From Russia With Love



NY: Home
Nghĩa địa Do Thái ở Leningrad
Ist Meeting
Buber
Brodsky by Tolstaya
Two Jews
Self Projected
Tiếng Nga dịch được không?
Reading in Iowa


From Russia With Love



*

On Joseph Brodsky
 
WHEN THE LAST things are taken out of a house, a strange, resonant echo settles in, your voice bounces off the walls and returns to you. There's the din of loneliness, a draft of emptiness, a loss of orientation, and a nauseating sense of freedom: everything's allowed and nothing matters, there's no response other than the weakly rhymed tap of your own footsteps. This is how Russian literature feels now: just four years short of millennium's end, it has lost the greatest poet of the second half of the twentieth century and can expect no other. Joseph Brodsky has left us, and our house is empty. He left Russia itself over two decades ago, became an American citizen, loved America, wrote essays and poems in English. But Russia is a tenacious country: try as you may to break free, she will hold you to the last.
    In Russia, when a person dies, the custom is to drape the mirrors in the house with black muslin - an old custom whose meaning has been forgotten or distorted. As a child I heard that this was done so that the deceased, who is said to wander his house for nine days saying his farewells to friends and family, won't be frightened when he can't find his reflection in the mirror. During his unjustly short but endlessly rich life, Joseph was reflected in so many people, destinies, books, and cities that during these sad days when he walks unseen among us, one wants to drape mourning veils over all the mirrors he loved: the great rivers washing the shores of Manhattan, the Bosphorus, the canals of Amsterdam, the waters of Venice, which he sang, the arterial net of Petersburg (a hundred islands-how many rivers?), the city of his birth, beloved and cruel, the prototype of all future cities.
    There, still a boy, he was judged for being a poet and by definition a loafer. It seems that he was the only writer in Russia to whom they applied that recently invented, barbaric law - which punished for the lack of desire to make money. Of course, that was not the point-with their animal instinct they already sensed full well just who stood before them. They dismissed all the documents recording the kopecks Joseph received for translating poetry.
"Who appointed you a poet?" they screamed at him.
"I thought ... 1 thought it was God."
All right then. Prison, exile.
Neither country nor churchyard will I choose
I'll return to Vasilevsky Island to die,
he promised in a youthful poem.
In the dark I won't find your deep blue facade
I'll fall on the asphalt between the crossed lines.
    I think that the reason he didn't want to return to Russia even for a day was so that this incautious prophecy would not come to be. A student of-among others-Akhmatova and Tsvetaeva, he knew their poetic superstitiousness, knew the conversation they had during their one and only meeting. "How could you write that? Don't you know that a poet's words always come true?" one of them reproached. ''And how could you write that?" the other was amazed. And what they foretold did indeed come to pass.
    I met him in 1988 during a short trip to the United States, and when 1 got back to Moscow 1 was immediately invited to an evening devoted to Brodsky. An old friend read his poetry, then there was a performance of some music that was dedicated to him. It was almost impossible to get close to the concert hall, passersby were grabbed and begged to sell "just one extra ticket." The hall was guarded by mounted police-you might have thought that a rock concert was in the offing. To my utter horror, I suddenly realized that they were counting on me: I was the first person they knew who had seen the poet after so many years of exile. What could I say? What can you say about a man with whom you've spent a mere two hours? I resisted, but they pushed me onto the stage. I felt like a complete idiot. Yes, I had seen Brodsky. Yes, alive. He's sick. He smokes. We drank coffee. There was no sugar in the house. (The audience grew agitated: are the Americans neglecting our poet? Why didn't he have any sugar?) Well, what else? Well, Baryshnikov dropped by, brought some firewood, they lit a fire. (More agitation in the hall: is our poet freezing to death over there?) What floor does he live on? What does he eat? What is he writing? Does he write by hand or use a typewriter? What books does he have? Does he know that we love him? Will he come? Will he come? Will he come?
"Joseph, will you come to Russia?"
"Probably. I don't know. Maybe. Not this year. I should go. I won't go. No one needs me there."
"Don't be coy! They won't leave you alone. They'll carry you through the streets - airplane and all. There'll be such a crowd they'll break through customs at Sheremetevo airport and carry you to Moscow in their arms. Or to Petersburg. On a white horse, if you like."
"That's precisely why I don't want to. And I don't need anyone there."
"It's not true! What about all those little old ladies of the intelligentsia, your readers, all the librarians, museum staff, pensioners, communal apartment dwellers who are afraid to go out into the communal kitchen with their chipped teakettle? The ones who stand in the back rows at philharmonic concerts, next to the columns, where the tickets are cheaper? Don't you want to let them get a look at you from afar, your real readers? Why are you punishing them?" It was an unfair blow. Tactless and unfair. He either joked his way out of it- "I'd rather go see my favorite Dutch," "I love Italians, I'll go to Italy," "The Poles are wonderful. They've invited me"-or would grow angry: "They wouldn't let me go to my father's funeral! My mother died without me-I asked- and they refused!"
    Did he want to go home? I think that at the beginning, at least, he wanted to very much, but he couldn't. He was afraid of the past, of memories, reminders, unearthed graves, was afraid of his weakness, afraid of destroying what he had done with his past in his poetry, afraid of looking back at the past-like Orpheus looked back at Eurydice-and losing it forever. He couldn't fail to understand that his true reader was there, he knew that he was a Russian poet, although he convinced himself -and himself alone-that he was an English-language poet. He has a poem about a hawk ("A Hawk's Cry in Autumn") in the hills of Massachusetts who flies so high that the rush of rising air won't let him descend back to earth, and the hawk perishes there, at those heights, where there are neither birds nor people nor any air to breathe.
    So could he have returned? Why did I and others bother him with all these questions about returning? We wanted him to feel, to know how much he was loved-we ourselves loved him so much! And I still don't know whether he wanted all this convincing or whether it troubled his troubled heart. "Joseph, you are invited to speak at the college. February or September?" "February, of course. September-I should live so long." And tearing yet another filter off yet another cigarette, he'd tell an-other grisly joke. "The husband says to his wife: 'The doctor told me that this is the end. I won't live till morning. Let's drink champagne and make love one last time.' His wife replies: 'That's all very well and fine for you-you don't have to get up in the morning!'
    " Did we have to treat him like a "sick person" - talk about the weather and walk on tiptoe? When he came to speak a Skidmore, he arrived exhausted from the three-hour drive, white as sheet-in a kind of condition that makes you want to call 9II. But he drank a glass of wine, smoked half a pack of cigarettes, made brilliant conversation, read his poems, and then more poems, poems, poems-smoked and recited by heart both his own and others' poems, smoked some more, and read some more. By that time, his audience had grown pale from his un-American smoke, and he was in top form-his cheeks grew rosy, his eyes sparkled, and he read on and on. And when by all reckoning he should have gone to bed with a nitroglycerin tablet under his tongue, he wanted to talk and went off to the hospitable hosts, the publishers of Salmagundi, Bob and Peggy Boyers. And he talked and drank and smoked and laughed, and at midnight, when his hosts had paled and my husband and I drove him back to the guest house, his energy surged as ours waned. "What charming people, but I think we exhausted them. So now we can really talk!" ("Really," i.e., the Russian way.) And we sat up till three in the morning in the empty living room of the guest house, talking about everything- because Joseph was interested in everything. We rummaged in the drawers in search of a corkscrew for another bottle of red wine, filling the quiet American lodging with clouds of forbidden smoke; we combed the kitchen in search of leftover food from the reception ("We should have hidden the lo mein. And there was some delicious chicken left; we should have stolen it.") When we finally said good-bye, my husband and I were barely alive and Joseph was still going strong.
He had an extraordinary tenderness for all his Petersburg friends, generously extolling their virtues, some of which they did not possess. When it came to human loyalty, you couldn't trust his assessments-everyone was a genius, a Mozart, one of the best poets of the twentieth century. Quite in keeping with the Russian tradition, for him a human bond was higher than Justice, and love higher than truth. Young writers and poets from Russia inundated him with their manuscripts-whenever I would leave Moscow for the United States my poetic acquaintances would bring their collections and stick them in my suitcase: "It isn't very heavy. The main thing is, show it to Brodsky. Just ask him to read it. I don't need anything else- just let him read it!" And he read and remembered, and told people that [he poems were good, and gave interviews praising the fortunate, and they kept sending their publications. And their heads turned; some said things like: "Really, there are two genuine poets in Russia: Brodsky and myself." He created the false impression of a kind of old patriarch - but if only a certain young writer whom I won't name could have heard how Brodsky groaned and moaned after obediently reading a story whose plot was built around delight in moral sordidness. "Well, all right, I realize that after this one can continue writing. But how can he go on living?"
    He didn't go to Russia. But Russia came to him. Everyone came to convince themselves that he really and truly existed, that he was alive and writing-this strange Russian poet who did not want to set foot on Russian soil. He was published in Russian in newspapers, magazines, single volumes, multiple volumes; he was quoted, referred to, studied, and published as he wished and as he didn't; he was picked apart, used, and turned into a myth. Once a poll was held on a Moscow street: "What are your hopes for the future in connection with the parliamentary elections?" A carpenter answered: "I could care less about the Parliament and politics. I just want to live a private life, like Brodsky."
    He wanted to live and not to die-neither on Vasilevsky Island nor on the island of Manhattan. He was happy, he had a family he loved, poetry, friends, readers, students. He wanted to run away from his doctors to Mount Holyoke, where he taught -then, he thought, they couldn't catch him. He wanted to elude his own prophecy: "I will fall on the asphalt between the crossed lines." He fell on the floor of his study on another island, under the crossed Russian-American lines of an `
émigré’s double fate.
And two girls-sisters from unlived years
running out on the island, wave to the boy.
And indeed he left two girls behind-his wife and daughter.
"Do you know, Joseph, if you don't want to come back a lot of fanfare, no white horses and excited crowds, why you just go to Petersburg incognito?"
"Incognito?" Suddenly he wasn't angry and didn't joke but listened very attentively.
"Yes, you know, paste on a mustache or something.  Just don't tell anyone-not a soul. You'll go, get on a trolley, down Nevsky Prospect, walk along the streets - free and unrecognized. There's a crowd, everyone's always pushing and jostling. You'll buy some ice cream. Who'll recognize you? If feel like it, you'll call your friends from a phone booth- you can say you're calling from America; or if you like you can just knock on a friend's door: 'Here I am. Just dropped by. I missed you.'"
Here I was, talking, joking, and suddenly I noticed that wasn't laughing-there was a sort of childlike expression helplessness on his face, a strange sort of dreaminess. His seemed to be looking through objects, through the edge things-on to the other side of time. He sat quietly, and I felt awkward, as if I were barging in where I wasn't invited. To dispell the feeling, I said in a pathetically hearty voice: "It's a wonderful idea, isn't it?"
He looked through me and murmured: "Wonderful. Wonderful."
1996

Bài viết này, của Tolstaya, GCC đọc, khi nó được in  trong 1 số báo - hình như tờ NYRB - như 1 bài tưởng niệm Joseph Brodsky, khi ông vừa mới mất, và có chôm 1 khúc, để tưởng niệm (cũng Joseph), nhưng mà là Huỳnh Văn.
Sau đó, đưa tờ tờ báo cho Nguyễn Tiến Văn. Anh đọc, và sau đó, than, ông đọc, và bỏ 1 khúc quá quan trọng….
Ý của anh, là, Gấu ăn hết thịt, chỉ dành cho độc giả cục xương!
Không phải như vậy.
Bài viết của Gấu, về Joseph Huỳnh Văn, chỉ mượn có 1 khúc, trong  bài viết của Tolstaya. Còn 1 khúc nữa, cũng trong bài viết, là Gấu dím lại, để dành cho bài viết về Đỗ Long Vân.
DLV và Joseph HV là bạn ở ngoài đời. Cái hình ảnh nói lên tập tục của người Nga, khi người thân mất, họ phủ kín những tấm gương...  hình ảnh này dành cho Đỗ Long Vân quá tuyệt vời.
Khi đọc bài viết, là Gấu đã giữ lại hình ảnh đó, là vậy.

