul’s fastidiousness had more to do with what he called the “raw nerves” of a displaced colonial, a man born in a provincial outpost of empire, who had struggled against the indignities of racial prejudice to make his mark, to be a writer, to add his voice to what he saw as a universal civilization. Dirty towels, bad service, and the wretchedness of his ancestral land were insults to his sense of dignity, of having overcome so much.
These raw nerves did not make him into an apologist for empire, let alone for the horrors inflicted by white Europeans. On the contrary, he blamed the abject state of so many former colonies on imperial conquest. In The Loss of Eldorado (1969), a short history of his native Trinidad, he describes in great detail how waves of bloody conquest wiped out entire peoples and their cultures, leaving half-baked, dispossessed, rootless societies. Such societies have lost what Naipaul calls their “wholeness” and are prone to revolutionary fantasies and religious fanaticism.
Wholeness was an important idea to Naipaul. To him, it represented cultural memory, a settled sense of place and identity. History was important to him, as well as literary achievement upon which new generations of writers could build. It irked him that there was nothing for him to build on in Trinidad, apart from some vaguely recalled Brahmin rituals and books about a faraway European country where it rained all the time, a place he could only imagine. England, to him, represented a culture that was whole. And, from the distance of his childhood, so did India. (In fact, he knew more about ancient Rome, taught by a Latin teacher in Trinidad, than he did about either country.)
When he finally managed to go to India, he was disappointed. India was a “wounded civilization,” maimed by Muslim conquests and European colonialism. He realized he didn’t belong there, any more than in Trinidad or in England. And so he sought to find his place in the world through words. Books would be his escape from feeling rootless and superfluous. His father, Seepersad Naipaul, had tried to lift himself from his surroundings by writing journalism and short stories, which he hoped, in vain, to publish in England. Writing, to father and son, was more than a profession; it was a calling that conferred a kind of nobility.
Naipaul’s most famous novel, A House for Mr. Biswas (1961), drew on the father’s story of frustrated ambition. By going back into the world of his childhood, he found the words to create his own link to that universal literary civilization. He often told interviewers that he only existed in his books.
If raw nerves made him irascible at times, they also sharpened his vision. He understood people who were culturally dislocated and who tried to find solace in religious or political fantasies that were often borrowed from other places and ineptly mimicked. He described such delusions precisely and often comically. His sense of humor sometimes bordered on cruelty, and in interviews with liberal journalists it could take the form of calculated provocation. But his refusal to sentimentalize the wounds in postcolonial societies produced some of his most penetrating insights.
My favorite book by Naipaul is not A House for Mr. Biswas, or the later novel A Bend in the River (1979), his various books on India, or even his 1987 masterpiece The Enigma of Arrival, but a slender volume entitled Finding the Center (1984). It consists of two long essays, one about how he learned to become a writer, how he found his own voice, and the other about a trip to Ivory Coast in 1982. In the first piece, written out of unflinching self-knowledge, he gives a lucid account of the way he sees the world, and how he puts this in words. He travels to understand himself, as well as the politics and histories of the countries he visits. Following random encounters with people who interest him, he tries to understand how people see themselves in relation to the world they live in. But by doing so, he finds his own place, too, in his own inimitable words.
The second part of Finding the Center, called “The Crocodiles of Yamassoukro,” is a perfect example of his methods. It is a surprisingly sympathetic account of a messed-up African country, filled with foreigners as well as local people wrapped up in a variety of self-told stories, some of them fantastical, about how they see themselves fitting in. African Americans come in search of an imaginary Africa. A black woman from Martinique escapes in a private world of quasi-French snobbery. And the Africans themselves, in Naipaul’s vision, have held onto a “whole” culture under a thin layer of false mimicry. This culture of ancestral spirits comes alive at night, when the gimcrack modernity of daily urban life is forgotten.
Being in Africa reminds him of his childhood in Trinidad, when descendants of slaves turned the world upside down in carnivals, in which the oppressive white world ceased to exist and they reigned as African kings and queens. It is an oddly romantic vision of African life, this idea that something whole lurks under the surface of a half-made, borrowed civilization. Perhaps it is more telling of Naipaul’s own longings than of the reality of most people’s lives. If he is always clear-eyed about the pretentions of religious fanatics, Third World mimic men, and delusional political figures, his idea of wholeness can sound almost sentimental.

I remember being in a car with Naipaul one summer day in Wiltshire, England, near the cottage where he lived. He told me about his driver, a local man. The driver, he said, had a special bond with the rolling hills we were passing through. The man was aware of his ancestors buried under our feet. He belonged here. He felt the link with generations that had been here before him: “That is how he thinks, that is how he thinks.”
I am not convinced at all that this was the way Naipaul’s driver thought. But it was certainly the way he thought in the writer’s imagination. Naipaul was our greatest poet of the half-baked and the displaced. It was the imaginary wholeness of civilizations that sometimes led him astray. He became too sympathetic to the Hindu nationalism that is now poisoning India politics, as if a whole Hindu civilization were on the rise after centuries of alien Muslim or Western despoliations.
There is no such thing as a whole civilization. But some of Naipaul’s greatest literature came out of his yearning for it. Although he may, at times, have associated this with England or India, his imaginary civilization was not tied to any nation. It was a literary idea, secular, enlightened, passed on through writing. That is where he made his home, and that is where, in his books, he will live on.
August 13, 2018, 1:39 pm


Cái chuyện “cà chớn, phách lối, mất dậy…”, [fastidiousness: chảnh] của GCC - ấy chết xin lỗi, của Naipaul  - thì đúng là cả 1 giai thoại. Tôi lần đầu gặp ông ta ở Berlin, khi nhà xb tổ chức lễ ra mắt, bản tiếng Đức, cuốn tiểu thuyết mới nhất của ông. Một em đẹp như tiên, nụ cười rạng rỡ, mời ông ly rượu vang trắng, chắc không phải thứ tệ, Naipaul gỡ cái chai ra khỏi tay người đẹp, nhìn cái nhãn bằng 1 con mắt nghi ngờ của 1 tay nhà nghề trong việc kiểm tra thật-giả trong văn chương, nghệ thuật, rồi, trả lại chai rượu, và nói, với 1 cái giọng dè bỉu thật rõ nét, “lát nữa, lát nữa, em nhá… “, ông có tật cắn phải lưỡi của mình, không phải một, nhưng mà là, vài lần!

Note: Hai bài "điếu văn", bài trên, và bài của tờ Người Kinh Tế, quá tuyệt.
Trên Tin Văn, còn bài  "Duyên nợ văn chương", cũng thật tuyệt.
Trân trọng khoe hàng!

Pankaj Mishra giới thiệu tập tiểu luận Literary Occasions [nhà xb Vintage Canada, 2003], của V.S. Naipaul.

Ông nói, " Đạo đức là cấu trúc.
Quá tuyệt.
Brodsky, Mỹ là Mẹ của Đạo Hạnh, là cùng/cũng nghĩa như thế.
Nhưng phải Kafka, thì mới đẩy đến tận cùng của cái gọi là “kỹ thuật viết”:  Linh hồn của văn chương.

Bản thân Naipaul cũng bắt đầu bằng những cái bên ngoài của những sự vật, hy vọng từ đó tới được, qua văn chương, “một thế giới đầy đủ đợi chờ tôi ở đâu đó”. “Tôi giả dụ”, Naipaul viết, trong một tiểu luận về Conrad được xuất bản vào năm 1974, “bằng sự quái dị của mình, tôi nhìn ra, chính tôi, đến Anh Quốc, như tới một miền đất chỉ thuần có ở trong cõi văn chương, ở đó, chẳng bị trắc trở, khó khăn vì biến cố, tai nạn lịch sử  hay gốc gác, nền tảng, tôi làm ra một sự nghiệp văn chương, như là một nhà văn chính hiệu con nai vàng.” Nhưng hỡi ơi, thay vì vậy, một sự khiếp đảm chính trị [a political panic] tóm lấy ông, ngay vừa mới ló đầu ra khỏi cái thế giới tù đọng của vùng đất thuộc địa Trinidad. Dời đổi tới một thế giới lớn hơn, theo Naipaul, nghĩa là, ngộ ra rằng, có một lịch sử của đế quốc, và cái lịch sử này thì thật là độc địa, tàn nhẫn, và cùng lúc, thấm thía chỗ của mình, ở trong đó; trần truồng ra trước những xã hội nửa đời nửa đoạn, tức chỉ có một nửa, [half-made societies], tức những xã hội thuộc điạ: chúng cứ thường xuyên tự nhồi nặn lẫn nhau [“constantly made and unmade themselves”]: những phát giác đau thương như thế đó, thay vì dần dần lắng dịu đi, chúng lại càng trở nên nhức nhối hơn, khi ông dám chọn cho mình một ‘nghiệp văn”, ở Anh Quốc.
    Hầu như trơ cu lơ, đơn độc, giữa tất cả những nhà văn lớn viết bằng tiếng Anh, nhưng Conrad, chính ông ta có vẻ như đã giúp đỡ, và hiểu Naipaul và hoàn cảnh trớ trêu của ông, một tay lưu vong tới từ một vùng đất thuộc địa, và thấy mình đang loay hoay, kèn cựa, cố tìm cho bằng được cái chỗ đứng, như là một nhà văn, ở trong một đế quốc [thấy mình làm việc trong một thế giới và truyền thống văn học được nhào nặn bởi đế quốc … “who finds himself working in a world and literay tradition shaped by empire”]. Conrad là “nhà văn hiện đại đầu tiên” mà Naipaul đã được ông via của mình giới thiệu. Thoạt đầu, ông này làm Naipaul bị khớp, bởi “những câu chuyện bản thân chúng thật là giản dị, và luôn luôn, tới một giai đoạn nào đó, chúng trượt ra khỏi tôi”. Sau đó, Naipaul giản dị hoá vấn đề, bằng cách, khoán trắng cho những sự kiện. Đọc Trái Tim Của Bóng Đen, ông coi, nó là như vậy đấy: nền tảng của cuốn tiểu thuyết là Phi Châu - một vùng đất bại hoại bởi sự cướp bóc, bóc lột, và bởi sự độc ác “có môn bài” [licensed cruelty].
    Du lịch và viết, đối với Naipaul, là một cách để bầy ra sự ngây thơ chính trị này, của người thuộc địa. Theo Naipaul, giá trị của Conrad – cũng là một kẻ lạ, một kẻ ở bên ngoài nước Anh, và một nhà du lịch kinh nghiệm đầy mình, ở Á Châu và Phi Châu - nằm ở trong sự kiện là, “ngó bất cứ chỗ nào, thì ông ta cũng đã ở đó, trước tôi.”, “ông ta như đã đi guốc vào trong bụng tôi, theo nghĩa, ông là một trạm chung chuyển, “một kẻ trung gian, về thế giới của tôi”, về “những nơi chốn tối tăm, xa vời”, ở đó, những con người, “bị chối từ, vì bất cứ một lý do nào, một cái nhìn thật rõ ràng về thế giới”.
    Naipaul coi tác phẩm của Conrad, là đã “thâm nhập vào rất nhiều góc thế giới, mà ông ta thấy, đen thui ở đó.”  Naipaul coi đây là một sự kiện mà ông gọi là “một đề tài suy tư theo kiểu Conrad”; “nó nói cho chúng ta một điều”, Naipaul viết, “về thế giới mới của chúng ta”. Chưa từng có một nhà văn nào suy tư về những trò tiếu lâm, tức cười, trớ trêu này, của lịch sử, suy tư dai như đỉa đói, như là Naipaul, nhưng sự sống động ở nơi ông, có vẻ như đối nghịch với vẻ trầm tĩnh [calm] của Conrad, và cùng với vẻ trầm tĩnh của ông nhà văn Hồng Mao này, là nỗi buồn nhẹ nhàng của một kẻ tự mãn, tự lấy làm hài lòng về chính mình. Có vẻ như Naipaul cố làm sáng mãi ra, và đào sâu thêm mãi, tri thức và kinh nghiệm, hai món này, đối với Conrad, ông coi như đã hoàn tất đầy đủ, và cứng như đinh đóng cột. Bó trọn gói, những cuốn sách của Naipaul không chỉ miêu tả nhưng mà còn khuấy động, và cho thấy, bằng cách nào, khởi từ “những nơi chốn tối tăm và xa xôi” của Conrad”, ông dần dà mò về phiá, ở đó, có một cái nhìn thật là rõ ràng về thế giới [a clear vision of the world]. Chẳng có điểm nghỉ ngơi, trong chuyến đi này, mà bây giờ, cuộc đi này, tức cuời thay, có vẻ như là một hành trình lật ngược chuyến đi tới trái tim của bóng đen, của Conrad. Mỗi cuốn sách, là một bắt đầu mới, nó tháo bung những gì trước nó. Điều này giải thích bi kịch không bao giờ chấm dứt, và cứ thế lập đi lập lại mãi, của Sự Tới [arrival], nó có vẻ như là một ám ảnh khởi nghiệp văn, ở trong những tác phẩm của Naipaul.
    "Có đến một nửa những tác phẩm của một nhà văn, là chỉ để loay hoay khám phá đề tài”, Naipaul viết, trong “Lời Mở cho một Tự Thuật”. Nhưng văn nghiệp của chính ông cho thấy, một sự khám phá ra như thế có thể chiếm cứ hầu như trọn cuộc đời của một nhà văn, và cũng còn tạo nên, cùng lúc, tác phẩm của người đó - đặc biệt đối với một nhà văn theo kiểu Naipaul: một nhà văn bán xới, vừa độc nhất, vừa đa đoan rắc rối làm sao [a writer as uniquely and diversely displayed as Naipaul], một nhà văn mà, không như những nhà văn Nga xô thế kỷ 19, chẳng hề có một truyền thống văn học phát triển nào, mà cũng chẳng có một xứ sở rộng lớn đa đoan phức tạp nào, để mà “trông cậy vào đó, và đòi hỏi”.
    Để nhận ra những sắc thái gẫy vụn, rã rời của căn cước của bạn; để nhìn ra, bằng cách nào những mảnh vụn đó làm cho bạn trở thành là bạn; để hiểu rõ, điều gì cần thiết ở cái quá khứ đau đớn, và khó chịu và chấp nhận nó, như là một phần của hiện hữu của bạn - một hiện hữu như là một tiến trình không ngừng nghỉ, một tiến trình, thực sự mà nói, của hồi tưởng, của tái cấu tạo một cái tôi cá thể nằm dưới sâu trong căn nhà lịch sử của nó, đó là điều phần lớn tác phẩm của Naipaul say mê dấn mãi vào. Người kể chuyện của nhà văn Pháp Proust, ở trong Đi Tìm Một Thời Gian Đã Mất, định nghĩa, cũng một sợi dây nối kết sống động như vậy, giữa hồi nhớ, tri-thức-về-mình, và nỗ lực văn chương, khi anh ta nói, sáng tạo ra một nghệ phẩm cũng đồng nghĩa với khám phá ra cuộc đời thực của chúng ta, cái tôi thực của chúng ta, và, “chúng ta chẳng tự do một tí nào, theo nghĩa, chúng ta không chọn lựa, bằng cách nào, chúng ta sẽ làm đời mình, bởi vì nó có từ trước, và do đó, chúng ta bị bắt buộc phải làm ra đời mình. Và, đời của mình thì vừa cần thiếu, vừa trốn biệt đâu đâu,  và, nếu làm ra đời mình là luật sinh tồn của thiên nhiên, nếu như vậy, làm đời mình, có nghĩa là, khám phá ra nó.”