Trong
From Russia With Love, tác giả cũng nhắc tới bài viết này, và cho rằng quá trễ rồi, dù rằng "wonderful": Nhà của Brodsky, là NY, không còn là Nga nữa.

NY: Home

"Do you know, Joseph, if you don't want to come back with a lot of fanfare, no white horses and excited crowds, why don't you just go to Petersburg incognito?" [. . .] Here I was talking, joking, and suddenly I noticed that he wasn't laughing [. .. ] He sat quietly, and I felt awkward, as if I were barging in where I wasn't invited. To dispel the feeling, I said in a pathetically hearty voice: "It's a wonderful idea, isn't it?" He looked through me and murmured: "Wonderful. . . Wonderful ... "
Wonderful, but too late. After all, one of Joseph's great achievements, as George Kline has pointed out, had been to throw himself into the language and literature of his adopted country. He rejected the path of nostalgia, regret, self-pity,lamentation, the fatal choice (if one can call it that) of so many émigré writers, especially poets. And what now, when he was no longer technically an involuntary exile? He had refused to complain about it, just as he refused to complain about his treatment in Russia, or his lack of a formal education. On the contrary, he had valued exile to the arctic region as liberating. And the education in question was a Soviet one, though when he said that the "earlier you get off track the better", he may not have been referring exclusively to the Soviet system.

 
 
          Thứ Sáu, ngày 8 tháng 3 năm 1996, vào lúc 5 giờ chiều, buổi tưởng niệm thi sĩ Joseph Brodsky (tháng Năm 24, 1940 - tháng Giêng 28, 1996), Nobel văn chương 1987, tại nhà thờ St. John the Divine, New York, có lẽ đã đúng như ý nguyện của ông. Thay vì cuộc sống vị kỷ, những người bạn của ông đã nhắc nhở nhau về những chu toàn, the achievements, ngôn ngữ - the language - của người quá cố:
Death will come and will find a body
whose silent peace will reflect death's approach
like any woman's face
[Tĩnh vật, trong Phần Lời, Part of Speech]
(Chết sẽ tới và sẽ thấy một xác thân
mà sự bình an lặng lẽ sẽ phản chiếu cái chết tới gần
như gương mặt của bất cứ một người đàn bà nào).

Tuy sống lưu vong gần như suốt đời, ông được coi là nhà thơ vĩ đại của cả nửa thế kỷ, và chỉ cầu mong ông sống thêm 4 năm nữa là "thế kỷ của chúng ta" có được sự tận cùng vẹn toàn. Ông rời Nga-xô đã hai chục năm, cái chết của ông khiến cho căn nhà Nga bây giờ mới thực sự trống rỗng.
 
Ông sang Mỹ, nhập tịch Mỹ, yêu nước Mỹ, làm thơ, viết khảo luận bằng tiếng Anh. Nhưng nước Nga là một xứ đáo để (Chắc đáo để cũng chẳng thua gì quê hương của mi...): Anh càng rẫy ra, nó càng bám chặt lấy anh cho tới hơi thở chót.
-Bao giờ ông về?.
-Có thể, tôi không biết. Có lẽ. Nhưng năm nay thì không. Tôi nên về. Tôi sẽ không về. Đâu có ai cần tôi ở đó.
-Đừng nói bậy, họ sẽ không để ông một mình đâu. Họ sẽ công kênh ông trên đường phố... tới tận Moscow... Tới Petersburg... Ông sẽ cưỡi ngựa trắng, nếu ông muốn.
-Đó là điều khiến tôi không muốn về. Tôi đâu cần ai ở đó.
 
*
Theo Tatyana Tolstaya, nhà văn nữ người Nga hiện đang giảng dạy môn văn chương Nga và viết văn, creative writing, tại Skidmore College, thoạt đầu, ông rất muốn về, ít nhất cũng như vậy. Ông đã từng nổi giận về những lời trách cứ. "Họ không cho phép tôi về dự đám tang ông già. Bà già chết không có tôi ở bên. Tôi hỏi xin nhưng họ từ chối". Cho dù vậy, lý do, theo Tolstaya, là ông không thể về. Ông sợ quá khứ, kỷ niệm, hồi nhớ, những ngôi mộ bị đào bới. Sợ sự yếu đuối của ông. Sợ hủy diệt những gì ông đã làm được, với quá khứ của ông, trong thi ca của ông. Ông sợ mất nó như Orpheus đã từng vĩnh viễn mất Eurydice, khi ngoái cổ nhìn lại.
 
Mỗi lần từ Nga trở về, hành trang của Tolstaya chật cứng những bản thảo của những thi sĩ, văn sĩ trẻ. "Cũng không nặng gì lắm đâu. Xin trao tận tay thi sĩ. Nói ông ta đọc. Tôi chỉ cần ông ta đọc". Ông đã đọc, đã nhớ và đã nói, thơ của họ tốt... Và ca ngợi điều may mắn. Và những nhà thơ trẻ của chúng ta đã hất hất cái đầu, ra vẻ: "Thực sự, chỉ có hai nhà thơ thứ thiệt tại Nga, Brodsky và chính tôi". Ông tạo nên một cảm tưởng giả, ông là một thứ ‘Bố già văn nghệ’. Nhưng chỉ một số ít ỏi thi sĩ trẻ đã từng nghe ông rên rỉ: Sau cái thứ này, tôi biết anh ta vẫn tiếp tục viết, nhưng làm sao anh ta tiếp tục sống!
 
Ông không tới với nước Nga, nhưng nước Nga đến với ông. Nhà thơ Nga kỳ cục không muốn bám rễ vào đất Nga.
Kỳ cục thật, bởi vì đã từ lâu, thế hệ lạc loài được Hemingway mô tả trong Mặt Trời Vẫn Mọc, The Sun Also Rises vẫn luôn luôn là một ám ảnh đối với những kẻ bị bứng ra khỏi đất. Nếu không trở nên điên điên, khùng khùng thì cũng bị thương tật, (bất lực như nhân vật chính trong Mặt Trời Vẫn Mọc), bị bệnh kín (La Mort dans l'Âme: Chết trong Tâm hồn), và chỉ là những kẻ thất bại. Đám Cộng sản trong nước chẳng vẫn thường dè bỉu một nền văn chương hải ngoại?
Nhưng Brodsky là một ngoại lệ. Nước Nga đã đến với ông. Thơ ông được xuất bản, đăng tải trên hầu hết các báo chí tại Nga. Trong một cuộc thăm dò dư luận tại đường phố Moscow: "Ông có mong ước, hy vọng gì liên quan đến cuộc bầu cử?", một người thợ mộc đã trả lời: "Tôi chỉ mong sống một cuộc đời riêng tư. Như Joseph Brodsky".
 
*
 
-Ai chỉ định anh là thi sĩ?
Đám Cộng sản Liên-xô đã từng hét vào mặt ông như vậy tại phiên tòa. Họ chẳng thèm để ý đến những tài liệu, giấy tờ chứng minh từng đồng kopech ông có được qua việc sáng tác, dịch thuật thi ca.
-Tôi nghĩ có lẽ ông Trời.
Được thôi. Và tù đầy, lưu vong.
 
Neither country nor churchyard will I choose
I'll come to Vasilevsky Island to die
(Xứ sở làm chi, phần mộ làm gì
Ta sẽ tới đảo kia để chết)

In the dark I won't find your deep blue facade
I'll fall on the asphalt between the crossed lines.
(Trong đêm tối thấy đâu, gương mặt em thăm thẳm xanh, xưa
Ta gục xuống nhựa đường đen, giữa những lằn đan chéo).
 
Những lằn đan chéo, the crossed lines, hay rõ hơn, bờ ranh Nga Mỹ phân biệt số phận hai mặt của một kẻ ăn đậu ở nhờ.
*
 
-Này thi sĩ, nếu ông muốn về không ngựa trắng mà cũng chẳng cần đám đông reo hò, ngưỡng mộ, tại sao ông không về theo kiểu giấu mặt?
-Giấu mặt?
Đột nhiên thi sĩ hết tức giận, và cũng bỏ lối nói chuyện khôi hài. Ông chăm chú nghe.
-Thì cứ dán lên một bộ râu, một hàng ria mép, đại khái như vậy. Cần nhất, đừng nói cho bất cứ một người nào. Và rồi ông sẽ dạo chơi giữa phố, giữa người, thảnh thơi và chẳng ai nhận ra ông. Nếu thích thú, ông có thể gọi điện thoại cho một người bạn từ một trạm công cộng, như thể ông từ Mỹ gọi về. Hoặc gõ cửa nhà bạn: "Tớ đây này, nhớ cậu quá!"
Giấu mặt, tuyệt vời thật!
 
==oOo==
 
 
          Joseph Huỳnh Văn là một thi sĩ. Chúng tôi quen nhau những ngày làm Tập san Văn chương. Có Nguyễn Tử Lộc, đã chết vì bệnh tại Sài-gòn ít lâu sau 75. Phạm Hoán, Phạm Kiều Tùng, Nguyễn Đạt, Nguyễn Tường Giang... Huỳnh Văn là Thư ký Tòa soạn. Không có Phạm Kiều Tùng, tập san không có một ấn loát tuyệt hảo. Nguyễn Đông Ngạc khi còn sống vẫn tự hào về cuốn Những Truyện Ngắn Hay Nhất Của Quê Hương Chúng Ta (Hai Mươi Năm Văn Học Miền Nam) do anh xuất bản, Phạm Kiều Tùng, Phạm Hoán lo in ấn, trình bày. Bạn lấy đầu một cây kim chấm một đầu trang. Dấu chấm đó sẽ xuyên suốt mọi đầu trang thường của cuốn sách. Không có Nguyễn Tường Giang thì không đào đâu ra tiền và mối thiện cảm, độc giả, thân hữu quảng cáo dành cho tập san. Những bài khảo luận của Nguyễn Tử Lộc và sở học của anh chiết ra từ những dòng thác ngầm của nhân loại - dòng văn chương Anglo-Saxon - làm ngỡ ngàng đám chúng tôi, những đứa chỉ mê đọc sách Tây, một căn bệnh ấu trĩ nhằm tỏ sự khó chịu vì sự có mặt của những quân nhân Hoa-kỳ tại Miền Nam.
 
Huỳnh Văn với lối nói mi mi tau tau là chất keo mà một người Thư ký Tòa soạn cần để kết hợp anh em. Bây giờ nghĩ lại chính thơ anh mới là tinh thần Tập San Văn Chương. Đó là nơi xuất hiện Cầm Dương Xanh , những bài thơ đầu mà có lẽ cũng là cuối của anh. Bởi vì sau đó, anh không đăng thơ nữa, tuy chắc chắn vẫn làm thơ, hoặc tìm thấy thơ trên những vân gỗ, khi anh làm nghề thợ mộc, những ngày sau 75, thay cho nghề bán cháo phổi, những ngày trước đó.
 
"Mỗi thời đại, con người tự chọn mình khi đứng trước tha nhân, tình yêu, và cái chết." (Sartre, Situations). Trong thơ Nguyễn Bắc Sơn, tha nhân là những người ở bên kia bờ địa ngục, và chiến tranh chỉ là một cuộc rong chơi. Nguyễn Đức Sơn tìm thấy Cửa Thiền ở một nơi khác, ở Đêm Nguyệt Động chẳng hạn. Thanh Tâm Tuyền muốn trút cơn đau của thơ vào thiên nhiên:
Mùa này gió biển thổi điên lên lục địa...
 
Còn Huỳnh Văn, có vẻ như anh chẳng màng chi đến cuộc chiến, hoặc cuộc chiến tránh né anh. Tinh thần mắt bão của thiên nhiên thời tiết, hay tinh thần mắt nghe, l'oeil qui écoute, của Maurice Blanchot?
Ôi khúc Cầm Dương sầu quí phái
Đàn ai xanh ngát Trời Tây Phương.
 
Thơ anh là một ngạc nhiên, hồi đó.
Và tôi vẫn còn ngạc nhiên, bây giờ, khi được tin anh mất. (1)
Khi liên tưởng đến câu thơ của một người bạn:
Hồn Đông Phương thất lạc buồn Phương Tây
(thơ TKA)

Tôi không biết có phải Trời Tây Phương của anh lấy từ ý thơ cổ:
Vọng Mỹ Nhân hề, thiên nhất phương
(Có thể mượn ý niệm "con người hoàn toàn" (l'homme total), hay giấc đại mộng của Marx, làm nhịp cầu liên tưởng, để thấy rằng những Mỹ Nhân, Đấng Quân Vương, Thánh Chúa... trong thi ca Đông Phương không hẳn chỉ là những giấc mộng điên cuồng của thi sĩ):
Vọng Mỹ nhân hề, thiên nhất phương
Vọng Mỹ nhân hề, vị lai
Đọc trong nước, có vẻ như Thơ đang trên đường đi tìm một Mỹ nhân cho cả ngôn ngữ lẫn cuộc đời.
Và Buồn Phương Tây, có thể từ ý thơ Quang Dũng:
Mắt em dìu dịu buồn Tây Phương
(Tây Phương trong thơ Quang Dũng là Tây Phương Cực Lạc của một cõi Chùa Thầy, Sơn Tây, và cũng còn là vẻ đẹp của các cô thiếu nữ vùng này).
Hay Tây Phương là cõi lưu đầy của lũ chúng tôi mà Joseph Huỳnh Văn đã nhìn thấy từ bao năm trước:
Khuya nức nở những cõi lòng không ngủ
Đợi vì sao dậy sớm tiễn người đi.

-Tau đây này. Nhớ mi quá!

Nguyễn Quốc Trụ
_________
 
(1) Joseph Huỳnh Văn Hiến mất ngày 20/2/1995 tại Sài Gòn.
 
Vô Kỵ Giữa Chúng Ta

Đỗ Long Vân, tác giả Truyện Kiều ABC, Vô Kỵ Giữa Chúng Ta, Nguồn Nước Ẩn Trong Thơ Hồ Xuân Hương... đã mất tháng Tám năm vừa qua (1997), tại quê nhà. Người biết chỉ được tin, qua mấy dòng nhắn tin, trong mục thư tín, trên tạp chí Văn Học, số tháng Ba, 1998.
Ngay từ trước 1975, ông đã sống một cuộc sống lặng lẽ, "từ chối" mọi đặc quyền, nếu có thể gọi đây là một đặc quyền mà chế độ Miền Nam dành cho những người có bằng cấp: được đi học trường sĩ quan Thủ Đức. Khi bị gọi động viên, ông đã trình diện như là "lính trơn", nghĩa là chẳng trưng ra những bằng cấp, chẳng nhớ gì (?) tới những năm tháng du học Paris. Bạn với một số bạn lặng lẽ: Joseph Huỳnh Văn, Phạm Kiều Tùng, hình như có cả Nguyễn Tử Lộc, và đứa em út trong bọn, Nguyễn Đạt (gọi là em út, vì nhà thơ này là em ruột Nguyễn Nhật Duật), nghĩa là hầu hết anh em trong nhóm Tập San Văn Chương. Khi cả bọn xúm nhau làm tờ báo, chỉ có Joseph Huỳnh Văn,"Tổng Thư Ký" tòa soạn, mới đủ tư cách mang "cẩm nang võ công của Trương Tam Phong, tổ sư phái Võ Đang", nói nôm na, những bài Cầm Dương Xanh của anh, tới "Thiếu Lâm Tự", Bắc Đẩu Võ Lâm, để đổi lấy một cách đọc bí kíp/văn bản: Hãy đọc ở độ thấp nhất, mức độ ABC, của nó.
Tôi chỉ còn giữ được một kỷ niệm về Đỗ quân, về Nguồn Nước Ẩn, khi cuốn sách được xuất bản, thời gian tôi đang phụ trách trang Văn Học Nghệ Thuật cho một nhật báo. Bèn viết bài giới thiệu.
Phải nói rõ một điều: Đỗ Long Vân, cũng như tôi, và nhiều người khác nữa, đều có chung một số ông thầy. Và cái trường phái võ học/văn chương đang thịnh hành hồi đó là cơ cấu luận, với những đại gia như Roland Barthes, Claude Lévi-Strauss... Khi đọc Nguồn Nước Ẩn, trí óc tôi còn tràn ngập những hình ảnh, những chiêu thức phê bình văn chương, thí dụ như, phê bình là siêu-ngôn ngữ, phê bình là một bản văn (choàng, cover) trên một bản văn, là sáng tạo của sáng tạo... Nói tóm lại, tôi không đọc tác phẩm của Đỗ quân, mà chỉ lo ca tụng nguồn võ công đã sản xuất ra một chiêu thức kỳ tuyệt như thế.
Vẫn là câu chuyện Cửu Dương Chân Kinh, của Thiếu Lâm, và võ công của Trương Tam Phong, tổ sư Võ Đang. Tuy thoát thai từ Cửu Dương Công, nhưng Miên Chưởng, Thái Cực Quyền/Kiếm... là hoàn toàn do Trương Tam Phong tổ sư sáng tạo ra. Theo nghĩa đó, Cửu Dương thần công chỉ đạt tới mức siêu việt của nó, qua nhân vật Vô Kỵ, người mang trong mình tất cả những võ công chính tà: Cửu Dương/Càn Khôn Đại Nã Di. Nếu không có Trương Tam Phong, không có Cửu Dương Công, bởi vì nó sẽ mục nát trong Tàng Kinh Các, hay mãi mãi "ở trong dầu", tức là trong bụng một con vượn.
Đây một chân lý văn chương/võ học, theo ý nghĩa của Borges, khi ông viết về Kafka: mỗi nhà văn phải sáng tạo ra những tiền thân của riêng người đó. Bản thân Borges ảnh hưởng nặng nề Kafka, nhưng giữa những ngụ ngôn của ông, và của Kafka là một khoảng cách vời vợi.
Buổi sáng đó, Đỗ quân rời núi, tới chùa (quán Cái Chùa, ở đường Tự Do, Sài-gòn); khi một người nào đó, cùng ngồi bàn, nhắc tới bài điểm sách, và cho rằng, đây là những lời khen tác giả Nguồn Nước Ẩn, ông nhìn tôi, cười: Bạn ơi, bạn đâu có khen tôi, mà là khen Roland Barthes.

Tatyana Tolstaya, trong một bài tưởng niệm nhà thơ Joseph Brodsky, có nhắc đến một cổ tục của người dân Nga, khi trong nhà có người ra đi, họ lấy khăn phủ kín những tấm gương, sợ người thân còn nấn ná bịn rịn, sẽ đau lòng không còn nhìn thấy bóng mình ở trong đó; bà tự hỏi: làm sao phủ kín những con đuờng, những sông, những núi... nhà thơ vẫn thường soi bóng mình lên đó?
Chúng ta quá cách xa, những con đường, những sông, những núi, quá cách xa con người Đỗ Long Vân, khi ông còn cũng như khi ông đã mất. Qua một người quen, tôi được biết, những ngày sau 1975, ông sống lặng lẽ tại một căn hộ ở đường Hồ Biểu Chánh, đọc, phần lớn là khoa học giả tưởng, dịch bộ "Những Hệ Thống Mỹ Học" của Alain. Khi người bạn ngỏ ý mang đi, ra ngoài này in, ông ngẫm nghĩ rồi lắc đầu: Thôi để cho PKT ở đây, lo việc này giùm tôi....
NQT
From Russia With Love