Note:

Cái thế giới 1 nửa, mà cái thiếu nhất của nó, là đạo hạnh, mà đạo hạnh, là cấu trúc, 1 trong cái xứ như thế, là xứ Mít,  của chúng ta, trong nó, khủng hơn hết, là cái phần Bắc Kít của nó, đúng là như thế đó. Cái gọi là 4 ngàn năm văn hiến, được gọi thẳng thừng ra ở đây, là, chưa từng biết đến thế nào là dân chủ, thế nào là quyền con người, sợ còn chẳng biết thế nào là tính người, tình người!
Đâu chỉ 1 Naipaul.
Rushdie cũng nhận ra điều này:
Ở Mỹ Châu La Tinh, thực tại biến dạng do chính trị nhiều hơn là do văn hóa. Sự thực được bưng bít đến nỗi không còn biết đâu là sự thực. Cuối cùng chỉ còn một sự thực độc nhất, đó là lúc nào người ta cũng nói dối. Những tác phẩm của Garcia Marquez không có tương quan trực tiếp tới chính trị, nhưng chúng đề cập tới những vấn đề đại chúng bằng những ẩn dụ. Chủ nghĩa hiện thực huyền ảo là một khai triển chiết ra từ chủ nghĩa siêu thực; một chủ nghĩa siêu thực diễn tả lương tâm đích thực của Thế Giới Thứ Ba, tức là của những xã hội được tạo thành "có một nửa", trong đó, cái cũ có vẻ như không thực chống lại cái mới làm người ta sợ, trong đó sự tham nhũng, thối nát "công cộng" của đám cầm quyền và nỗi khiếp sợ "riêng tư" của từng người dân, tất cả đều trở thành hiển nhiên. Trong thế giới tiểu thuyết của Garcia Marquez, những điều vô lý, những chuyện không thể xẩy ra, đều xẩy ra hoài hoài, ngay giữa ban ngày ban mặt. Thật hết sức lầm lẫn, nếu coi vũ trụ văn chương của ông là một hệ thống bịa đặt, khép kín. Nó không được viết ở trên mảnh đất nào khác mà chính là mảnh đất chúng ta đang sống. Macondo có thực. Và đó tính nhiệm mầu của ông.

Tình yêu và những quỷ dữ khác

Lẽ tất nhiên, phán như thế thí quá là quá đáng. Người phán tuyệt nhất về xứ Bắc Kít, với GCC, là Milosz, khi ông vinh danh quê hương của ông, và cùng với ông, là Coetzee, khi định nghĩa thế nào là cổ điển.
Theo nghĩa đó, Kis đọc Nabokov, và gọi đó là lòng hoài nhớ. Đọc bài của ông, thì Gấu thấy mình bớt khe khắt với Nabokov, và thứ văn chương gọi là hoài cổ, đúng thứ văn chương mà LMH [Lê Minh Hà] đang viết về 1 miền đất, trước khi bị VC xóa sổ.

Danilo Kis
When Kis died in Paris in 1989, the Belgrade press went into national mourning. The renegade star of Yugoslav literature had been extinguished. Safely dead, he could be eulogized by the mediocrities who had always envied him and had engineered his literary excommunication, and who would then proceed-as Yugoslavia fell apart-to become official writers of the new post- Communist, national chauvinist order. Kis is, of course, admired by everyone who genuinely cares about literature, in Belgrade as elsewhere. The place in the former Yugoslavia where he was and is perhaps most ardently admired is Sarajevo. Literary people there did not exactly ply me with questions about American literature when I went to Sarajevo for the first time in April 1993. But they were extremely impressed that I'd had the privilege of being a friend of Danilo Kis. In besieged Sarajevo people think a lot about Danilo Kis. His fervent screed against nationalism, incorporated into The Anatomy Lesson, is one of the two prophetic texts-the other is a story by Andric, "A Letter from 1920"-that one hears most often cited. As secular, multi-ethnic Bosnia-Yugoslavia's Yugoslavia-is crushed under the new imperative of one ethnicity lone state, Kis is more present than ever. He deserves to be a hero in Sarajevo, whose struggle to survive embodies the honor of Europe.
Unfortunately, the honor of Europe has been lost at Sarajevo. Kis and like-minded writers who spoke up against nationalism and fomented-from-the-top ethnic hatreds could not save Europe's honor, Europe's better idea. But it is not true that, to paraphrase Auden, a great writer does not make anything happen. At the end of the century, which is the end of many things, literature, too, is besieged. The work of Danilo Kis preserves the honor of literature.
Susan Sontag
Khi Kis mất ở Paris năm 1989, báo chí Belgrade bèn đi 1 đường tưởng niệm tầm cỡ quốc gia: Ngôi sao văn học đỉnh cao, thoái hóa, đồi trụy Ngụy nghiệc cái con mẹ gì đó… đã tắt lịm! Đám nhà văn thuộc Hội Nhà Thổ suốt đời thèm viết được, chỉ 1 câu văn của ông, bèn thổi ông tới trời, và biến ông, vốn nhà văn Ngụy, thành nhà văn của nhà nước VC hậu 30 Tháng Tư 1975!
Lẽ tất nhhiên Kis được yêu mến bởi bất cứ 1 ai thực sự yêu văn chương và “care” về nó, ở Belgrade hay bất cứ nơi nào. Nơi chốn thuộc Cựu Nam Tư mà ông được yêu mến nhất là Sarajevo. Khi tôi [Susan Sontag] tới đó vào Tháng Tư 1993, đám nhà văn ở đó bị ấn tượng nặng khi biết tôi hân hạnh được là bạn của Kis.
Various critics have seen a relationship between your novels and those of Hermann Broch, Bruno Schulz, and Kafka. Do you think there is a Central European tradition-and, if so, how would you describe it?
I have nothing against the notion of Central Europe - on the contrary, I think that I am a Central European writer, according to my origins, especially my literary origins. It's very hard to define what being Central European means, but in my case there were three components. There's the fact that I'm half-Jewish, or Jewish, if you prefer; that I lived in both Hungary and Yugoslavia and that, growing up, I read in two languages and literatures; and that I encountered Western, Russian, and Jewish literature in this central area between Budapest, Vienna, Zagreb, Belgrade, etc. In terms of my education, I'm from this territory. If there's a different style and sensibility that sets me apart from Serbian or Yugoslav literature, one might call it this Central European complex. I find that I am a Central European writer to the core, but it's hard to define, beyond what I've said, what that means to me and where it comes from.

*

Note: GCC biết đến cái tên của me-xừ Herbert qua bài viết của Coetzee, Thế nào là cổ điển ? Cũng tính đọc, vì nghĩ Mít rất cần (1), nhưng lại nhớ đến cái "deal" với me-xừ Thượng Đế, giống như anh chàng trong truyện ngắn Phép Lạ Bí Ẩn của Borges, mi chỉ được ta cho phép tới năm 70, là lên tầu suốt đấy nhé!
Bữa nay, thì lại nhớ đến cái tay triết gia bị tử hình, vào giờ chót còn xin học 1 điệu nhạc…  sến!
Thế là đành tặc lưỡi bệ cuốn sách vừa dày, vừa nặng ký, vừa nặng tiền về nhà mình!
Còn số báo thì lại rẻ quá. Spring 2012, như vậy là ba tháng mới ra 1 kỳ, vậy mà giá thua 1 số The New Yorker, ra hàng tuần.
Có hai bài phỏng vấn, đọc sơ sơ thấy được quá!

(1)
Với Herbert, đối nghịch Cổ Điển không phải Lãng Mạn, mà là Man Rợ. Với nhà thơ Ba Lan, viết từ mảnh đất văn hóa Tây Phương không ngừng quần thảo với những láng giềng man rợ, không phải cứ có được một vài tính cách quí báu nào đó, là làm cho cổ điển sống sót man rợ.
Nhưng đúng hơn là như thế này: Cái sống sót những xấu xa tồi tệ nhất của chủ nghĩa man rợ, và cứ thế sống sót, đời này qua đời khác, bởi những con người nhất quyết không chịu buông xuôi, nhất quyết bám chặt lấy, với bất cứ mọi tổn thất, (at all costs), cái mà con người quyết giữ đó, được gọi là Cổ Điển
  (2)
Bạn phải đọc thêm câu này, của Milosz, thì mới thấm ý, và cùng gật gù thông cảm với thằng cu Gấu nhà quê, Bắc Kít:

It is good to be born in a small country where nature is on a human scale, where various languages and religions have coexisted for centuries. I am thinking here of Lithuania, a land of myth and poetry.
Thật lốt lành khi sinh ra tại một xứ nhỏ, nơi thiên nhiên không so le với con người, nơi ngôn ngữ và tôn giáo cùng rong ruổi bên nhau qua nhiều đời. Tôi đang nghĩ về Lithuania, miền đất của huyền thoại và thi ca.
Czeslaw Milosz, Diễn văn Nobel văn chương.
(2)
What does it mean in living terms to say that the classic is what survives? How does such a conception of the classic manifest itself in people's lives?
For the most serious answer to this question, we cannot do better than turn to the great poet of the classic of our own times, the Pole Zbigniew Herbert. To Herbert, the opposite of the classic is not the Romantic but the barbarian; furthermore, classic versus barbarian is not so much an opposition as a confrontation. Herbert writes from the historical perspective of Poland, a country with an embattled Western culture caught between intermittently bar­barous neighbors. It is not the possession of some essential quality that, in Herbert's eyes, makes it possible for the classic to withstand the assault of barbarism. Rather, what survives the worst of barbarism, surviving because generations of people cannot afford to let go of it and therefore hold on to it at all costs-that is the classic.
Coetzee: What is a classic ? [Thế nào là 1 nhà cổ điển ?]
Không phải tự nhiên mà Coetzee phong cho Herbert là nhà cổ điển vĩ đại nhất của thời đại chúng ta.
Trong bài giới thiệu Herbert, Charles Simic cho biết, thơ rất ư đầu đời của Herbert lèm bèm về cổ điển:
From the very beginning, Herbert's poems had one notable quality; many of them dealt with Greek and Roman antiquity. These were not the reverential versions of ancient myths and historical events one normally encounters in poetry in which the poet neither questions the philosophical nor the ethical premises of the classical models, but were ironic reevalua­tions from the point of view of someone who had experienced modern wars and revolutions and who knew well that true to Homeric tradition only the high and mighty are usually glorified and lamented in their death and never the mounds of their anonymous victims. What drew him to the classics, nevertheless, is the recognition that these tales and legends con­tain all the essential human experiences. To have a historical conscious­ness meant seeing the continuity of the past as well as recognizing the continuity and the inescapable presence of past errors, crimes, but also the examples of courage and wisdom in our contemporary lives. History is the balance sheet of conscience. It condemns, reminds, robs us of peace, and also enlightens us now and then. In his view, our predicament has always been both tragic and comic. Even the old gods ended just like us.

Even the old gods ended just like us.
Ngay cả những vị thần cổ xưa chấm dứt đúng như chúng ta.

Tuyệt.

Nhìn như thế, thì hoài cổ có nghĩa là, chết như những vị thần cổ xưa của 1 miền đất.
Milosz đã diễn tả tâm trạng này, qua tình cảnh 1 gia đình, ở 1 sân ga, từ đâu chuyển về Lò Thiêu.
Chỉ 1 dúm người trong 1 gia đình, cố túm tụm lại, trước khi bị hủy diệt, trước hỗn loạn.
Bà cụ Gấu, trước khi vô Nam, cố gặp lại bà chị Gấu, nữ anh hùng thồ hàng chiến dịch Điện Biên Phủ. Bà cụ nói với con gái, thà chết 1 đống còn hơn sống 1 người. Bà chị Gấu lắc đầu, vì còn mê “phong trào”.
Lần Gấu trở lại đất Bắc, bà chị than, đúng ra là phải đi theo mẹ!

Gấu sợ rằng xứ Bắc Kít, và cùng với nó, cả nước Mít, đang ở vào bước ngoặt vĩ đại, trước khi thở hắt ra 1 phát, rồi… đi!
Tuyet Nguyen to Quoc Tru Nguyen
2 hrs
CHÚC MỪNG SINH NHẬT QUOC TRU NGUYEN QUÝ MẾN
CHÚC NHÀ THƠ MẠNH GIỎI,THỎA CHÍ BÌNH SINH ĐẾN TRĂM TUỔI .
Tks!
NQT





V.S. Naipaul, 1968
V.S. Naipaul, Poet of the Displaced

Ian Buruma   
V.S. Naipaul’s fastidiousness was legendary. I met him for the first time in Berlin, in 1991, when he was feted for the German edition of his latest book. A smiling young waitress offered him some decent white wine. Naipaul took the bottle from her hand, examined the label for some time, like a fine-art dealer inspecting a dubious piece, handed the bottle back, and said with considerable disdain: “I think perhaps later, perhaps later.” (Naipaul often repeated phrases.)
This kind of thing also found its way into his travel writing. He could work himself up into a rage about the quality of the towels in his hotel bathroom, or the slack service on an airline, or the poor food at a restaurant, as though these were personal affronts to him, the impeccably turned-out traveler.
Naipaul was nothing if not self-aware. In his first travel account of India, An Area of Darkness (1964), he describes a visit to his ancestral village in a poor, dusty part of Uttar Pradesh, where an old woman clutches Naipaul’s shiny English shoes. Naipaul feels overwhelmed, alienated, presumed upon. He wants to leave this remote place his grandfather left behind many years before. A young man wishes to hitch a ride to the nearest town. Naipaul says: “No, let the idler walk.” And so, he adds, “the visit ended, in futility and impatience, a gratuitous act of cruelty, self-reproach and flight.”
It is tempting to see Naipaul as a blimpish figure, aping the manners of British bigots; or as a fussy Brahmin, unwilling to eat from the same plates as lower castes. Both views miss the mark. Naipaul’s fastidiousness had more to do with what he called the “raw nerves” of a displaced colonial, a man born in a provincial outpost of empire, who had struggled against the indignities of racial prejudice to make his mark, to be a writer, to add his voice to what he saw as a universal civilization. Dirty towels, bad service, and the wretchedness of his ancestral land were insults to his sense of dignity, of having overcome so much.
These raw nerves did not make him into an apologist for empire, let alone for the horrors inflicted by white Europeans. On the contrary, he blamed the abject state of so many former colonies on imperial conquest. In The Loss of Eldorado (1969), a short history of his native Trinidad, he describes in great detail how waves of bloody conquest wiped out entire peoples and their cultures, leaving half-baked, dispossessed, rootless societies. Such societies have lost what Naipaul calls their “wholeness” and are prone to revolutionary fantasies and religious fanaticism.
Wholeness was an important idea to Naipaul. To him, it represented cultural memory, a settled sense of place and identity. History was important to him, as well as literary achievement upon which new generations of writers could build. It irked him that there was nothing for him to build on in Trinidad, apart from some vaguely recalled Brahmin rituals and books about a faraway European country where it rained all the time, a place he could only imagine. England, to him, represented a culture that was whole. And, from the distance of his childhood, so did India. (In fact, he knew more about ancient Rome, taught by a Latin teacher in Trinidad, than he did about either country.)
When he finally managed to go to India, he was disappointed. India was a “wounded civilization,” maimed by Muslim conquests and European colonialism. He realized he didn’t belong there, any more than in Trinidad or in England. And so he sought to find his place in the world through words. Books would be his escape from feeling rootless and superfluous. His father, Seepersad Naipaul, had tried to lift himself from his surroundings by writing journalism and short stories, which he hoped, in vain, to publish in England. Writing, to father and son, was more than a profession; it was a calling that conferred a kind of nobility.
Naipaul’s most famous novel, A House for Mr. Biswas (1961), drew on the father’s story of frustrated ambition. By going back into the world of his childhood, he found the words to create his own link to that universal literary civilization. He often told interviewers that he only existed in his books.
If raw nerves made him irascible at times, they also sharpened his vision. He understood people who were culturally dislocated and who tried to find solace in religious or political fantasies that were often borrowed from other places and ineptly mimicked. He described such delusions precisely and often comically. His sense of humor sometimes bordered on cruelty, and in interviews with liberal journalists it could take the form of calculated provocation. But his refusal to sentimentalize the wounds in postcolonial societies produced some of his most penetrating insights.
My favorite book by Naipaul is not A House for Mr. Biswas, or the later novel A Bend in the River (1979), his various books on India, or even his 1987 masterpiece The Enigma of Arrival, but a slender volume entitled Finding the Center (1984). It consists of two long essays, one about how he learned to become a writer, how he found his own voice, and the other about a trip to Ivory Coast in 1982. In the first piece, written out of unflinching self-knowledge, he gives a lucid account of the way he sees the world, and how he puts this in words. He travels to understand himself, as well as the politics and histories of the countries he visits. Following random encounters with people who interest him, he tries to understand how people see themselves in relation to the world they live in. But by doing so, he finds his own place, too, in his own inimitable words.
The second part of Finding the Center, called “The Crocodiles of Yamassoukro,” is a perfect example of his methods. It is a surprisingly sympathetic account of a messed-up African country, filled with foreigners as well as local people wrapped up in a variety of self-told stories, some of them fantastical, about how they see themselves fitting in. African Americans come in search of an imaginary Africa. A black woman from Martinique escapes in a private world of quasi-French snobbery. And the Africans themselves, in Naipaul’s vision, have held onto a “whole” culture under a thin layer of false mimicry. This culture of ancestral spirits comes alive at night, when the gimcrack modernity of daily urban life is forgotten.
Being in Africa reminds him of his childhood in Trinidad, when descendants of slaves turned the world upside down in carnivals, in which the oppressive white world ceased to exist and they reigned as African kings and queens. It is an oddly romantic vision of African life, this idea that something whole lurks under the surface of a half-made, borrowed civilization. Perhaps it is more telling of Naipaul’s own longings than of the reality of most people’s lives. If he is always clear-eyed about the pretentions of religious fanatics, Third World mimic men, and delusional political figures, his idea of wholeness can sound almost sentimental.

I remember being in a car with Naipaul one summer day in Wiltshire, England, near the cottage where he lived. He told me about his driver, a local man. The driver, he said, had a special bond with the rolling hills we were passing through. The man was aware of his ancestors buried under our feet. He belonged here. He felt the link with generations that had been here before him: “That is how he thinks, that is how he thinks.”
I am not convinced at all that this was the way Naipaul’s driver thought. But it was certainly the way he thought in the writer’s imagination. Naipaul was our greatest poet of the half-baked and the displaced. It was the imaginary wholeness of civilizations that sometimes led him astray. He became too sympathetic to the Hindu nationalism that is now poisoning India politics, as if a whole Hindu civilization were on the rise after centuries of alien Muslim or Western despoliations.
There is no such thing as a whole civilization. But some of Naipaul’s greatest literature came out of his yearning for it. Although he may, at times, have associated this with England or India, his imaginary civilization was not tied to any nation. It was a literary idea, secular, enlightened, passed on through writing. That is where he made his home, and that is where, in his books, he will live on.
August 13, 2018, 1:39 pm



https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/08/15/naipaul-in-the-review/ Aug 16th 2018
https://www.economist.com/…/…/vs-naipaul-died-on-august-11th

No settled place!

Chẳng có nơi nào để mà định cư cả!