* *

Reading in Iowa City, Iowa
Đọc thơ ở Iowa City
SOME YEARS ago, Joseph came to Iowa City, the University of Iowa where I directed the Translation Workshop, to give a reading; I was to read the English translation. At the end, he was asked a number of (mostly loaded) questions, including one (alluded to earlier) about Solzhenitsyn. "And the legend which had been built around him?" His answer managed to be both artfully diplomatic and truthful: "Well, let's put it this way. I'm awfully proud that I'm writing in the same language as he does." (Note, again, how he expresses this sentiment in terms of language.) He continued, in his eccentrically pedagogical manner, forceful, even acerbic, but at the same time disarming, without any personal animus: "As for legend ... you shouldn't worry or care about legend, you should read the work. And what kind of legend? He has his biography ... and he has his words. "For Joseph a writer's words were his biography, literally!
    On another visit to Iowa, in 1987, Joseph flew in at around noon and at once asked me what I was doing that day. I told him that I was scheduled to talk to an obligatory comparative literature class about translation. "Let's do it together", he said. Consequently I entered the classroom, with its small contingent of graduate students, accompanied by that year's Nobel Laureate.
    Joseph indicated that he would just listen, but soon he was engaging me in a dialogue, except it was more monologue than dialogue. Finally, he was directly answering questions put to him by the energized students. I wish I could remember what was said, but, alas, even the gist of it escapes me now. I did not debate with him, even though our views on the translation of verse form differed radically. Instead, I believe that I nudged him a little, trying - not very sincerely or hopefully, though perhaps in a spirit of hospitality and camaraderie - to find common ground. After the class, I walked back with him to his hotel, as he said he wanted to rest before the reading. On the way, the conversation, at my instigation, turned to Zbigniew Herbert, the Polish poet so greatly admired by Milosz and, I presumed, by Brodsky, and indeed translated by the former into English and by the latter into Russian. Arguably, Herbert was the preeminent European poet of his remarkable generation. He was living in Paris and apparently was not in good health. "Why hasn't Zbigniew been awarded the Nobel Prize? Can't something be done about it", I blurted out - recklessly, tactlessly, presumptuously. The subtext was: Surely you, Joseph Brodsky, could use your influence, etc. Joseph came to a standstill: "Of course, he should have it. But nobody knows how that happens. It's a kind of accident." He locked eyes with me. "You're looking at an accident right now!" This was not false modesty on his part, but doubtless he was being more than a little disingenuous. Nevertheless, I believe that, at a certain level, he did think of his laureateship as a kind of accident. Paradoxically, while he aimed as high as may be, he was not in the business of rivalling or challenging the great. They remained, in a sense, beyond him, this perception of destiny and of a hierarchy surely being among his saving graces.
    In a far deeper sense, though, they were not in the least beyond him, nor was he uncompetitive, but it did not (nor could it) suit his public or even private persona to display this.
     Brodsky certainly considered himself to be - and it is increasingly clear that he was - in the grand line that included Anna Akhmatova, Boris Pasternak, Osip Mandelstam and Marina Tsvetayeva. Even I sensed this, despite my ambivalence about his poetry. Indeed, the continuity embodied in his work accounts, in part, for my uncertainty: I have tended to rebel against grand traditions. But perhaps this is to exaggerate. At times I hear the music, at other times the man, even if, as a rule, I do not hear them both together ... But take, for instance, this (the last three stanzas of "Nature Morte" in George Kline's splendid version in the Penguin Selected Poems):    
Mary now speaks to Christ:
"Are you my son? - or God?
You are nailed to the cross.
Where lies my homeward road?
How can I close my eyes,
uncertain and afraid?
Are you dead? - or alive?
Are you my son? - or God?
Christ speaks to her in turn:
"Whether dead or alive,
Woman, it's all the same-
son or God, I am thine."
It is true that, as I listen to or read the English, I hear the Russian too, in Joseph's rendition. I even see Joseph, his hands straining the pockets of his jacket, his jaw jutting, as though his eye had just been caught by something and he were staring at it, scrutinizing it, while continuing to mouth the poem, almost absent- mindedly, that is, while the poem continues to be mouthed by him. His voice rises symphonically: Syn ili Bog (Son or God), "God" already (oddly?) on the turn towards an abrupt descent; and then the pause and a resonant drop, a full octave: Ya tvoi (I am thine). And the poet, with an almost embarrassed or reluctant nod, and a quick, pained smile, departs his poem.
Daniel Weissbort: From Russia With Love

Note: Bài này cũng cực thú. Bị khán giả chất vấn, mi so sao với Solz, Brodsky bèn trả lời, tớ có cái hãnh diện là viết bằng cùng thứ tiếng với ông ta:
"And the legend which had been built around him?" His answer managed to be both artfully diplomatic and truthful: "Well, let's put it this way. I'm awfully proud that I'm writing in the same language as he does." (Note, again, how he expresses this sentiment in terms of language.)

Chỉ có hai nhà thơ sống "sự thực tuyệt đối" của thời chúng ta, bằng cuộc đời “đơn” của họ, là Brodsky và TTT!

Son of Man and Son of God
Tuesday, July 29, 2014 4:11 PM
Thưa ông Gấu,
Xin góp ý với ông Gấu về một đoạn thơ đã post trên trang Tinvan.
Nguyên tác:
Christ speaks to her in turn:
“Whether dead or alive
woman, it’s all the same –
son or God, I am thine 
Theo tôi, nên dịch như sau:
Christ bèn trả lời:
Chết hay là sống,
Thưa bà, thì đều như nhau –
Con, hay Chúa, ta là của bà 
Best regards,
DHQ
 
Phúc đáp:
Đa tạ. Đúng là Gấu dịch trật, mà đúng là 1 câu quá quan trọng.
Tks again.
Best Regards
NQT

Note: Không làm sao kiếm ra khúc dịch trật nữa!

Son of Man and Son of God (2)
Today at 12:02 PM
Dear ông Gấu
Cháu xin phép giúp ông tìm lại bản dịch "trật"
Mary nói với Christ:
Mi là con ta? - hay là Chúa Trời?
Mi bị đóng đinh thập tự.
Đâu là con đường trở về quê hương của ta?
Mary now speaks to Christ:
"Are you my son-or God?
You are nailed to the cross
Where lies my homeward road?

Can I pass throught my gate
not having understood:
Are you dead ? - or alive?
Are you my son - or God?
Christ bèn trả lời:
Chết hay là sống,
Đàn bà, thì đều như nhau –
Con, hay Chúa, ta là thine
Christ speaks to her in turn:
“Whether dead or alive
woman, it’s all the same –
son or God, I am thine
Best regards,
 Phúc đáp:
Tks
Take Care
Như vậy là GCC không dịch được từ “thine”, và không hiểu, từ "woman", trong câu thơ.

…   Anh khoe khong?
K
OK rồi, không què đâu. Tks
NQT
Mạnh khỏe la vui roi!
O.

Tks. Tưởng là què luôn.
V/v Đi tu tới bến.
Tôi đang đọc Weil, cũng có cảm giác đó
Bác Tru theo dao nao vậy?
Toi theo dao tho ong ba
Den gia, doc Weil, thi lai tiec.
Gia ma tre theo dao Ky To, chac là thành quả nhiều hơn, khi doc Weil.

NY: Nhà
Khi chàng già đi, có tuổi mãi ra  – những năm sau cùng, chàng già hơi bị nhanh, như muốn bắt kịp khúc chót, hoặc tóm lấy nó, vượt quá nó, nếu có thể, hà, hà… - một thứ âu lo về đời, nhìn lại đời mình “cái con mẹ gì đó”, thay thế cái vẻ chua chát trước đó, nhưng ngay cả như thế, thì thế giới vưỡn là 1 nơi chốn tuyệt vời. Sức sáng tạo của Joseph vưỡn chưa bỏ chạy chàng!
Nói về những nơi chốn tuyệt vời, một đấng Joseph của Thành Phố Nữu Ước, mặt mũi ra sao, nhỉ?
Đây là nhà của chàng hầu hết thời gian ở Tây Phương, ngay cả, kể từ năm 1981, chàng dạy học vào mùa Xuân ở Mount Holyoke College và mướn 1 căn nhà tại South Hadley. Chàng lại có thói quen trải qua Noel ở Venice. Chàng Joseph mà tôi biết thì là một Joseph Nữu Ước [Joseph của Gấu thì ở Trương Minh Giảng, gần Cổng Xe Lửa Số 6], mặc dù tôi gặp chàng trước tiên là ở London, và ít ra, thập niên 1970, thường gặp chàng ở đó, lần gặp đầu tiên, là ở Ann Arbor, Micgigan. Tôi chỉ thăm chàng 1 lần, ở Emily Dickinson country.
Nữu Ước trở thành nhà của chàng, và chàng ở nhà của chàng ở Nữu Ước. Thì sự thể nó là như thế. Thành phố cho phép ( hay khuyến khích?), chàng muốn là cái đéo gì tùy chàng, nghĩa là, bất cứ cái đéo gì chàng muốn từ nó [hail from], không chỉ cái chuyện tao muốn làm kẻ lạ, kẻ đứng bên lề, người dưng, muốn sao được thế, người ơi.
Mọi người, bất cứ một ai, thì cũng là cả hai, kẻ lạ và kẻ nội. Sống ở Nữu Ước là thành một kẻ sinh ở Nữu Ước. Nếu Joseph thoải mái nhất với… Joseph, thì đó là một Joseph Nữu Ước [như Joseph Trương Minh Giảng của GCC].
Nhưng có cái gì khác nữa.

*

From Russia With Love

Tiếng Nga dịch được không?
Is Russian Translatable?
Theo Milosz, đếch dịch được!
Czeslaw Milosz, whom Joseph regarded as one of the preeminent poets of our time, re-iterated his belief that Russian poetry was "hardly translatable because of its particular features - strongly rhymed singsong verses among them". He added: "Modern Polish poetry does a little better because, in contrast to Russian, the Polish language benefits from abandoning both meter and rhyme, so that equivalents in English can more easily be found." He also believed, however, that the situation had improved somewhat, as a result of the increasing collaboration between poets in English and poets in the source language. The review in question is of a collaborative translation by Stanislaw Baranczak (Polish poet, essayist and Shakespeare translator, also the translator of Brodsky into Polish) and Seamus Heaney, the 1995 Nobel Laureate.
Milosz mà Brodsky coi như một trong những nhà thơ uyên bác nhất của thời của chúng ta, nhắc lại cái niềm tin của ông, là thơ Nga thật khó dịch, vì những câu thơ của chúng thì chẳng khác chi những lời ca trầm bổng giữa chúng mí nhau [tạm dịch cái ý “strongly rhymed singsongs verses among them”]. Thơ Ba Lan hiện đại dễ dịch hơn, vì ngược với thơ Nga, ngôn ngữ Ba Lan hưởng lợi nhờ cái cú, từ bỏ cả “meter” lẫn “rhyme”, thành ra dễ có từ tương đương trong tiếng Anh.

From Russia With Love


Cái tôi phóng chiếu
"Nobody in a raincoat": "Chẳng là ai trong cái áo mưa"

Note: Bài viết này quả là hết xẩy con cào cào!
Chúng ta đã biết Brodsky ra tòa VC Liên Xô, và trả lời, khi chúng hỏi, Ai cho phép mi là thi sĩ?