HE WAS struck again and again by the wonder of being in his own house, the audacity of it: to walk down a farm track in Wiltshire to his own front gate, to close his doors and windows on his own space, privacy and neatness, to walk on cream carpet through book-lined rooms where, still in a towelling robe at noon, he could summon a wife to make coffee or take dictation. Outside, he could wander over lawns to the manor house, or a lake where swans glided, or visit the small building that served as his wine cellar. Vidia, his friends called him; he disliked his name, but liked the derivation, from the Sanskrit for seeing and knowing. He looked hard, with his eagle stare, and saw things as they were.
The house, which he rented, was paid for by his books, more than 30 of them. He had not taken up writing to get rich or win awards; that was a dreadful thought. Dreadful! To write was a vocation. Nonetheless his fourth book, “A House for Mr Biswas”, based on his father’s search for a settled place, had luckily propelled him to fame, and in 2001 he had won the Nobel prize for literature. He had been knighted, too, though he did not care to use the title. Hence the country cottage, as well as a duplex in Chelsea. For, as Mr Biswas said, “how terrible it would have been…to have lived without even attempting to lay claim to one’s portion of the earth.”
Which portion of the earth, though, was the question. Mr Naipaul’s ancestors were Indian, but that part lay in darkness, pierced only by his grandmother’s prayers and quaint rituals of eating. Journeys to India later, which resulted in three books excoriating the place, convinced him that this was not his home and never could be. He was repelled by the slums, the open defecation (picking his fastidious way through butts and twists of human excrement), and by the failure of Indian civilisation to defend itself. His place of birth and growth was Trinidad, principally Port of Spain, the humid, squalid, happy-go-lucky city, sticky with mangoes and loud with the beat of rain on corrugated iron, that provided the comedy in “Biswas” and “Miguel Street”. But he had to leave. England was his lure, as for all bright colonial boys who did not know their place, and his Trinidadian accent soon vanished in high-class articulation; but Oxford was wretched and London disappointing. He kept leaving, travelling, propelled by restlessness. Books resulted, but not calm. Not calm.
Much of his agitation, even to tears, came from the urge to write itself; what he was to write about, and in what form. The novel was exhausted. Modernism was dead. Yet literature had taken hold of him, a noble purpose to his life, the call of greatness. He had moved slowly into writing, first fascinated by the mere shapes of the letters, requesting pens, Waterman ink and ruled exercise books to depict them; then intrigued by the stories his father read to him; then, in London, banging out his first attempts on a BBC typewriter. For a long time he failed to devise a story. Beginnings were laborious, punctuation sacred: he filleted an American editor for removing his semicolons, “with all their different shades of pause”. Once going, though, he wrote at speed, hoping to reach that state of exaltation when he would understand himself, as well as his subject.
Truth-telling, defying the darkness, was his purpose. His travels through the post-colonial world, to India, Africa, the Caribbean and South America, made him furious: furious that formerly colonised peoples were content to lose their history and dignity, to be used and abandoned, and to build no institutions of their own, like the Africans of “In a Free State” squealing in their forest-language in the kitchens of tourist hotels. He mourned the relics of colonial rule, the overgrown gardens and collapsed polo pavilions, the mock-Tudor lodges and faded Victorian bric-à-brac he saw in Bundi or Kampala; but even more than these, the loss of human potential.
Many people were offended, and he cared not a whit whether they were or not. It was his duty and his gift to describe things exactly: whether the marbled endpaper of a dusty book, the stink of bed bugs and kerosene, the way that purple jacaranda flowers shone against rocks after rain, or the stupidity of most people. He resisted all editing, of writing or opinions. Without apology, he also slapped his mistress once until his hand hurt. Severity and pride came naturally to his all-seeing self.
To the plantation
The further purpose of writing was to give order to his life. He carefully recorded all events, either in his memory for constant replays or in small black notebooks consigned to his inside jacket pocket. Converting these to prose imposed a shape on disorder; it provided a structure, a shelter, protection. His rootless autobiographical heroes often dreamed of such calm places: a cottage on a hill, with a fire lit, approached at night through rain; a room furnished all in white, looking towards the sea; or in “The Mimic Men” the most alluring vision, an estate house on a Caribbean island among cocoa groves and giant immortelle trees, whose yellow and orange flowers floated down on the woods. Though he ended his days in Wiltshire, more or less content, it was somebody else’s sun he saw there, and somebody else’s history. His deep centre remained the place from which he had fled.
Note: Bài ai điếu quá tuyệt. Bài sau đây, cũng không thua.


Naipaul thi sĩ bán xới [không có 1 nơi chốn để mà cắm dùi]
V.S. Naipaul’s fastidiousness was legendary. I met him for the first time in Berlin, in 1991, when he was feted for the German edition of his latest book. A smiling young waitress offered him some decent white wine. Naipaul took the bottle from her hand, examined the label for some time, like a fine-art dealer inspecting a dubious piece, handed the bottle back, and said with considerable disdain: “I think perhaps later, perhaps later.” (Naipaul often repeated phrases.)
This kind of thing also found its way into his travel writing. He could work himself up into a rage about the quality of the towels in his hotel bathroom, or the slack service on an airline, or the poor food at a restaurant, as though these were personal affronts to him, the impeccably turned-out traveler.
Naipaul was nothing if not self-aware. In his first travel account of India, An Area of Darkness (1964), he describes a visit to his ancestral village in a poor, dusty part of Uttar Pradesh, where an old woman clutches Naipaul’s shiny English shoes. Naipaul feels overwhelmed, alienated, presumed upon. He wants to leave this remote place his grandfather left behind many years before. A young man wishes to hitch a ride to the nearest town. Naipaul says: “No, let the idler walk.” And so, he adds, “the visit ended, in futility and impatience, a gratuitous act of cruelty, self-reproach and flight.”
It is tempting to see Naipaul as a blimpish figure, aping the manners of British bigots; or as a fussy Brahmin, unwilling to eat from the same plates as lower castes. Both views miss the mark. Naipaul’s fastidiousness had more to do with what he called the “raw nerves” of a displaced colonial, a man born in a provincial outpost of empire, who had struggled against the indignities of racial prejudice to make his mark, to be a writer, to add his voice to what he saw as a universal civilization. Dirty towels, bad service, and the wretchedness of his ancestral land were insults to his sense of dignity, of having overcome so much.
These raw nerves did not make him into an apologist for empire, let alone for the horrors inflicted by white Europeans. On the contrary, he blamed the abject state of so many former colonies on imperial conquest. In The Loss of Eldorado (1969), a short history of his native Trinidad, he describes in great detail how waves of bloody conquest wiped out entire peoples and their cultures, leaving half-baked, dispossessed, rootless societies. Such societies have lost what Naipaul calls their “wholeness” and are prone to revolutionary fantasies and religious fanaticism.
Wholeness was an important idea to Naipaul. To him, it represented cultural memory, a settled sense of place and identity. History was important to him, as well as literary achievement upon which new generations of writers could build. It irked him that there was nothing for him to build on in Trinidad, apart from some vaguely recalled Brahmin rituals and books about a faraway European country where it rained all the time, a place he could only imagine. England, to him, represented a culture that was whole. And, from the distance of his childhood, so did India. (In fact, he knew more about ancient Rome, taught by a Latin teacher in Trinidad, than he did about either country.)
When he finally managed to go to India, he was disappointed. India was a “wounded civilization,” maimed by Muslim conquests and European colonialism. He realized he didn’t belong there, any more than in Trinidad or in England. And so he sought to find his place in the world through words. Books would be his escape from feeling rootless and superfluous. His father, Seepersad Naipaul, had tried to lift himself from his surroundings by writing journalism and short stories, which he hoped, in vain, to publish in England. Writing, to father and son, was more than a profession; it was a calling that conferred a kind of nobility.
Naipaul’s most famous novel, A House for Mr. Biswas (1961), drew on the father’s story of frustrated ambition. By going back into the world of his childhood, he found the words to create his own link to that universal literary civilization. He often told interviewers that he only existed in his books.
If raw nerves made him irascible at times, they also sharpened his vision. He understood people who were culturally dislocated and who tried to find solace in religious or political fantasies that were often borrowed from other places and ineptly mimicked. He described such delusions precisely and often comically. His sense of humor sometimes bordered on cruelty, and in interviews with liberal journalists it could take the form of calculated provocation. But his refusal to sentimentalize the wounds in postcolonial societies produced some of his most penetrating insights.
My favorite book by Naipaul is not A House for Mr. Biswas, or the later novel A Bend in the River (1979), his various books on India, or even his 1987 masterpiece The Enigma of Arrival, but a slender volume entitled Finding the Center (1984). It consists of two long essays, one about how he learned to become a writer, how he found his own voice, and the other about a trip to Ivory Coast in 1982. In the first piece, written out of unflinching self-knowledge, he gives a lucid account of the way he sees the world, and how he puts this in words. He travels to understand himself, as well as the politics and histories of the countries he visits. Following random encounters with people who interest him, he tries to understand how people see themselves in relation to the world they live in. But by doing so, he finds his own place, too, in his own inimitable words.
The second part of Finding the Center, called “The Crocodiles of Yamassoukro,” is a perfect example of his methods. It is a surprisingly sympathetic account of a messed-up African country, filled with foreigners as well as local people wrapped up in a variety of self-told stories, some of them fantastical, about how they see themselves fitting in. African Americans come in search of an imaginary Africa. A black woman from Martinique escapes in a private world of quasi-French snobbery. And the Africans themselves, in Naipaul’s vision, have held onto a “whole” culture under a thin layer of false mimicry. This culture of ancestral spirits comes alive at night, when the gimcrack modernity of daily urban life is forgotten.
Being in Africa reminds him of his childhood in Trinidad, when descendants of slaves turned the world upside down in carnivals, in which the oppressive white world ceased to exist and they reigned as African kings and queens. It is an oddly romantic vision of African life, this idea that something whole lurks under the surface of a half-made, borrowed civilization. Perhaps it is more telling of Naipaul’s own longings than of the reality of most people’s lives. If he is always clear-eyed about the pretentions of religious fanatics, Third World mimic men, and delusional political figures, his idea of wholeness can sound almost sentimental.
David Levine
V.S. Naipaul
I remember being in a car with Naipaul one summer day in Wiltshire, England, near the cottage where he lived. He told me about his driver, a local man. The driver, he said, had a special bond with the rolling hills we were passing through. The man was aware of his ancestors buried under our feet. He belonged here. He felt the link with generations that had been here before him: “That is how he thinks, that is how he thinks.”
I am not convinced at all that this was the way Naipaul’s driver thought. But it was certainly the way he thought in the writer’s imagination. Naipaul was our greatest poet of the half-baked and the displaced. It was the imaginary wholeness of civilizations that sometimes led him astray. He became too sympathetic to the Hindu nationalism that is now poisoning India politics, as if a whole Hindu civilization were on the rise after centuries of alien Muslim or Western despoliations.
There is no such thing as a whole civilization. But some of Naipaul’s greatest literature came out of his yearning for it. Although he may, at times, have associated this with England or India, his imaginary civilization was not tied to any nation. It was a literary idea, secular, enlightened, passed on through writing. That is where he made his home, and that is where, in his books, he will live on.
August 13, 2018, 1:39 pm
Image may contain: 1 person, closeup













RIP


https://www.theguardian.com/…/vs-naipaul-nobel-prize-winnin…

Trinidad-born author won both acclaim and disdain for his caustic portrayals, in novels and non-fiction, of the legacy of colonialism
Nhà văn Ấn Độ, sinh tại Trinidad, được khen, cũng dữ, và chửi, cũng chẳng thua, do cái sự miêu tả cay độc của ông ta, trong cả giả tưởng lẫn không giả tưởng, di sản của chủ nghĩa thực dân thuộc địa
Naipaul là 1 tác giả quá quen thuộc với độc giả Tin Văn. Ngay khi ông được Nobel, là GCC đã dịch và giới thiệu 1 truyện ngắn của ông trong Phố Miguel, và sau đó, dịch bài diễn văn Nobel. Mới đây nhất, là bài viết- mới đi được 1 mẩu - của James Wood, “Wounder and Wounded” [Kẻ làm kẻ khác bị thương, và bị thương]. Nay, bèn lôi ra, đốt trọn nén nhang vĩnh biệt ông.
“The politics of a country can only be an extension of its idea about human relationships”
Naipaul. Pankaj Mishra trích dẫn trong The Writer and the World. Introduction.
"The most splendid writer of English alive today ....
He looks into the mad eye of history and does not blink."
-THE BOSTON GLOBE
Note: Bài viết này,  được 1 bạn văn đăng lại, trên blog của anh, thành thử Gấu phải “bạch hóa” mấy cái tên viết tắt, cho dễ hiểu, và nhân tiện, đi thêm 1 đường về Naipaul.
Ông này cũng thuộc thứ cực độc, nhưng quả là 1 đại sư phụ. TV sẽ đi bài của Bolano viết về ông, đã giới thiệu trên TV, nhưng chưa có bản dịch. 
Bài viết này, theo GCC, đến lượt nó, qua khứu giác của Bolano, làm bật ra con thú ăn thịt người nằm sâu trong 1 tên…. Bắc Kít!
Tớ sinh ra ở đó, nhưng đúng là 1 lỗi lầm. Naipaul nói về nơi ông sinh ra, Trinidad, và ông sẽ tự tử, nếu không bỏ đi được. Một người bạn của ông đã làm như vậy.
WOUNDER AND WOUNDED
The public snob, the grand bastard, was much in evidence when I interviews V. S. Naipaul in 1994, and this was exactly as expected. A pale woman, his secretary, showed me in to the sitting room of his London flat. Naipaul looked warily at me, offered a hand, and began an hour of scornful correction. I knew nothing, he said, about his birthplace, Trinidad; I possessed the usual liberal sentimentality. It was a slave society, a plantation. Did I know anything about his writing? He doubted it. The writing life had been desperately hard. But hadn't his great novel, A House for Mr. Biswas, been acclaimed on its publication, in 1961? "Look at the lists they made at the end of the 1960s of the best books of the decade. Biswas is not there. Not there." His secretary brought coffee and retired. Naipaul claimed that he had not even been published in America until the 1970s “and then the reviews were awful-unlettered, illiterate, ignorant.” The phone rang, and kept ringing. "I am sorry," Naipaul said in exasperation, "one is not well served here." Only as the pale secretary showed me out, and novelist and servant briefly spoke to each other in the hall, did I realize that she was Naipaul's wife.
    A few days later, the phone rang. "It's Vidia Naipaul. I have just read your ... careful piece in The Guardian. Perhaps we can have lunch. Do you know the Bombay Brasserie? What about one o'clock tomorrow?| The Naipaul who took me to lunch that day was different
[còn tiếp]
James Wood: The Fun Stuff

Typical sentence
Easier to pick two of them. What’s most typical is the way one sentence qualifies another. “The country was a tyranny. But in those days not many people minded.” (“A Way in the World”, 1994.)
Câu văn điển hình:

Dễ kiếm hai câu, điển hình nhất, là cái cách mà câu này nêu phẩm chất câu kia:
"Xứ sở thì là bạo chúa. Nhưng những ngày này, ít ai "ke" chuyện này!"
Naipaul rất tởm cái gọi là quê hương là chùm kế ngọt của ông. Khi được hỏi, giá như mà ông không chạy trốn được quê hương [Trinidad] của mình, thì sao, ông phán, chắc nịch, thì tao tự tử chứ sao nữa! (1)
Tuyệt.
(1)
INTERVIEWER
Do you ever wonder what would have become of you if you had stayed in Trinidad?
NAIPAUL
I would have killed myself. A friend of mine did-out of stress, I think. He was a boy of mixed race. A lovely boy, and very bright. It was a great waste.
“Con người và nhà văn là một. Đây là phát giác lớn lao nhất của nhà văn. Phải mất thời gian – và biết bao là chữ viết! – mới nhập một được như vậy.”
 (Man and writer were the same person. But that is a writer’s greatest discovery. It took time – and how much writing! – to arrive at that synthesis)
 V.S. Naipaul, “The Enigma of Arrival”
Trong bài tiểu luận “Lời mở đầu cho một Tự thuật” (“Prologue to an Autobiography”), V.S. Naipaul kể về những di dân Ấn độ ở Trinidad. Do muốn thoát ra khỏi vùng Bắc Ấn nghèo xơ nghèo xác của thế kỷ 19, họ “đăng ký” làm công nhân xuất khẩu, tới một thuộc địa khác của Anh quốc là Trinidad. Rất nhiều người bị quyến rũ bởi những lời hứa hẹn, về một miếng đất cắm dùi sau khi hết hợp đồng, hay một chuyến trở về quê hương miễn phí, để xum họp với gia đình. Nhưng đã ra đi thì khó mà trở lại. Và Trinidad tràn ngập những di dân Ấn, không nhà cửa, không mảy may hy vọng trở về.
Vào năm 1931, con tầu SS Ganges đã đưa một ngàn di dân về Ấn. Năm sau, trở lại Trinidad, nó chỉ kiếm được một ngàn, trong số hàng ngàn con người không nhà nói trên. Ngỡ ngàng hơn, khi con tầu tới cảng Calcutta, bến tầu tràn ngập những con người qui cố hương chuyến đầu: họ muốn trở lại Trinidad, bởi vì bất cứ thứ gì họ nhìn thấy ở quê nhà, dù một tí một tẹo, đều chứng tỏ một điều: đây không phải thực mà là mộng.
Ác mộng. 
“Em ra đi nơi này vẫn thế”. Ngày nay, du khách ghé thăm Bắc Ấn, nơi những di dân đợt đầu tiên tới Trinidad để lại sau họ, nó chẳng khác gì ngày xa xưa, nghĩa là vẫn nghèo nàn xơ xác, vẫn những con đường đầy bụi, những túp lều tranh vách đất, lụp xụp, những đứa trẻ rách rưới, ngoài cánh đồng cũng vẫn cảnh người cày thay trâu… Từ vùng đất đó, ông nội của Naipaul đã được mang tới Trinidad, khi còn là một đứa bé, vào năm 1880. Tại đây, những di dân người Ấn túm tụm với nhau, tạo thành một cộng đồng khốn khó. Vào năm 1906, Seepersad, cha của Naipaul, và bà mẹ, sau khi đã hoàn tất thủ tục hồi hương, đúng lúc tính bước chân xuống tầu, cậu bé Seepersad bỗng hoảng sợ mất vía, trốn vào một xó cầu tiêu công cộng, len lén nhìn ra biển, cho tới khi bà mẹ thay đổi quyết định.
Chính là nỗi đau nhức trí thức thuộc địa, chính nỗi chết không rời đó, tẩm thấm mãi vào mình, khiến cho Naipaul có được sự can đảm để làm một điều thật là giản dị: “Tôi gọi tên em cho đỡ nhớ”.
Em ở đây, là đường phố Port of Spain, thủ phủ Trinidad. Khó khăn, ngại ngùng, và bực bội – dám nhắc đến tên em – mãi sau này, sau sáu năm chẳng có chút kết quả ở Anh Quốc, vẫn đọng ở nơi ông, ngay cả khi Naipaul bắt đầu tìm cách cho mình thoát ra khỏi truyền thống chính quốc Âu Châu, và tìm được can đảm để viết về Port of Spain như ông biết về nó. Phố Miguel (1959), cuốn sách đầu tiên của ông được xuất bản, là từ quãng đời trẻ con của ông ở Port of Spain, nhưng ở trong đó, ông đơn giản và bỏ qua rất nhiều kinh nghiệm. Hồi ức của những nhân vật tới “từ một thời nhức nhối. Nhưng không phải như là tôi đã nhớ. Những hoàn cảnh của gia đình tôi quá hỗn độn; tôi tự nhủ, tốt hơn hết, đừng ngoáy sâu vào đó."







RIP

*


*

GNV & Phạm Văn Bình, cựu Đại Úy TQLC, tác giả bài hát Chuyện Tình Buồn

*

PVB & DTL & NDT
@ Tài Bửu Café

*

Thuan Nguyen to Quoc Tru Nguyen
2 hrs

Hello.anh Tru.

nha tho PHAM VAN BINH mat 5:00PM tai Nam Calif. ngay 22/7/2018.sinh quan Dong Ha, Quang Tri. Que noi: Truoi, Thua Thien. Trung uy TLC su doan TQLC.

TKS


*

PVB & DTL & NDT
@ Tài Bửu Café

A HISTORY OF SOLITUDE

Birdsong diminishes.
The moon sits for a photo.
The wet cheeks of streets gleam.
Wind brings the scent of ripe fields.
High overhead, a small plane cavorts like a dolphin.
Adam Zagajewski 
Chuyện Tình Buồn
 Tiếng chim loãng dần.
Mặt trăng ngồi vào một bức hình
Má phố ướt, ánh lên ánh trăng.
Gió mang mùi lúa đang độ chín
Mãi tít phía bên trên, một cái máy bay
quẵng 1 đường,

như chú cá heo.
Cái tít Chuyện Tình Buồn này, thay vì Một chuyện về nỗi cô đơn, là do Gấu nhớ đến cô bạn, và những ngày Ðỗ Hòa.
Lần đầu tiên Gấu nghe Chuyện Tình Buồn, là ở Ðỗ Hòa, 1 buổi tối văn nghệ tổ, trong 1 lán nào đó, khi là Y Tế Ðội, và khi 1 anh tù hát lên bản này, một anh khác cầm hai cái muỗng đánh nhịp, Gấu bèn nhớ ra liền buổi tối mò đến thăm em, đứng tít mãi bên ngoài, trong bóng tối nhìn vô căn nhà cũ, em thì đã lấy chồng, có đến mấy nhóc:
Anh một đời rong ruổi
Em tay bế tay bồng
Bèn lủi thủi ra về. Trưa hôm sau, bị tó ở bên Thủ Thiêm, đưa vô trường Phục Hồi Nhân Phẩm, Bình Triệu, vừa hết cữ vã, là xin đi lao động Ðỗ Hòa liền, hy vọng trốn Trại, kịp chuyến vượt biên đường Kampuchia.
PVB còn 1 bài thơ viết về Thủy Quân Lục Chiến, cũng được Phạm Duy phổ nhạc, trước bài CTB, để tặng Lê Nguyên Khang, chỉ huy trưởng lực lượng này.
Gấu ghé Tài Bửu là do có hẹn uống cà phe với chàng du tử, nhờ vậy gặp PVB. Ông bạn họa sĩ giới thiệu, và cho biết, ông mới bị cái bịnh đầu quẹo qua một bên, có thể là do kéo đàn vĩ cầm dạo Tiểu Sài Gòn lâu quá.
PVB hỏi Gấu có tiền không, cho 10 đồng. 
Gấu thật là cảm động, vì suốt 1 đời lụy Cô Ba, Gấu chưa từng ngửa tay xin tiền ai, trừ 1 lần, bạn tự động móc túi, là bạn C, em ông anh nhà thơ, tình cờ gặp khi vừa ra khỏi 1 con hẻm [hình như hẻm 76, ở Thị Nghè, phía bên kia cầu nếu đi từ Sài Gòn qua Gia Ðịnh]. Bạn cho biết vừa trải qua 1 cuộc giải phẫu, người còn xanh lét.
Bạn vừa bye bye, dọt ga, là Gấu cũng trở lại con xóm, làm thêm 1 cú, cho thoả thuê, bõ những ngày đói dài người, ngáp vỡ cổ họng, nước mắt nước mũi ràn rụa vì thèm, thiếu thuốc.
Còn 1 kỷ niệm, là cái áo sơ mi cộc tay sờn cũ, của ông bạn quí, và cuốn tiểu thuyết lừng danh Những Linh Hồn Chết, của Gogol. Cú này viết rồi, viết nữa, sợ bạn quí quê, vì lại lòi ra cái cú Gấu biếu bạn mấy ngàn đóng tiền cọc mua căn nhà ở làng báo chí Thủ Ðức.
Cái áo, cuốn tiểu thuyết thì bạn nhớ, nhưng lại quên vụ tiền bạc bửn thỉu chẳng đáng nhớ.
Cái vụ 10 đô này lại làm Gấu nhớ tới vụ ông bạn quí của Gấu, lặn lội từ Mẽo qua trại tị nạn Thái Lan, yêu cầu trưởng Trại Cấm Panat Nikhom cho gặp Gấu, chỉ để biếu 10 đô: Gấu cũng lặn lội từ Canada, đi hai chuyến bay, đến Tiểu Sài Gòn, gặp tác giả Chuyện Tình Buồn, để cám ơn ông, về lần nghe đầu tiên bài hát của ông, tại nông trường cải tạo Ðỗ Hòa, Cần Giờ, và bèn lập tức nhớ cô bạn, nhớ những ngày Mậu Thân, nỗi nhớ bám diết vào da thịt.
Khủng khiếp nhất, kinh nghiệm lập lại, lần nghe Yanni đầu tiên ngay những ngày đầu tiên chân ướt chân tuyết ở Xứ Lạnh Canada, bài After The Sunrise, đĩa CD đầu tiên, phải đến khi đọc câu của Simone Weil (1) thì mới ngộ ra được, mi sẽ còn sống cuộc chiến đó nhiều lần, rất nhiều lần... và mi còn nợ cô bạn nữ thi sĩ VC, một câu trả lời, khi em hỏi, lần về lại Hà Nội.
"Anh vẫn còn nghe Yanni…?"
(1)
“Xa xôi, cách trở là linh hồn của cái đẹp” [‘Distance is the soul of beauty’]. Simone Weil.
Milosz mê câu này quá, chôm, đưa vô trong diễn văn Nobel văn chương, và thú nhận trước bàn thờ, tôi mắc nợ bà thật là nhiều...