Bài này thú vị hơn nhiều:
Chàng, qua Tây Phương, lần đầu đăng đàn phán về thơ, giữa cử tọa Tây Phương!
Tin Văn sẽ đi 1 đường dịch thuật liền, như món quà chờ...  Noel.
IN THE OTHER hand, when Joseph left Russia, when he read for the first time in the West, at that poetry festival in London, he may well have been quite surprised at the enthusiasm of the audience. It is conceivable, even likely, that he had no inkling of what to expect. Of course, though still young, he was not new to the game. He had been translated, had become the object of what were in effect cultural pilgrimages, had been pilloried by the state, was close to the last of the great ones, Akhmatova. And then there were his readings in Russia (remember Etkind's description, cited above). I suppose he was already a cult figure, whatever that may mean, or well on his way to becoming one. So he was surely aware of the hallucinatory effect of his performances. Even so, there was no telling whether this would turn out to be exportable. Traumatized as Joseph evidently was, that first reading at the Queen Elizabeth Hall at once set him on the path. He gave reading after reading. He did not let the sound fade, or himself go out of fashion, be lost sight of. He kept himself, the sound of himself, current. In one respect, this can be seen as a triumph of the will to survive, though he may also have needed constant exposure of this sort to compensate for the loss of a native audience. And in any case, as we have seen, he regarded it as his particular mission - though he might have balked at putting it so grandly - to bring Russian to English. And beyond that, of course, was the larger mission, on behalf of Poetry itself. And there must have been a price to pay, that of privacy, of the seclusion most artists need. Still, he also had the invaluable knack of being just himself. And periodically, as at Christmas when he went to Venice, he became a "nobody in a raincoat".
    Or do I exaggerate? Was he, in fact, misled? Did he misunderstand the interest his person or presence aroused? Perhaps it was more a matter of curiosity. He had become a sort of institution, America's Poet-in-Exile. And as for his odd English, well, away with it, who cared really. It had seemed to me, from the start, that Joseph was a great improviser. He had not quite anticipated the reception he received, but he adjusted readily enough to it. And as for his style of reading, well, as noted, he claimed it was simply the way poetry was read in Russia. But even his disingenuousness worked to his advantage. So, perhaps it was all a kind of improvisation. He relied on the challenge of live situations, on his wit and his wits, on language itself. Joseph had faith. He adopted a casual manner, even though the delivery of the poetry was quite the opposite to casual. He resisted being turned into a monument, an institution, although he himself raised monuments to those he regarded as his mentors: Tsvetayeva, Mandelstam, Akhmatova, Frost, Auden.
Về mặt khác, khi Joseph rời Nga, khi chàng đọc thơ lần thứ nhất ở Tây Phương, tại hội thơ ở London, chàng làm sao mà không ngạc nhiên, trước thái độ niềm nở của khán thính giả. Cũng dễ hiểu, bởi là vì chàng có hy vọng chi đâu. Lẽ dĩ nhiên, chàng không phải tay mơ trong nghề chơi. Đã từng được dịch diệc, đã từng trải mùi đời, đã từng bị VC Nga đọa đầy chẳng khác gì Akhmatova. Thành thử, khi đăng đàn đọc thơ, chàng đã là 1 thứ tầm cỡ, một hình tượng văn hóa, một nhân vật thờ, a cult figure, nhưng gì thì gì, chẳng làm sao biết, sau cùng sự đời sẽ ra sao!
Bị chấn thương như thế, vậy mà, lần thứ nhất đọc thơ, liền lập tức, chàng nhập vai liền. Chàng đọc hết bài thơ này tới bài thơ khác, không để cho âm thanh, giọng thơ, không khí thơ…. chìm đi, nhạt đi, dù chỉ 1 phút; không để cho chính mình trở thành 1 thứ lỗi điệu, chìm vào hư vô, thì cứ nói đại như thế, hà, hà!
Nói 1 cách trang trọng, ở đây, chính là sự thành công, sự lên ngôi của cái ý chí, cái ước mong sống sót, và hơn cả thế nữa, [kinh thế chứ]: Tao, tao sẽ mang thơ Nga đến cho lũ độc giả Tây Phương!
[to bring Russian to English: Đem tiếng Nga đến cho tiếng Anh]
Đây là bù trừ. Chàng mất khán thính giả Niên Xô, thì có khán thính giả Tây Phương. Không chỉ như 1 thiên sứ của....  Sến - đem tiếng Nga tới cho tiếng Anh - còn là : Nhân danh Thơ, chính nó!
Tất nhiên cũng phải trả giá. Cái tư riêng, cõi riêng, như của Kiệt, mà bà vợ Thùy rất ư là bực. (1)
Tuy nhiên với Brodsky, chàng có 1 cái mánh thần tình, để vưỡn là mình. Lần Giáng Sinh, tới Venice, thoắt 1 phát, chàng trở thành "chẳng là ai trong cái áo mưa".

Thùy ngồi ngả trong ghế. Ở đi văng xa, Kiệt đang xỏ giầy. Nàng nhếch mép khinh bạc. Kiệt trừng trừng, hung hãn, xong cúi buộc giây giầy. Ngửng lên hắn lại nhìn nàng. Nàng giữ nguyên vẻ mặt thách thức. Hắn thở phì, nhắm mắt rồi bỗng cười. Nụ cười lặng lẽ, mở rộng, lay động khuôn mặt ngẩn ngơ.
Phút ấy Thùy tỉnh ngộ dưới mắt Kiệt nàng không là gì. Hắn cười trong cõi riêng. Từ bao giờ hắn vẫn sống trong cõi riêng, với nàng bên cạnh. Phát giác đột ngột làm nàng tủi hận nhưng giúp nàng cứng cỏi thêm trong thái độ lựa chọn. Hắn coi thường nàng trong bao lâu nay nàng không hay và hắn phải chịu sự khinh miệt rẻ rúng của nàng từ nay.
Thùy đi ngang mặt Kiệt, vào giường. Vài phút nữa Kiệt đi. Kiệt trở về hoặc không trở về chẳng còn làm bận được đầu óc nàng. Giữa nàng và Kiệt tuyệt không còn một câu nào để nói với nhau. Hai người đã đứng hai bên một bức tường kính.
Giấc ngủ đến với Thùy mau không ngờ. Kiệt đi nàng không hay. (1)

From Russia With Love

*

[from Akhmatova: Selected Poems]


Dante
Chàng đếch thèm trở lại
Ngay cả sau khi mất
Thành phố Hà Lội của chàng
Rời bỏ, chàng đi thẳng một mách
Vì chàng mà tôi hát bài hát này
Đêm. Một bó đuốc. Nụ hôn sau cùng.
Bên ngoài, âm thanh số mệnh – Như gió hú
Từ Địa Ngục, chàng gửi cho nàng một lời trù ẻo.
Ở Thiên Đàng, nàng vẫn giữ chàng ở trong đầu
Chàng không bước chân trần, muộn trong đêm
Bị quyến rũ, như 1 tên tội đồ
Qua Hà Lội - phản bội, đầy hờn oán
Thành phố chàng chân thành ao ước.
In August 1936, Akhmatova devoted a poem to Dante, emphasizing as the archetypal poet in exile, playing the same role as Ovid did in Pushkin’s work. Like Akhmatova's Petersburg, Dante's Florence represents a way of life and thought. In his case it will be lost to him because he was exiled for his beliefs. The poem may also be an indirect allusion to Mandelstam, another poet in exile. Dante was forced to leave his beloved city in 1302 after the victory of the opposing party. Several years later he was offered the possibility of returning under condition of a humiliating public repentance, which he spurned. He refused to walk "with a lighted candle"-the ritual of repentance-even to be able to return to Florence. Unlike Lot's wife, he refused to look back.
Dante
Il mio bel San Giovanni
-Dante
Even after his death he did not return
To his ancient Florence.
To the one who, leaving, did not look back,
To him I sing this song.
Torch, the night, the last embrace,
Beyond the threshold, the wild wail of fate.
From hell he sent her curses
And in paradise he could not forget her-
But barefoot, in a hairshirt,
With a lighted candle he did not walk
Through his Florence-his beloved,
Perfidious, base, longed for ...
(II, p. 117)
In another of her lyrical portraits, "Cleopatra" (February 1940), Akhmatova deals with the theme of a great figure facing humiliation. Here she depicts an who chooses to end her life rather than submit to authority:
Cleopatra
Alexandria's palaces
Were covered with sweet shade.
-Pushkin
 She had already kissed Antony's dead lips,
And on her knees before Augustus had poured out her tears . . .
And the servants betrayed her. Victorious trumpets blare
Under the Roman eagle, and the mist of evening drifts.
Then enters the last captive of her beauty,
Tall and grave, and he whispers in embarrassment:
"You-like a slave ... will be led before him in the triumph ... "
But the swan's neck remains peacefully inclined.
And tomorrow they'll put the children in chains. Oh,
how little remains
For her to do on earth-joke a little with this boy
And, as if in a valedictory gesture of compassion,
Place the black viper on her dusky breast with an indifferent hand.
(II, p. 119)
While refusing to accept suicide as a solution to her own grief, Akhmatova describes the state of mind of a great queen who does, rather than render unto Cesar what he wishes-her submission. As in many of Akhmatova's poems, there is an implicit "prehistory." Cleopatra is shown at the moment before her death. Antony has been defeated by Augustus Caesar and has committed suicide, now Caesar wishes the glorious Queen of Egypt to be paraded like a slave before him. In a few telling details, Akhmatova reveals that rather than encounter self-imposed death with hysteria, Cleopatra greets it with dignified restraint. In antiquity, Cleopatra's suicide was viewed as an act of courage, but for a faithful ever in Christianity, it was not a viable option. Instead, Akhmatova's "inner peace” and strength enabled her to endure.
Akh: Thi sĩ, Tiên tri: The Great Terror: 1930-1939
Brodsky had written his poem to her [Akhmatova] earlier that year:
… I did not see, will not see your tears,
I will not hear the rustling of wheels,
carrying you to the bay, to the trees,
along the fatherland without a memorial to you.

In a  warm room, as I recall, without books,
without admirers, but there you are for them,
resting your brow on your palm,
you will write about us on a slant