Khoảng cách là linh hồn của cái đẹp.
Gấu cũng mê quá, và bèn áp dụng cho/vào khoảng cách của hai lần nghe 1 bản nhạc sến, trước 195, còn Miền Nam, còn Ngụy, và sau 1975, khi nghe cũng bản nhạc, ở trong tù VC

“Xa xôi, cách trở là linh hồn của cái đẹp” [‘Distance is the soul of beauty’]. Simone Weil.

I translated the selected works of Simone Weil into Polish 1958 not because I pretended to be a "Weilian." I wrote frankly in the preface that I consider myself a Caliban, too fleshy, heavy, to take on the feathers of an Ariel. Simone Weil was an Ariel. My aim was utilitarian, in accordance, I am sure, with I wishes as to the disposition of her works. A few years ago I spent many afternoons in her family's apartment overlooking the Luxembourg Gardens-at her table covered with ink stains from I pen-talking to her mother, a wonderful woman in her eighties. Albert Camus took refuge in that apartment the day he received the Nobel Prize and was hunted by photographers and journalists. My aim, as I say, was utilitarian. I resented the division Poland into two camps: the clerical and the anticlerical, nationalistic Catholic and Marxist- I exclude of course the apparatchiki, bureaucrats just catching every wind from Moscow. I suspect un-orthodox Marxists (I use that word for lack of a better one) and non-nationalistic Catholics have very much in common, at least common interests. Simone Weil attacked the type of religion that is only a social or national conformism. She also attacked shallowness of the so-called progressives. Perhaps my intention when preparing a Polish selection of her works, was malicious. But if a theological fight is going on- as it is in Poland, especially in high schools and universities-then every weapon is good to make adversaries goggle-eyed and to show that the choice between Christianity as represented by a national religion and the official Marxist ideology is not the only choice left to us today.
    In the present world torn asunder by a much more serious religious crisis than appearances would permit us to guess, Catholic writers are often rejected by people who are aware of their own misery as seekers and who have a reflex of defense when they meet proud possessors of the truth. The works of Simone Weil are read by Catholics and Protestants, atheists and agnostics. She has instilled a new leaven into the life of believers and unbelievers by proving that one should not be deluded by existing divergences of opinion and that many a Christian is a pagan, many a pagan a Christian in his heart. Perhaps she lived exactly for that. Her intelligence, the precision of her style were nothing but a very high degree of attention given to the sufferings of mankind. And, as she says, "Absolutely unmixed attention is prayer."
CZLESLAW MILOSZ: THE IMPORTANCE OF SIMONE WEIL

Tôi dịch 1 tuyển tập Simone Weil qua tiếng Ba Lan, vào năm 1958, không phải là để coi mình là 1 “Weilian”. Tôi viết rõ ra như thế ở trong bài tựa, rằng tôi tự coi mình là 1 Caliban, bằng xương bằng thịt, nặng 1 cục – cái túi thịt thối tha bằng da, như bên Phật nói – làm sao tôi nhẹ như lông hồng, như 1 Ariel? Simone Weil là 1 Ariel. Mục đích ở trên đời của tôi - thì như Thánh Cao phán, trời sinh ta, không phải để ta hư đi, hay nói rõ hơn, tôi muốn là 1 con người hữu dụng, my aim was utilitarian (cú nhắm của tôi có tính vị lợi), và nếu như thế, tôi nghĩ và làm, theo ước muốn của Bà, được đặt tôi, dưới sự sử dụng của Bà.
Cách đây vài năm tôi trải qua rất nhiều những buổi xế trưa, trong 1 căn phòng của gia đình Ba, nhìn ra vườn Lục Xâm Bảo – ngồi ở cái bàn với những vết mực từ ngòi viết của Bà, nói chuyện với bà cụ thân mẫu của Bà, một người đàn bà tuyệt vời ở tuổi tám mươi. Albert Camus cũng dùng căn phòng này, để lẩn trốn đám ký giả, phóng viên khi ông được Nobel văn chương. Mục đích của tôi, như tôi đã nói, là làm 1 kẻ vị lợi – theo cái nghĩa có ích, có lợi cho đời. Tôi rất đau, rất cáu, về cái chuyện Ba Lam bị chia ra là hai phe: tăng lữ và chống tăng lữ, Ca-tô quốc gia (national Catholic) và Mác Xít – tôi gạt ra ngoài - lẽ dĩ nhiên – đám thư lại “apparatchiki” đón gió Moscow.Tôi nghi ngờ đám Mác xít không chính thống – tôi dùng từ này, vì không kiếm ra từ khá hơn, và đám Ca-tô-líc không quốc gia, có rất nhiều cái chung chạ, ít nhất, những lợi lộc. Simone Weil đả phá thứ tôn giáo chỉ như là 1 thứ đồng thuận xã hội hay quốc gia. Bà cũng đả phá tính nông cạn của đám tự coi chúng là tầng lớp tiến bộ.
Có lẽ, ý định của tôi, khi tuyển chọn dịch những bái viết của Bà, để dịch qua tiếng Ba Lan, thì có mùi láu cá – malicious: ác ý, hiểm độc… Nhưng nếu một cuộc đánh đấm thần học vẫn tiếp tục, và như ở Ba Lan, đặc biệt, ở trung học và đại học, thì mọi khí giới thì đều tốt cả, để khiến những địch thủ bị lồi con mắt (goggle-eyed) và chỉ ra điều này, sự chọn lựa giữa Ky Tô Giáo như được đại diện bởi tôn giáo quốc gia, và ý thức hệ Mác Xít nhà nước thì không phải là chọn lựa độc nhất để lại cho chúng ta vào những ngày này.
Czeslaw Milosz: Sự quan trọng của Simone Weil











http://tanvien.net/Tuong_niem/do_long_van.html




RIP
Quoc Tru Nguyen shared a memory.
Anonymous
May 23, 2017, 4:08:00 AM
Anonymous
May 23, 2017, 4:08:00 AM
Không biết độ này bác Tin Văn có khoẻ không nhỉ, không thấy trang nhà có bài mới.
Reply
Replies

Anonymous
May 23, 2017, 2:36:00 PM
bác Tin Văn còn đang bựn facebook, khổ thế chứ lị
Anonymous
May 24, 2017, 12:22:00 AM
Ông ấy vẫn còn
Blog NL
TKS
nqt
The New York Review of Books13 hrs
A life in literary criticism: how Review writers read and responded to the novels of Philip Roth (1933–2018)








*

'It no longer feels a great injustice that I have to die'.
"Chết là cùng, chứ gì!"
"Tớ đếch cười".
Philip Roth: 'I don't smile'. Photo: AP
In a rare interview, Philip Roth, one of America's greatest living authors, tells Danish journalist Martin Krasnik why his new book is all about death - and why literary critics should be shot.
Wednesday December 14, 2005
The Guardian
Trong một phỏng vấn hiếm, Philip Roth nói với nhà báo Đan Mạch, Martin Krasnik, tại sao cuốn sách mới của ông chỉ nói về cái chết, và tại sao nên đem bắn bỏ mấy thằng phê bình văn học.
Philip Roth ít khi cho đời phỏng vấn, và tôi nhận ra lý do liền lập tức. Không phải ông khó chịu, khó chơi, khệnh khạng: Ông chịu không nổi mấy thằng ngu cứ hỏi đi hỏi lại, cũng chừng ấy câu.

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/may/24/philip-roth-explorer-golden-age-dark-corners-jonathan-freedland-appreciation




Philip Roth: explorer of a golden age's dark corners

Kẻ thám hiểm những góc tối của một hoàng kim thời đại



Roth’s work evokes the sense of endless opportunity postwar America seemed to promise

Tôi không muốn là tên nô lệ của những đòi hỏi của văn chương nữa.
Tại làm sao mà ông nói đã viết rất nhiều cuốn, trong số đó có Némésis và Cú độc chống Mẽo, Le Complot contre l'Amérique, chung quanh ý nghĩ sợ hãi?
Tại sao ông không đặt câu hỏi đó cho Kafka?




* *

*

Xuống phố quơ… vài tờ báo, trên đường đi gặp bác sĩ kiểm tra sức khoẻ Gấu Già. Tháng nào cũng phải đi, vì có những thứ thuốc bác sĩ gia đình phải nhìn thấy mặt, mới kê đơn, theo luật mới của Xứ Lạnh
Nhưng cái số Granta cũ - số 24, Summer 1988, bị cấm tại xứ Ăng Lê, thế mới thú - vớ được ở tiệm sách báo cũ,  trong có bài của Roth mới thực là tuyệt cú mèo!
“His Roth”. “Thằng Cu Roth của Bố Nó!

Với Roth, Gấu có hai kỷ niệm thật là tuyệt vời, vì đều có bóng dáng BHD ở trỏng.

Bạn nào đã đọc Goodbye, Columbus, Phan Lệ Thanh, bồ 1 thời của Nguyễn Đông Ngạc, đã từng dịch ra tiếng Mít -  chắc khó mà quên cái cảnh BHD tắm trong hồ, bơi vô bờ, nhìn anh cu Gấu đứng xớ rớ gần đó, "eh, thằng nhỏ kia, mang cặp kiếng mát kia kìa đến đây cho ta"!

Gấu đã từng chiêm ngưỡng không chỉ 1, mà tới hai lần hình ảnh thần tiên đó!
Tất nhiên, qua tưởng tượng, nhờ đọc Roth.
Hà, hà!

Về cái chuyện đếch thèm viết văn nữa, Roth phán, ta hết còn là 1 tên nô lệ của văn chương rồi.
Gấu cũng có cảm giác đó, khi BHD ra đi!
Hết còn là nô lệ mà sao nghe ra quá đắng cay, chẳng thấy tí hạnh phước nào!

*
Kafka & Roth
Nói đến hết còn là nô lệ, có ngay 1 bài thơ để ăn mừng, trên: Một cuộc phiêu lưu
Nó đến với Gấu vào ban đêm, khi đang ngủ, rằng mi hết còn những phiêu lưu tình ái vớ va vớ vẩn nữa,
Những cuộc phiêu lưu mà Gấu là 1 tên nô lệ.
Thế nà thế lào?
Phi ní tình yêu ư?
Trái tim Gấu lầu bầu…..