Bài thơ Brodsky tặng Akhmatova.
Bà sẽ viết về chúng tôi trong dáng nghiêng, trên con dốc nghiêng...
Chúng tôi ở đây, là "những dứa trẻ mồ côi của Akh", gồm bốn đứa: Brodsky, Nayman, Rein và Bobyshev.
Cùng năm đó, 1962, bà chị đã tiên tri ra được số phận của đứa em nhà thơ của mình: 
I don't weep for myself now,
But let me not be on earth to witness
The golden stamp of failure
On this yet untroubled brow.
(II, p. 223)
 (Bây giờ tôi không khóc cho chính tôi
 Nhưng cầu sao, tôi đừng có mặt trên trái đất để chứng kiến
 Ấn thích vàng của sự thất bại
 Trên hàng mi chưa nhuốm sầu này).
With her usual gift for prophecy and insight, she predicted destiny would soon Brodsky's ability to endure adversity.
One time, in 1962, Bobyshev brought Akhmatova a poem he had written for along with a bouquet of five beautiful roses. It was her birthday, and she was at Komarovo. Akhmatova mentioned the roses on his next visit, saying, of them soon faded, but the fifth bloomed extraordinarily well and created almost flying around the room." Soon the young poets found out what "miracle" was-Akhmatova had written poems to them. "The Last Rose" devoted to Brodsky, "The Fifth Rose" to Bobyshev, and "Non-existence" to . The poem to Brodsky was the one she recited to Robert Frost when he to see her. In it she asks God to let her live a simple life and not share the fate of famous women in history like Joan of Arc and Dido. She opens an epigraph containing a line from Brodsky: "You will write about us on a " which appeared when Akhmatova's poem was first published, but disappeared after Brodsky's trial.
Brodsky had written his poem to her earlier that year…
Akhmatova: Kinh Cầu
Chẳng có ai người cười nổi, những ngày đó
Ngoại trừ những người chết, sau cùng tìm thấy sự bình an
Như 1 cánh tay thừa thãi, 1 sức nặng vô dụng
Hà Nội đong đưa quanh Hỏa Lò
Hàng theo hàng, đám Ngụy diễu [không phải diễn] hành,
Khùng vì đau, nhắm nỗi bất hạnh của họ
Bài ca vĩnh biệt, sắc, gọn
Tiếng còi tầu chở súc vật rú lên
 Ngôi sao thần chết đứng sững trên nền trời Hà Nội
 Và xứ Bắc Kít, ngây thơ vô tội,
 Quằn quại dưới gót giầy máu
 Dưới bánh xe chở tù.
 Không phải tôi. Ai đó đau khổ
Tôi làm sao chịu nổi nỗi đau đó
 Hãy choàng nó bằng vải liệm đen
 Và mang đèn đi chỗ khác
Đêm rồi!
Akhmatova, có vẻ như được sửa soạn để đóng cái vai của bà, hơn hầu hết những nhà thơ cùng thời. Ngoài ra, vào lúc xẩy ra Cách Mạng, bà 28 tuổi , không quá trẻ để tin hay không tin, và cũng không quá già để biện minh cho nó. Sau đó, là 1 người đàn bà, trong vai “gái” [“cái” cũng được] thì cũng khó mà thổi Cách Mạng, hay kết án nó. Bà cũng không quyết định thay đổi trật tự xã hội….
Đọc bài viết của Brodsky về Akhmatova, nữ thần thơ bi ai Nga, thì Gấu ngộ ra điều, tại sao mà GCC này chịu không nổi, phải nói, tởm, cái giọng của đám VC ly khai, thứ ngôn ngữ nhơ bẩn, “máu què”, thí dụ, cũng như cái giọng gà mái gáy của Sến, vẫn thí dụ.
Nhà thơ chỉ phán một câu thôi: Bà nhận ra nỗi đau, she recognized grief.
Và trước đó, Brodsky giải thích:
 Bà không vứt Cách Mạng vào thùng rác. Một dáng đứng thách đố cũng đếch hợp với bà. Bà giản dị coi nó như là nó có, và chấp nhận nó, như là nó xẩy ra: cơn đau của cả nước, đau chừng nào, nỗi đau của mỗi cá nhân, đau theo chừng đó.
 The poet is a born democrat not thanks to the precariousness of his position only but because he caters to the entire nation and employs its language: Nhà thơ sinh ra, và bèn dân chủ, không phải chỉ vì cái bấp bênh của dáng đứng, vị trí của mình, mà còn bởi cái sự mua vui cho đời, cho cả nước, và sử dụng cái ngôn ngữ của nó.
 Cũng thế, là bi kịch.
Đâu có phải cứ đụng tới chữ nghĩa, tới văn chương, tới thơ ca, là vãi nước đái ra, hoặc văng tục, hoặc gáy?
 Bearing the Burden of Witness:
 Requiem
 Requiem was born of an event that was personally shattering and at the same time horrifically common: the unjust arrest and threatened death of a loved one. It is thus a work with both a private and a public dimension, a lyric and an epic poem. As befits a lyric poem, it is a first-person work arising from an individual's experiences and perceptions. Yet there is always a recognition, stated or unstated, that while the narrator's sufferings are individual they are anything but unique: as befits an epic poet, she speaks of the experience of a nation.
 The Word That Causes Death’s Defeat
 Cái từ đuổi Thần Chết chạy có cờ
Kinh Cầu đẻ ra từ một sự kiện, nỗi đau cá nhân xé ruột xé gan, và cùng lúc, nó lại rất là của chung của cả nước, một cách cực kỳ ghê rợn: cái sự bắt bớ khốn kiếp của nhà nước và cái chết đe dọa người thân thương ruột thịt. Bởi thế mà nó có 1 kích thước vừa rất đỗi riêng tư vừa rất ư mọi người, rất ư công chúng, một bài thơ trữ tình và cùng lúc, sử thi. Nó là tác phẩm của ngôi thứ nhất, thoát ra từ kinh nghiệm, cảm nhận cá nhân. Tuy nhiên, trong lúc chỉ là 1 cá nhân đau đớn rên rỉ như thế, thì nó lại là độc nhất: như sử thi, bài thơ nói lên kinh nghiệm toàn quốc gia….
Đáp ứng, của Akhmatova, khi Nikolai Gumuilyov, chồng bà, 35 tuổi, thi sĩ, nhà ngữ văn, trong danh sách 61 người, bị xử bắn không cần bản án, vì tội âm mưu, phản cách mạng, cho thấy quyết tâm của bà, vinh danh người chết và gìn giữ hồi ức của họ giữa người sống, the determination to honor the dead, and to preserve their memory among the living….

Trong 1 bài viết trên talawas, đại thi sĩ Kinh Bắc biện hộ cho cái sự ông ngồi nắn nón viết tự kiểm theo lệnh Tố Hữu, để được tha về nhà tiếp tục làm thơ, và tìm lá diêu bông, rằng, cái âm điệu thơ Kinh [quá] Bắc [Kít] của ông, buồn rầu, bi thương, đủ chửi bố Cách Mạng của VC rồi.
Theo sự hiểu biết cá nhân của Gấu, thì chỉ hai nhà thơ, sống thật đời của mình, không 1 vết nhơ, không khi nào phải “edit” cái phẩm hạnh của mình, là Brodsky và ông anh nhà thơ của GCC.
Chẳng thế mà Milosz rất thèm 1 cuộc đời như của Brodsky, hay nói như 1 người dân bình thường Nga, tớ rất thèm có 1 cuộc đời riêng tư như của Brodsky, như trong bài viết của Tolstaya cho thấy.
Bảnh như Osip Mandelstam mà cũng phải sống cuộc đời kép, trong thế giới khốn nạn đó. Để sống sót,  Mandelstam cũng đã từng phải làm thơ thổi Xì, như bà vợ ông kể lại, và khi những người quen xúi bà, đừng bao giờ nhắc tới nó, bà đã không làm như vậy:
Nadezhda Mandelstam recalled how her husband Osip Mandelstam had done what was necessary to survive:
To be sure, M. also, at the very last moment, did what was required of him and wrote a hymn of praise to Stalin, but the "Ode" did not achieve its purpose of saving his life. It is possible, though, that without it I should not have survived either. . . . By surviving I was able to save his poetry.... When we left Voronezh, M. asked Natasha to destroy the "Ode." Many people now advise me not to speak of it at all, as thou it had never existed. But I cannot agree to this, because the truth would then be incomplete: leading a double life was an absolute fact of our age and nobody was exempt. The only difference was that while others wrote their odes in their apartments and country villas and were rewarded for them, M wrote his with a rope around his neck. Akhmatova did the same, as they drew-the noose tighter around the neck of her son. Who can blame either her or M.
Roberta Reeder: Akhmatova, nhà thơ, nhà tiên tri
Trong khi lũ nhà văn nhà thơ Liên Xô làm thơ ca ngợi Xì và được bổng lộc, thì M làm thơ ca ngợi Xì với cái thòng lọng ở cổ, và bài thơ “Ode” đó cũng chẳng cứu được mạng của ông. Người ta xúi tôi, đừng nhắc tới nó, nhưng tôi nghĩ không được, vì như thế sự thực không đầy đủ: sống cuộc đời kép là sự thực tuyệt đối của thời chúng ta.
Tuyệt.
Chỉ có hai nhà thơ sống sự thực tuyệt đối của thời chúng ta, bằng cuộc đời “đơn” của họ, là Brodsky và TTT!
Etkind relates how this trial pitted two traditional foes against each other, the bureaucracy and the intelligentsia. Brodsky represented Russian poetry.
The lot had fallen on him by chance. There were many other talented at the time who might have been in his place. But once the lot fell him, he understood the responsibility of his position-he was no a private person but had become a symbol, the way Akhmatova been in 1946, when she was picked out of hundreds of possible poets punished, and became a national symbol of the Russian poet, as had become that day. It was hard for Brodsky-he had bad nerves, a bad heart. But he played his role in the trial impeccably, with dignity, without challenge, and with fervor, calmly, understanding by the way he answered he evoked deep respect not only from his friends but from those who once had been indifferent to him or even hostile.
Có nhiều nhà thơ có tài, có thể ở vào chỗ anh ta khi đó, Efim Etkind viết. Nhưng số phận đã chọn đúng anh ta, và ngay lập tức anh hiểu trách nhiệm về địa vị của anh - không còn là một con người riêng tư, nhưng trở thành một biểu tượng, như Akhmatova đã trở thành một biểu tượng quốc gia của người thi sĩ Nga, khi bà bị số phận lọc ra giữa hàng trăm nhà thơ, năm 1946. Thật quá nặng cho Brodsky. Ông có một bộ não tệ, một trái tim tệ. Nhưng ông đã đóng vai ông tại tòa án một cách tuyệt vời.
Cuốn “Akhmatova, thi sĩ, tiên tri”, trên 600 trang, khổ lớn, dành 1 chương cho Brodsky [Joseph Brodsky: Arrest and Exile, 1963-1965], kể lại chi tiết vụ án, và về “những đứa trẻ mồ côi của Akhmatova”, là đám nhà thơ trẻ trong có Brodsky.
 Án tòa đã được quyết định từ trước, 5 năm tù lưu đầy nội xứ, trong khi tất cả phiên tòa đều có ý nghĩ, sẽ là án treo.
Vụ án của Brodsky là thứ nhất, sau đó, tới những vụ khác, như vụ Daniel và Sinyasky, vụ Solzhenitsyn, Sakharov…  
GCC có tới ba, hoặc 4 cuốn, khổng lồ về Akhmatova, cuốn trên, "Chữ đuổi Thần Chết chạy có cờ", "Nửa thế kỷ Akhmatova..."  cuốn nào cũng thú vị hết, hà hà!
*


Dante
Chàng đếch thèm trở lại
Ngay cả sau khi mất
Thành phố Hà Lội của chàng
Rời bỏ, chàng đi thẳng một mách
Vì chàng mà tôi hát bài hát này
Đêm. Một bó đuốc. Nụ hôn sau cùng.
Bên ngoài, âm thanh số mệnh – Như gió hú
Từ Địa Ngục, chàng gửi cho nàng một lời trù ẻo.
Ở Thiên Đàng, nàng vẫn giữ chàng ở trong đầu
Chàng không bước chân trần, muộn trong đêm
Bị quyến rũ, như 1 tên tội đồ
Qua Hà Lội - phản bội, đầy hờn oán
Thành phố chàng chân thành ao ước.
Bài thơ trên, kỳ cục thay - tuyệt vời thay - làm liên tưởng tới nhà thơ tội đồ gốc Bắc Kít, trong bài thơ nhớ vợ; cũng cái giọng ngôi thứ nhất, cũng chỉ là riêng tư, mà trở thành “sử thi” của lũ Ngụy.
Bài thơ thần sầu nhất của Thơ Ở Đâu Xa: Bài Nhớ Thi Sĩ
Đâu có phải tự nhiên mà đám sĩ quan VNCH lại phổ thơ, và đi đường tụng ca, khi còn ở trong tù VC.
Mỗi ông thì đều có 1 bà vợ như vậy.
*
Văn xuôi Akhmatova: Nửa Thế Kỷ Của Tôi
Đọc loáng thoáng, vớ được giai thoại này, lạ làm sao, làm nhớ đến giai thoại, về Shostakovich, thời gian thất sủng, không dám ngủ ở trong nhà, mà ở hành lang, chờ KGB tới bắt, để vợ con khỏi phải nhìn thấy cảnh tượng này. Trên Điểm Sách London, số 1, Dec 2011 có 1 bài hay lắm về ông, đúng hơn, về cái thế đi hai hàng của ông. Để thủng thẳng TV giới thiệu độc giả, coi có giống đám sĩ phu Bắc Hà không (1)
In the mid-1920s attacks in the press against Akhmatova were crowned with success: Akhmatova was officially banned from publication. The resolution, however, was never made public or printed and Akhmatova learned of it only through an acquaintance:
After my readings in Moscow (Spring 1924) the resolution regarding the cessation of my literary activity was put into effect. I was no longer published in journals or almanacs, or invited to literary evenings. I met Marietta Shaginyan on Nevsky Prospect. She said:
"You're such an important person-the Central Committee passed a resolution about you-not to be arrested, but not to be published either."
Vào giữa thập niên 1920, những cuộc tấn công nhắm vào Akhmatova đạt đến đỉnh cao chói lọi của nó. Bà chính thức bị cấm in ấn bất cứ 1 cái gì. Nhưng đếch ai đọc được cái lệnh này, vì là lệnh miệng từ Bắc Bộ Phủ Cẩm Linh. Bà chỉ biết đến nó, qua 1 người quen. Bà bạn quen này nói:
Mi bảnh thật. Nhà nước bi giờ ra 1 nghị quyết Đảng về mi:
Cấm không được bắt. Cấm không được in bất cứ 1 cái gì từ con mụ này! (1)
Hà, hà!
In August 1936, Akhmatova devoted a poem to Dante, emphasizing as the archetypal poet in exile, playing the same role as Ovid did in Pushkin’s work. Like Akhmatova's Petersburg, Dante's Florence represents a way of life and thought. In his case it will be lost to him because he was exiled for his beliefs. The poem may also be an indirect allusion to Mandelstam, another poet in exile. Dante was forced to leave his beloved city in 1302 after the victory of the opposing party. Several years later he was offered the possibility of returning under condition of a humiliating public repentance, which he spurned. He refused to walk "with a lighted candle"-the ritual of repentance-even to be able to return to Florence. Unlike Lot's wife, he refused to look back.
Akhmatova: Thi sĩ, tiên tri
[Trong cuốn trên, có 1 bản dịch khác bài thơ "Dante"]
*


From Russia With Love           


Thơ Mỗi Ngày
GRIGORI DASHEVSKY
From "Ithaca"
The night approaches. Dusk drafts on buildings
their future ruins. Dusk deepens windows
and apertures. It hollows stones
with shadows like with water. It foretells
the near death of a hundred clouds
to the shining host. A thin layer of dust,
the seer leaves his footprints on the roofs
as he walks home from the future
not his own, swallowing his voice-
in its rays, fat blood flows down
the golden armor. Wet
blue entrails. Large heads
have rolled down the shoulders.
Speech has grown silent in deep mouths.
.............................................................
The signs of a life without past will emerge
like lies through the lines of an old page,
emptiness will turn into loss,
foreign sand into Ithaca.
Ithaca is the time
when there's nowhere to go. If it's night,
it means the night is the end of the voyage.
A sackcloth hiding the shoulders
of the stranger is truer than
speeches about past and future
he won't make. Nobody
will. On the streets rain readies
hollows for the funeral, already
overgrown with grass.
In a long puddle he sees:
a pauper, a random victim of the skies
hangs with his head down.
In height, he is a cloud, the size
of a lost faith
in returning home.
...........................................
So should I, a pauper sitting
by a stranger's door, declare: I'm Odysseus,
and I'm back. Should I say:
I'm recognized. After the mourning songs
tears are still rolling down my face. I have been
summoned to clothe the past
in the shining ice.
The twilight pushes a heavy box of reflection
out of the windows
and thumbs through a pale face
as if it were a stack of letters lying in a vacuum,
written by an unfamiliar hand.
You are in Ithaca, but you are not yet home
The soul goes home the way of flesh,
clothed in white rags,
so that to say
upon arrival: I recognize
and I am recognized. Window water,
vapor of window reflections
harden not in the shining of the ice
that has come out of a secret thought,
but from a permanent neighboring frame,
which has embraced life into its shores of death,
where my steps on the sand
are uneven and filled with water.
Old rags are stronger than old life.
Night, like dead water, sows together
the tattered contours of the past.
A stranger's death is a seed of your homeland,
sprouting from the graveyard statues,
from the clouds, forever still.
-Translated from the Russian by Valzhyna Mort
Poetry, Nov 2014

Áo xưa dù nhàu cũng xin bạc đầu gọi mãi tên nhau
TCS

Giẻ cũ, áo cũ, tã cũ, cờ cũ (a)... thì mạnh hơn là đời cũ
Đêm, như nước chết, cùng nhau gieo
những đường viền tơi tả của quá khứ
Cái chết của kẻ lạ thì là mầm hạt quê nhà của mi đó
Nẩy lên từ những pho tượng ở nghĩa trang
Từ những đám mây, vưỡn miên viễn, hoài hoài
Ở Xề Gòn
(a)
 
Ghi chú về Viết và Nước.
Notes on Writing and the Nation
[For Index on Censorship]
Salman Rushdie
The nation requires anthems, flags.
The poet offers discord. Rags
Nhà nước đòi Tiến Quân Ca. Cờ Máu.
Nhà thơ bèn chìa ra: Cứt. (1)
(1) Discord: Sự bất hòa. Không khứng giao lưu, hòa giải. Rag: Giẻ rách. Từ "cứt", là mượn của cả hai, NHT và nhà thơ Nguyễn Chí Thiện: Ông nhà thơ, thay vì làm thơ ca ngợi nhân ngày sinh nhật Bác, thì bèn đi ị.
Nhưng chưa thảm bằng trường hợp của chính nhà thơ Văn Cao.
Nhà nước đòi quốc ca, ông OK, nhưng nhà nước lại biểu, đi giết người đã, rồi sau đó, làm TQC, vưỡn còn kịp!
*
Con chim ousen [chim két] hót ở trong rừng Cilgwri.
Hót hoài hót hoài như một dòng suối dội lên những hòn đá rêu xanh
Nhưng cũng chưa xa xưa bằng con nhái Cors Fochno
Cảm thấy làn da lạnh chũng vào tới tận xương tận tuỷ.
Rushdie viết, rất ít nhà thơ kết hôn sâu xa đằm thắm với đất mẹ như nhà thơ R.S. Thomas, một nhà thơ dân tộc Welsh [a Welsh nationalist], những vần thơ của ông tìm kiếm, bằng cách nhận ra, để ý [noticing], khẳng định [arguing], làm thành vần điệu, huyền hoặc hóa, biến đất nước thành một sinh vật rất ư là nồng nàn, rất ư là trữ tình.
Tuy nhiên, cũng chính ông này, cũng viết:
Sự hận thù mất nhiều thời gian
Để mà đâm chồi nẩy lộc, và lòng hận thù của tôi
Kể từ khi sinh ra, cứ thế mà tăng trưởng..
Không phải tôi thù cái mảnh đất tàn nhẫn thô bạo dã man mà tôi ra đời...
Tôi nhận ra một điều:
Cái lòng hận thù đó, là thù cái làn da khốn kiếp của tôi,
Cái thứ khốn kiếp, là chính tôi!
Hate takes a long time
To grow in, and mine
Has increased from birth;
Not for the brute earth...
I find
This hate's for my own kind.
*
Thảo nào, thằng cha Gấu thù chính nó, thù cái chất Yankee mũi tẹt của chính nó!