Hoàng Đế Cởi Truồng thắng Man Booker năm nay

Miền Nam Việt Nam đọc Roth rất sớm, qua cuốn Goodbye, Columbus, 1959 [Saul Bellow phán, cuốn thứ nhất nhưng không phải cuốn của 1 kẻ mới bắt đầu, "a first book but ... not the book of a beginner"], do Phan Lệ Thanh dịch.
Cuốn này thì thật tuyệt. Quá tuyệt.
GNV làm sao cứ nhớ hoài cái cảnh, em đang tắm trong 1 bể bơi, và ra lệnh cho GNV đứng kế đó, nè, thằng lùn lé đần kia, nhặt cho ta cái kính râm.
Cú sét đánh, mặc khải, tình yêu như trái phá, yêu từ cú nhìn đầu tiên, yêu không là nhìn nhau mà là nhìn về cùng 1 hướng, yêu là chết ở trong hồn 1 tí.... đối với tên nhóc. (1)
Vụ Roth vớ Man Booker, chứng minh “lý thuyết” của bà Huệ, lại mafia Do Thái ban giải thuởng cho 1 tên Do Thái! 
Cái bà nữ giám khảo, "quit job" khi Roth được giải, nhận xét về ông, mới cay độc làm sao, và, thật là đúng: Còn nhiều tác giả đáng được trao giải hơn, so với Roth. Theo Gấu, có thể Man Booker khi trao giải cho Roth, là để "giải lời nguyền" của vị thư ký Nobel, văn chương Mẽo không xứng đáng để được Nobel.
Trong cột báo của mình trên Guardian Review, Callil cho biết bà còn bực mình, vì giải thưởng thất bại trong cái việc vinh danh dịch dọt –danh sách chót gồm những tác giả TQ, TBN, Italy, Lebanese… - Tại sao không 1 trong họ, mà thay vì thế, thì là Roth, “lại một đấng Bắc… Mẽo”
(1) Chỉ mãi tới khi sắp xuống lỗ, thì GNV mới hiểu ra được, tại sao lại nhớ hoài xen này: Gấu đã mong được như vậy.
Bạn còn nhớ cái cảnh, G và anh bạn cùng tới nhà BHD, vào 1 buổi sáng, G nhờ anh bạn đưa giùm cái thư, vì bị cấm cửa. Anh bạn vô, đưa, BHD để cái thư lên bàn, và ra lệnh:
-Anh V. phụ em khiêng cái giuờng.
Khi đó, em mới dọn nhà từ Phan Đình Phùng lên Gia Long.
-Em mày láo quá, nó sai tao khiêng giường cho nó!
-Thế thì sao mày không để tao?
*
Lớp học trò chúng tôi, đa số biết Paris qua... Thanh Tịnh. Con đường tới Paris bắt đầu bằng cảnh: mẹ tôi âu yếm dẫn tay tôi trên con đường làng, tôi vẫn quen đi lại nhiều lần, nhưng lần này tôi thấy lạ. Con đường làng Việt Nam dẫn hai đứa chúng tôi tới những lối đi nơi vườn Lục Xâm Bảo, và bầu trời hàng năm cứ vào cuối thu, lá ngoài đường rụng nhiều, và trên không có những đám mây bàng bạc của Thanh Tịnh, bỗng lẫn vào bầu trời chập chùng Mùa Thu Paris, những chiếc lá vàng rơi trên những pho tượng trần, những bữa cơm tối ăn dưới ánh đèn... ôi chao, tôi lại thấy cảnh này, ở nơi vườn Bờ Rô Sài Gòn, những ngày quen cô bé... 
Cô bé, là, BHD
Coetzee điểm Cú Độc Nhắm Vào nước Mẽo, The Plot Against America, của Roth, so sánh Roth với Shakespeare.
Gừng càng già càng cay, Roth has grown in stature as a writer as he has grown older. Ở đỉnh cao của ông, at his best, thì ông vào lúc này đúng là 1 “bi đại tiểu thuyết gia thực sự” [a novelist of authentically tragic scope].
Ở vào cực đỉnh cực, tức phút cực khoái của ông, at his very best, ông có thể vươn tới đỉnh Shakespeare, he can reach Shakespearean height.
Còn bà nữ chủ khảo Man Booker thì chê thậm tệ ông vua cởi truồng:
Ông ta cứ ngày nọ qua tháng kia, lèm bèm hoài về chỉ 1 đề tài [BHD, hà hà], trong bất cứ 1 cuốn nào, mới ra lò, hay ra lò đời xửa đời xưa. Cứ như thể ông ta ngồi mẹ lên mặt bạn và làm bạn hết thở!
TV sẽ giới thiệu bài của Coetzee, thật là tuyệt, tất nhiên! C. gọi Roth là 1 văn hiện thực viết chuyện không thực!
Coetzee viết, một cuốn tiểu thuyết lịch sử, theo định nghĩa, được đặt để trong 1 quá khứ lịch sử [Nguyễn Huệ quả có ra Bắc, thí dụ, nhưng cái hành động nhét cứt, thì chắc là không… chắc lắm đâu, sĩ phu Bắc Kít đừng lo!]. Quá khứ “Cú độc chơi anh Mẽo” không thực. Nó giống 1984 của Orwell, và giông giống cõi của Borges, nếu nhìn từ xa.

Callil said that "he goes on and on and on about the same subject in almost every single book. It's as though he's sitting on your face and you can't breathe".
Callil giải thích, lý do bà không ủng hộ Roth là ông “viết đi viết lại về một chủ đề trong hết cuốn này đến cuốn khác. Thử tưởng tượng mà xem, nếu ông ta ngồi trước mặt bạn, chắc bạn sẽ không thở được”.
Ngồi trước mặt thì thở vưõn cứ được.
Nhưng ngồi lên mặt, thì thua!
Cái bà nữ chủ khảo, kiêm nghề điểm sách này, quả là cực độc! Đúng dân nhà nghề!
Ngồi lên mặt.
Ông vua cởi truồng.
Tuyệt!
Ẩn dụ này, còn nhắm ban chủ khảo Man Booker.
Roth cởi truồng mà mấy vị cứ làm như ông ta trong bộ áo Hoàng Đế! 







Tribute to Dinh Cuong


Lần gặp Đinh Cường lần đầu mà cũng là lần cuối, sau này, nghĩ lại, y chang những lần gặp định mệnh trong đời Gấu, theo nghĩa, phải có Lão Tặc Thiên dính vô, nếu không, không thể xẩy ra.
Thí dụ, lần suýt chết đuối khi còn nhỏ, Gấu đã kể đôi lần rồi (1): Thấy thiên hạ nhảy xuống ao bơi ào ào, thằng nhóc nghĩ trong đầu, ai cũng bơi được, why not, chứ sao, thế là bèn cũng phóng xuống, và chìm nghỉm, may nhờ 1 đấng đứng kế bên, thuộc dạng đàn anh, nhảy theo, xách lên.
Rõ ràng là anh ta đứng đó, để chờ làm cái bổn phận đó, tếu thế!
Cũng thế, là lần gặp ĐC.
Nếu không gặp ĐC, không có vụ nhường phòng cho đấng bạn quí của anh, qua tá túc bên nhà bạn Bạn, thì làm sao thoát chết vì cái vụ tự làm thịt mình, ở PLT?

ĐC không phải thứ đến nhà bạn, ngủ. Anh đi giang hồ, là ở khách sạn, không khi nào làm phiền bạn bè, dù thành phố buồn, hay không buồn, lạ hay không lạ, có bạn quí hay không có bạn quí. Do trước đó, lái xe, tí cán người,  hay tí xém chết, vì buồn ngủ, anh phải đến nhà NDT, để phòng hờ lỡ gặp chuyện không may, còn có người biết.

Thê lương nhất, hay, cảm động nhất, thằng cha già khú đế, là Lão Tặc Thiên, để mắt tới Gấu Cà Chớn, là lần ở Đỗ Hòa. Phải có thằng chả, Gấu về già, phán, như Einstein, phán, lần ông khám phá ra luật tương đối. Cái “great mistake” của Einstein, như ông nhìn nhận, là tin vào định mệnh thuyết, tức là tin có 1 ông Trời!

(1)

Viết là Khiếp
     Tôi trở nên khiếp đảm...
Đêm 23 tháng Chạp, năm 1985, cùng lúc với ông Táo chầu trời, trên một chiếc tầu vượt biển sắp sửa chìm gần ngọn hải đăng ở cửa biển Vũng Tầu, có một ông già bị cậu thanh niên đứng kế bên lầm là người yêu của anh. Quá khiếp đảm trước cái chết có thể xẩy tới bất cứ lúc nào, cậu thanh niên điên cuồng vò đầu, vò tai người yêu, tức ông già, lảm nhảm những lời hoảng loạn. Tuy đang bận tâm vì một chuyện khác, ông già vẫn nhận ra, nước biển mặn, lạnh buốt, còn nước mắt của cậu thanh niên, mặn, nóng hổi, rát hằn một bên má. Những cột nước như từ trên trời đổ mãi. Con thuyền chúi sâu xuống khoảng không đen, sâu thẳm, rồi bị đẩy bắn lên cao, chót ngọn sóng. Ông già đang nhớ lại những lần chết trước đó.
Bẩy, tám tuổi, thấy bạn cùng lớp nhào xuống ao, bơi lội ào ào, ông nghĩ, ai cũng làm được. Và cứ thế lao xuống. May có người đứng ngay kế bên, nhìn thấy thằng bé sắp sửa chìm nghỉm, bèn nhảy vội xuống, kéo lên.
Khi đã hoàn hồn, đứng ngơ ngác trên bờ, cậu bé như cảm thấy, cậu biết trước tai nạn. Như thể, cậu đã trải qua một lần rồi, và lần này, chỉ là lập lại lần trước. Nó đã từng xẩy ra, trong một giấc mơ, có thể.
Cậu có cảm tưởng, anh bạn lớn tuổi đã "chờ", một sự kiện như vậy, sẽ xẩy ra, và anh ta sẽ can thiệp, đúng lúc.
Rõ rệt nhất là lần chơi bắn bi một mình. Nhà có một chiếc hòm [cái rương] lớn, chiếm cả một góc gian nhà chính, trên là bàn thờ ông bà, trong đựng lúa, đặt trên hai tấm mễ gỗ, hay ngựa gỗ, thấp. Người dân miền Bắc, từ xa xưa vẫn bị ám ảnh bởi những cơn lũ lụt, và những năm hạn hán, lúc nào cũng lo mất mùa, nên nhà nào cũng lo trữ lúa.
Hòn bi lăn tít vào gầm hòm. Cậu bò vào. Loay hoay cọ quậy, cả hai tấm ngựa gỗ, quá mục, cùng sập xuống.
Như sống lại giấc mơ, cậu xoài người ra. Chiếc hòm đè cậu bẹp dí, may nhờ hai chiếc mễ chia giùm sức nặng. Lần đó, ba hồn bẩy vía đi luôn, mấy người lớn bắt ăn mấy vắt cơm để thu hồi lại.
Lớn lên, cậu mất dần khả năng kỳ cục, và mơ hồ cảm nhận - không tính lần suýt bị bẹp dí - có một điều gì liên can đến "nước", trong những lần như vậy.
Như thể gia đình ông bị trù yểm, bởi nước.
*
Ông già của ông già bị đảng phái thủ tiêu, bằng cách cột đá vào người bỏ xuống sông.
Đứa em trai, tử trận tại một khúc sông, do một viên đạn từ bên kia bờ bắn xuống nước dội lên.
Bản thân ông đã từng bị thương nặng tại bờ sông Sài-gòn.
Lần đó, đúng ra là đi luôn, nếu không có kẻ thế mạng: một chuyên viên Phi Luật Tân mới chân ướt chân ráo tới Sài-gòn.
*
Nhưng được bỏ qua, không có nghĩa là được tha thứ. Ông già thấy nhẫn nhục, cam chịu.
Đó là một chuyến đi được tổ chức rất chu đáo. Và có lúc ông già nghĩ rằng sẽ thành công...
*
"Tôi trở nên khiếp đảm bởi nghệ thuật".
D. M. Dylan Thomas mở đầu “Hồi tưởng & Hoang tưởng”.
Với ông, khả năng thấu thị, nhìn thấy cái chết, trước khi nó xẩy ra, ở một cậu bé, chính là "phép lạ" của nghệ thuật, (ở chúng ta). Và ông trở nên khiếp đảm, bởi nó. "Nghệ thuật là những ngã ba ngã tư tàn khốc, mang tính Oedipe. Nơi mộng mị, tình yêu, và cái chết gặp gỡ. Zhivago của Pasternak chiêm nghiệm một điều, rằng nghệ thuật luôn luôn là suy tư về cái chết, từ đó sáng tạo ra sự sống.
Điều ngược lại cũng hoàn toàn đúng. Cách đây vài năm, tôi [D.M. THomas] đi thăm Lydia, người chị/em gái, của Pasternak. Một căn nhà từ hồi Victoria, ọp ẹp, tối thui. Chủ nhà, một người bà già nhỏ nhắn, rệu rạo, lưng còng, mang đôi giầy cụt lủn, lủng lẳng bị chìa khoá... Bà dẫn vào nhà bếp, mời dùng cà phê. Một cái hũ cà phê, loại uống liền, hai cái ly trắng, mẻ. Câu chuyện nhạt thếch. Tôi không làm sao liên hệ bà với Boris, người sáng tạo ra Zhivago, và Lara. Sau cùng, bà hỏi tôi có muốn đi xem mấy bức họa của ông thân sinh. Một cách biết ơn, tôi nói vâng. Tôi đi theo đôi giầy cụt ngủn, bị chìa khoá lên lầu. Bà mở cửa căn phòng.
Một luồng mầu sắc và ánh sáng làm tôi chới với, nghẹt thở. Đúng là một phòng tranh tuyệt vời. Tôi nhận ra ngay Tolstoy, ở nơi Boris trẻ. Sàn ngổn ngang những khung, giá vẽ.
"Tôi đang sửa soạn một cuộc triển lãm", bà giải thích.
Như một bóng ma, tôi đi theo, suốt căn phòng rộng, uống từng hớp thiên tài Leonid Pasternak. Có đến vài phút đồng hồ, tôi đứng ngẩn trước một bức họa. Chân dung một người đàn bà đẹp, dáng mơ mộng, đang chải tóc.
Tôi yêu liền ngay nàng.
"Nàng là ai vậy ?"
Bà già còng nhún vai:
"Ôi dào, tôi đó mà".
Chẳng thèm để ý đến nỗi mất mát lớn lao, là tuổi trẻ, và nhan sắc, bà quay đi.
Chẳng có gì đáng kể, ngoại trừ thiên tài bất tử của người cha. Tôi có cảm giác những bức họa đã hút sạch bao nhiêu ánh sáng, bao nhiêu đời sống từ căn nhà của cô con gái.
"Tôi nghĩ chắc là bà đã có bảo hiểm những bức họa?" "Không, nếu bị đánh cắp, cái gì có thể thay thế?"
Trở lại bếp, bà cho tôi coi những bức hình gia đình, hầu hết là của Boris và con cháu của ông.
Một trong những đứa cháu trai, Lyovya, đã chết trong những tình huống thật là kỳ bí, đáng sợ; bà bảo tôi. Chưa tới 30, đang khoẻ mạnh, nó lăn quay ra chết, vì đứng tim, ngay trên đường phố Moscow, đúng chỗ Zhivago bị bịnh tim quật ngã..."
Thomas không thể không nghĩ đến một điều, cái chết của nhân vật giả tưởng, Zhivago, đã "ứng" vào người cháu trai.
Thiên tài Pasternak đã biến đứa cháu thành một cái bóng, y hệt như cô con gái Lydia đã trở thành cái bóng của nghệ thuật, của ông thân sinh.
Liền đó, ông kể lại một kinh nghiệm của riêng ông, trong một lần đi trị bịnh. Bà bác sĩ tâm thần làm ông nhớ đến mẹ, và một lần không vâng lời bà.
(Ở đây có một cái gì liên can đến mặc cảm Oedipe).
"Thay vì đi nhà thờ, cậu đã tới một sex shop".
"Đúng như vậy". "
Rồi trí tưởng của tôi đầy rẫy những hình ảnh chết chóc, của mẹ tôi, của bạn bè...
Bữa sau, bà bác sĩ gọi điện thoại:
"Tôi không thể gặp anh bữa nay. Tôi phải đi đám ma.
"Oh, I am sorry, tôi mong không phải là một người thân của bà.
"Thảm thay, đúng như vậy, ông già của tôi."
Và Thomas kết luận, đâu có gì là đáng ngạc nhiên, nếu tôi trở nên khiếp đảm vì nghệ thuật ? "Không phải cuốn sách của tôi là một tên sát nhân, nhưng đâu đó, từ những trang sách vang lên, tiếng cười sảng khoái, của quỷ...". 
Chỉ là lộng giả thành chân. Bóng ma giả tưởng Zhivago kiếm người thế mạng để đi đầu thai.
Đó cũng là cảm giác ghê rợn, khủng khiếp khi ông già gặp lại cô bạn ở xứ lạnh. Như thể cuộc chiến lập lại, khi giả tưởng "xuất hiện". 
Chuyến đi "liên can" tới lễ kỷ niệm 10 năm đại thắng Mùa Xuân, của những người CS. Người bạn đi cùng ông già mang theo những danh sách, những bản tin, những tài liệu về miền Nam sau mười năm, phóng sự về những sĩ quan đi học tập, tình cảnh vợ con ở nhà, và ... MIA.
Ông già quen anh bạn, những ngày cả hai cùng làm việc cho một hãng tin nước ngoài. Anh là nhiếp ảnh viên. Gốc "chệt", người nhỏ thó, tóc xoắn tít, có lần, trong lúc hơi ngà ngà, anh tỏ ra tự hào về mấy quí tướng của mình.
Ng. quả thực rất khôn ngoan. Nếu có gì đó, làm anh thất vọng về chính mình, có lẽ là, anh đã không theo đuổi nghề "phóng viên chiến tranh" cho tới cùng. Anh giải thích, làm cho hãng tin Mỹ một thời gian, anh chuyển qua một hãng tin Nhật. Ông già không gặp anh từ dạo đó. Rồi bỏ nghề, về nhà đuổi gà cho vợ.
"Mày có nhớ được bao nhiêu thằng tụi mình quen, đã tử mạng ? Ở chiến trường, cái máy chụp hình trông xa giống như khẩu súng. Còn chữ Press ở trên ngực, gặp VC tụi nó cũng chẳng tha. Sau Mậu Thân, bà vợ tao hoảng quá, không cho tao làm phó nháy nữa".
Cũng có thể còn một lý do. Tuy nhỏ con, nhưng anh có một sức hấp dẫn đặc biệt, với phụ nữ.
Anh vẫn mơ tưởng, ngoài người vợ anh đã ly dị, có với nhau một đứa con trai; ngoài bà vợ sau anh đang chung sống, có được một đứa bé gái - vì mê bả, anh giải thích, anh đã không bỏ đi, những ngày tháng Tư năm đó - còn một việc gì, chiến cuộc dành riêng cho anh, những kẻ bỏ cuộc hơi sớm. Như thể nó cho anh "hoãn dịch", để thực hiện sứ mạng này.
"Tôi để dành tôi cho tương lai", Phan Văn Hùm, (hay Tạ Thu Thâu ?), đã nói vậy, khi từ chối làm việc với những người CS. Một người quen của ông già cũng đã nói một câu tương tự, khi từ chối lệnh nhập ngũ.
Anh bạn phóng viên mơ tưởng "làm một việc, để trả ơn nhân dân Mỹ," khi đem đến cho họ tin tức, về những "con mực", mật ngữ của anh. Anh giấu kín những "tài liệu vô giá" đó, chỉ thêm vào, một bức thư, bằng tiếng Anh, do ông già viết. Một thứ "bạch thư", đại khái vậy. Thì cũng nhờ mớ tiếng Anh còn sót lại, ông già đã được "tổ chức", qua anh bạn phóng viên, chấp nhận.
Sau này, bữa theo vị linh mục người Pháp, tới văn phòng ODP, tại Bangkok, nằm trong building khổng lồ City Bank, ông thấy lại tất cả những đơn từ, thư viết tay, hình ảnh, hôn thú, giấy khai sinh..., tất cả những gì ông gửi từ Việt Nam, những ngày cực khổ, việc gửi thư là một xa xỉ... Không thấy bức "bạch thư". Như vậy, ông già nghĩ thầm, nó thuộc về một hồ sơ khác, nằm ở Bộ Quốc Phòng, như Steel, nhân viên tại Toà Lãnh Sự Mỹ, tại Vientiane, nói. "Steel, như cái này này," anh giơ chân đập vào tủ sắt kế bên. Trong bữa gặp gỡ, anh có nhắc tới Alan Dawson, một ký giả Mỹ làm cho UPI. "Ông ta là bạn tôi, hiện đang làm việc tại Bangkok. Các anh có thể tới đó gặp ông ta. Nhưng tôi không thể giúp đỡ gì, trong việc này. Tôi sẽ chuyển bức thư đi, vậy thôi." Trước khi nói chuyện anh đã cẩn thận đóng cửa văn phòng, không cho nhân viên người Lào tại sứ quán biết, về cuộc gặp mặt giữa những điệp viên CIA, hoặc MIA, "dởm". Sau khi đọc qua hồ sơ ODP, nhìn hình hai người lớn, và mấy đứa nhỏ, vị linh mục người Pháp nói, "Bây giờ ta có thể giúp con được rồi. Ta sẽ đưa con tới sở cảnh sát Bangkok. Họ sẽ bỏ tù vợ chồng con mấy tháng. Sau đó, Cao Uỷ sẽ đưa các con tới trại tị nạn."
Cũng lại một chuyến vượt biên, nhưng bằng đường bộ. Ông già vốn không tin con đường Đức Thánh Trần chỉ bảo. Gia đình ông, bị thần nước trù yểm, kể từ thời Sơn Tinh, Thuỷ Tinh, cũng nên. Quê ông vốn vùng núi Tản, sông Hồng.
Trên ghe, đa số là người theo đạo. Khi đã tuyệt vọng, họ hy vọng vào Chúa. Tiếng cầu kinh nổi lên, lúc đầu còn rời rạc, nhưng dần dần át tiếng mưa bão. Phép lạ, phép lạ, ông già loáng thoáng nghe có người suýt soa. Vài phút trước đó, ông đã được anh thợ máy, sau khi thất bại không thể làm cho máy chạy, từ dưới hầm tầu bò lên, nhìn trời, ngó đồng hồ... Sau đó, anh giải thích, bão ven biển vốn vậy. Tới gần sáng là ngưng. Vả lại ghe chưa ra xa bờ. Nếu sửa cho máy nổ, chắc là tiêu rồi, anh vừa nhìn vào bờ vừa thẫn thờ nói. Trên bờ loáng thoáng những ruộng muối...
Anh bạn đi cùng đã thả xuống biển những chứng tích cuối cùng, của chuyến đi...
NQT

Note: D.M Thomas là cái tay viết cuốn tiểu sử Solz.
Cái chuyện Gấu có cuốn sách cũng quá ly kỳ. Mua xon, trong khi chưa từng thấy trong tiệm. Như thể nó có đó, để chờ Gấu!
Rất mê Anna Akhmatova.
Dịch giả tập thơ You Will Hear Thunder


No automatic alt text available.





You Will Hear Thunder by Anna Akhmatova
You will hear thunder and remember me,
And think: she wanted storms. The rim
Of the sky will be the colour of hard crimson,
And your heart, as it was then, will be on fire.

That day in Moscow, it will all come true,
when, for the last time, I take my leave,
And hasten to the heights that I have longed for,
Leaving my shadow still to be with you.

Mi sẽ nghe tiếng sấm và sẽ nhớ ta
Và mi sẽ nghĩ: Ta muốn dông bão.
Viền trời sẽ có màu đỏ thật đậm
Và trái tim của mi, như nó đã từng, vào lúc đó, sẽ cháy bừng bừng

Ngày đó, ở Mát Cơ Va, tất cả sẽ trở thành hiện thực,
Khi, lần cuối cùng, ta bèn bỏ mi
Tới ngọn đỉnh trời mà ta vẫn hằng mong đợi
Để lại cho mi cái bóng của ta
Và nó sẽ ở với mi, suốt quãng đời thừa thãi còn lại của mi
Như là quà tặng của ta.



















Comments

Popular posts from this blog

TDT

Bi Khúc

Hoàng Hạc Lâu