*
Bosnia Tune
As you sip your brand of scotch,
crush a roach, or scratch your crotch,
as your hand adjusts your tie,
people die.
In the towns with funny names,
hit by bullets, caught in flames,
by and large not knowing why,
people die.
In small places you don't know
of, yet big for having no
chance to scream or say goodbye,
people die.
People die as you elect
brand-new dudes who preach neglect,
self-restraint, etc.-whereby
people die.
Too far off to practice love
for thy neighbor/brother Slav,
where your cherubs dread to fly,
people die.
While the statues disagree,
Cain's version, history
for its fuel tends to buy
those who die.
As you watch the athletes score,
check your latest statement, or
sing your child a lullaby,
people die.
Time, whose sharp bloodthirsty quill
parts the killed from those who kill,
will pronounce the latter band
as your brand.
                [1992]
Joseph Brodsky: Collected Poems in English
LMH by PTH
Note: Bài phỏng vấn này, từ năm 2004, thú thực, GCC không nhớ, có đọc hay là không, hà, hà!
Post lại trên TV, từ FB của LMH, và lèm bèm sau. Tuy nhiên, trong bài viết về Brodsky, ký giả Mẽo, David Remnick, có nêu ra trường hợp này rồi, về cái sự in tác phẩm xb ở hải ngoại ở trong nước.
Ông cho biết, Brodsky rất mừng khi nghe tin tác phẩm của ông được trong nước cho in. 
Remnick thì coi đây là cú trả lại khổ chủ những món đồ bị nhà nước ăn cắp.
Và cũng nhắc thêm trường hợp chẳng tự nhiên gì, liên quan đến Võ Phiến vs Fils, hiện đang ì xèo trên mạng.
Cũng nhắc thêm" giai thoại" này, không nhớ GCC đọc ở đâu, Brodsky, khi ra tù, lần đầu tiên nhìn thấy tác phẩm của ông, được hải ngoại thâu gom, in, khi ông ở tù, bực lắm, tao đâu có biết cú này, tụi nó, lũ bộ lạc Cờ Lăng, chôm, in tác phẩm của ta, hà, hà!
            Khoảng năm 1988, do sinh kế, gia đình tôi mở ngay một sạp báo trước ngõ. Chủ nhân đích thực, ông cán bộ nhà kế bên. Như một cách giữ chỗ, trước khi về hưu, và cũng muốn giúp đỡ gia đình nguỵ. Cư xá tôi ở vốn thuộc nhà nước cũ, đa số là công chức có nghề chuyên môn được nhà nước "cách mạng" cho lưu dụng, sau ba ngày cải tạo tại chỗ.
Đó là những chuyện ngay sau ngày 30/4/75.
Thời điểm 1988-89 đã có chủ trương "cởi trói" cho những văn sĩ. Có thể nhờ vậy, văn chương, văn nghệ sĩ nguỵ được "ăn theo". Một số sách trước 1975, nay thấy tái bản, dưới một tên khác. Do biết ngoại ngữ, tôi được một người quen làm nghề xuất mướn dịch một số tác phẩm, như của nhà văn y sĩ người Anh, Cronin. Rồi một người quen, trước 75 cũng có viết lách, nay làm nghề sửa mo-rát cho nhà xuất bản nhà nước, cho biết, ông chủ của anh muốn tái bản, tác phẩm Hemingway, Mặt Trời Vẫn Mọc do tôi dịch. Tới gặp, ông cho biết cần phải sửa. Thứ nhất, bản dịch của tôi sử dụng quá nhiều tiếng địa phương, thí dụ như "bồ tèo", "xập xệ"... Thứ hai, có nhiều chỗ dịch sai. Tôi về nhà coi lại, quả đúng như thế thật.
Trước 1975, sách dịch chạy theo nhu cầu thương mại. Cứ thấy một tác giả ngoại quốc ăn khách, vừa được Nobel... là đua nhau dịch. Hồi đó, tôi làm cho nhà xuất bản Vàng Son của ông Nhàn, số 32 Nguyễn Bỉnh Khiêm, nhà in của linh mục Cao Văn Luận. Một chi nhánh của nhà xuất bản Sống Mới. Trước đó, tôi đã dịch một cuốn về cuộc đổ bộ Normandie, nhưng do cuốn phim Ngày Dài Nhất đang ăn khách, ông Nhàn cho đổi tên cuốn sách, không ngờ lại trùng với bản dịch Ngày Dài Nhất của một nhà xuất bản khác. Thế là mạnh ai dịch. Dịch hối hả, dịch chối chết, mong sao ra trước kẻ địch!
Cuốn Mặt Trời Vẫn Mọc cũng gặp tình trạng tương tự. Hemingway đang ăn khách. Huỳnh Phan Anh, ông bạn tôi "chớp" Chuông Gọi Hồn Ai. Tôi vớ "thế hệ bỏ đi", tuy rằng Mặt Trời Vẫn Mọc! Ngồi ngay tại nhà in, dịch tới đâu thợ sắp chữ lấy tới đó.
Đọc lại, ngượng chín người. Thí dụ như câu: cuối năm thứ nhì (của cuộc hôn nhân): at the end of the second year, tôi đọc ra sao thành: cuối cuộc đệ nhị chiến, at the end of the second war!
Sau đó, tôi làm việc với nhà xb, sửa lại bản dịch, dưới sự "kiểm tra" của Nhật Tuấn, ông em Nhật Tiến. Thời gian này, tôi quen thêm Đỗ Trung Quân, nhân viên chạy việc cho nhà xuất bản nọ. Rồi qua anh, qua việc bán sách báo, qua việc dịch thuật... tôi quen thêm một số anh em trẻ lúc đó viết cho tờ Tuổi Trẻ, như Nguyễn Đông Thức, Đoàn Thạch Biền. Họ đều biết tôi, từ trước 75. Đoàn Thạch Biền trước 75 đã viết cho Văn qua tên Nguyễn Thanh Trịnh.
Tôi không còn nhớ rõ, ai trong số họ, đề nghị tôi viết mục đọc sách cho Tuổi Trẻ. Bài đầu tiên, là về cuốn Thám Tử Buồn, một truyện dịch của một tác giả Nga. Thảm cảnh của nước Nga sau đổi mới. Băng hoại tinh thần và đạo đức đưa đến tội ác. Trong đó có những cảnh như là con cháu đưa bố mẹ tới mộ, chưa kịp hạ huyệt, xác bố mẹ còn bỏ trơ đó, đã vội vàng về nhà tranh đoạt "gia tài của mẹ". Bố mẹ trẻ bỏ nhà đi du hí, đứa con bị chết đói, khi khám phá thấy miệng đứa bé còn cả một con dán chưa kịp nuốt thay cho sữa! Cuốn tiếp theo, là Ngôi Nhà Của Những Hồn Ma, của Isabel Allende.
Bài điểm cuốn này cho tôi những kỷ niệm thật thú vị.
Đó là lần đầu tiên tôi đọc Isabel Allende, nhưng "sư phụ" của bà, tôi quá rành. Có thể nói, cả hai chúng tôi đều học chung một thầy, là William Faulkner. Do đó, được điểm cuốn Ngôi Nhà là một hạnh phúc đối với tôi.
Nó là từ "Asalom, Asalom!" của Faulkner mà ra. Có tất cả mấy tầng địa ngục của Faulkner ở trong đó, cộng thêm địa ngục "giai cấp đấu tranh": ông con trai, con hoang, vô sản, "mần thịt" đứa chị/em gái dòng chính thống, con địa chủ. Địa chủ, ông bố cô gái, chính là ông bố của tên cách mạng vô sản!
Có những câu điểm sách mà tôi còn nhớ đến tận bi giờ: Những trang sách nóng bỏng trên tay, run lên bần bật, vì tình yêu và hận thù!
 Sau khi bài điểm sách được đăng, tôi được một anh bạn làm chủ một sạp báo cho biết, mấy người khách quen của anh đổ xô đi tìm tờ báo có đăng bài của Nguyễn Quốc Trụ! Lúc này, nhờ "cởi trói" nên được xài lại cái tên phản động đồi trụy này rồi!
Chưa hết. Sáng bữa đó, tới văn phòng phía Nam của nhà xb Văn Học, trình diện ông nhà văn cách mạng Nhật Tuấn.  Ông chủ của ông chủ, tức Hoàng Lại Giang, chủ nhà xb, vừa thấy mặt, bèn kêu cô kế toán lên trình diện,  ra lệnh, phát cho tên ngụy này liền một tí tiền, coi như tiền nhuận bút bài viết cho cuốn sách Ngôi Nhà Của Hồn Ma.
Ông biểu thằng Ngụy, bài hay thiệt. Chính vì vậy mà có bài điểm cuốn thứ ba. Cuốn này là Gấu được ông chủ "order"!
 Cuốn này đụng!
Trong bài viết,  khi đọc lại trên báo, Gấu thấy có từ "nguỵ".
 Thật tình mà nói, không biết biết do tôi viết, hay đã bị sửa. Có thể do tôi. Bởi vì, vào thời điểm lúc đó, "Nguỵ" là một từ đám chúng tôi rất ưa dùng, có khi còn hãnh diện khi nhắc tới, nếu may mắn được ngồi chung với dăm ba quan cách mạng. Nhưng một khi xuất hiện trong một bài viết, nhất là về một tác giả như  Hoàng Lại Giang, vấn đề lại khác hẳn. Tôi nghỉ viết cho Tuổi Trẻ sau bài đó.
 Một bữa đang đứng bán báo, Đ. ghé vô. Anh là bạn Huỳnh Phan Anh, trước 75 làm giáo sư. Sau cộng tác với tờ Tuổi Trẻ. Nói chuyện vài câu, anh đưa tôi một mớ tiền.  Hỏi, tiền gì? Trả lời, tiền nhuận bút đưa trước. Hỏi viết báo nào? Anh mỉm cười: viết báo hải ngoại!
 Hóa ra là, lúc đó có chủ trương làm báo hải ngoại, từ trong nước, do mấy quan cách mạng cầm chịch. Bài viết, theo Đ., tha hồ "đập" nhà nước, y chang báo hải ngoại, kẻ thù cách mạng, chắc vậy!
 Đúng vào thời gian này, một khách hàng quen của sạp báo, nhờ tôi kiếm dùm bản dịch tiếng Pháp Tội ác và Trừng Phạt của Dostoevsky. Có rồi, như để trả ơn, anh úp úp mở mở chìa cho tôi xem một tờ báo Time, đã được ngụy trang bằng một cái vỏ bọc, là trang bìa tờ Đại Đoàn Kết. Tôi hỏi mượn, anh gật đầu. Trong số báo đó, có một bài essay nhan đề: Sách, những đứa con của trí tưởng (Books, children of the mind).
 Bài trên Time, là nhân vụ cháy một thư viện nổi tiếng ở Nga, hình như là thư viện St. Petersburg. Sự thiệt hại, theo như tác giả bài báo, là không thể tưởng tượng, và "không thể tha thứ" được. Ông tự hỏi tại sao lại xẩy ra một chuyện "quái  đản" như vậy? Rồi ông tự giải thích, cái nước Nga nó vốn vậy, và chỉ ở đó mới có những chuyện quái đản như thế xẩy ra. Ông dẫn chứng: Thời gian thành phố St. Petersburg bị quân đội Quốc Xã Đức vây hãm 900 ngày, dài nhất trong lịch sử hiện đại; trong khi nhân dân thành phố lả vì lạnh và vì đói, tiếng thơ Puskhin vẫn ngân lên qua đài phát thanh thành phố, cho cả nước Nga cùng nghe. Nhưng theo ông, cũng chính nước Nga là xứ sở đầu tiên đưa ra lệnh kiểm duyệt báo chí, và đưa văn nghệ sĩ đi đầy ở Sibérie... Ông còn dẫn chứng nhiều nữa. Trong khi đọc bài báo, lén lút, những khi vắng khách hàng, nhìn những cuốn sách đang được bầy bán trên sạp tôi chợt nhận ra một sự thực: chúng đều mới tái sinh, từ đống tro than là cuộc phần thư năm 1975. Cuốn Khách Lạ Ở Thiên Đường, của Cronin, do Gấu tui mới dịch, đang nằm kia, vốn đã được dịch. Nhiều cuốn khác nữa, chúng đang mỉm cười nhìn tôi: Hà, tưởng gì. chúng mình lại gặp nhau!
 Tôi mượn tác giả tên bài viết, viết về nỗi vui tái ngộ, về cuộc huỷ diệt sách trước đó. Về những đứa con của trí tưởng, có khi cần được tẩy rửa, bằng "lửa". Tuy đau xót, nhưng đôi khi thật cần thiết. Tiện đà, tôi viết về những tác giả đang nổi tiếng, và tiên đoán một cuộc phần thư thứ nhì sẽ xẩy ra, do chính họ, tự nguyện, nếu muốn lịch sử văn học Việt Nam lại có một cuộc tái sinh!
 Đ. nhận bài, hí hửng mang về. Hai ba ngày sau, anh quay lại, trả bài viết, nói, không được! Nhưng thôi, tiền tạm ứng biếu anh! Hỏi, anh cho biết: ông chủ nhiệm của tờ báo hải ngoại, sau khi đọc bài viết, đi gặp thủ trưởng, yêu cầu: nếu cho đăng những bài như thế này, cho dù là ở hải ngoại, phải cấp cho ông một tờ giấy chứng nhận, "nhà nước" đã cho phép ông làm, qua cương vị chủ bút. Nếu không sau này, cả ông lẫn người viết đều đi tù!
 Lệnh "miệng' thì được, bố ai dám thò tay ký một văn bản "chết người" như vậy!
Đoàn Thạch Biền nghe kể chuyện, chạy tới: để tôi, in trên tờ báo có mục anh phụ trách, hình như tờ Công Luận, ở ngay phía đối diện Bưu Điện, khu có quán cà-phê đám văn nghệ sĩ thường la cà. Nhưng rồi cũng lại lắc đầu, không được! Người viết thử lại một lần nữa, đem đến cho tờ Kiến Thức Ngày Nay. Tuần sau trở lại, gặp một anh thư ký trẻ măng, kính cận dầy cộm. Anh nhìn, ngạc nhiên ra mặt: ông là ai sao tôi chưa từng biết, chưa từng nghe qua? Anh cho biết, lệ thường, bài được đánh máy hai bản, một để làm tài liệu, một đưa đi sắp chữ. Bài của ông, chúng tôi phải đánh máy ba bản, một đưa qua mấy anh bên Hội Văn Nghệ Thành Phố, để các anh duyệt, nếu cần, xin ý kiến thành uỷ! Các anh cho biết, cho đăng, nhưng phải sửa rất nhiều đoạn!
 Tôi xin lại bài viết.
 Bài viết, sau đó, nằm trong tay một người viết thuộc ban chủ trương tờ Tuổi Trẻ lúc đó. Anh nói: tôi giữ lại đây, hy vọng sau này có dịp đăng. Như một cách giúp đỡ: vì anh có sạp báo, tôi đề nghị mỗi tuần anh điểm hết mấy cuốn sách mới xuất bản, theo kiểu tóm tắt nội dung, không cần phê bình, toà báo sẽ trả nhuận bút, theo giá biểu những cuốn sách. Nhưng liền sau đó, tôi gặp lại một người bạn, và qua anh, gia đình chúng tôi đã thực hiện chuyến đi dài, chạy trốn quê hương.
 Viết lại chuyện trên, tôi bỗng nhớ những ngày làm việc tại nhà xb nọ. Tôi đã gặp ở đó, một số văn nghệ sĩ Miền Bắc. Ngoài Nhật Tuấn, Hoàng Lại Giang, những người khác đều không biết tôi, và tôi cũng chẳng biết họ. Nghĩa là hai bên chẳng có chuyện gì để nói. Tôi vẫn còn nhớ thái độ thân thiện, cởi mở của những người tôi đã từng trò chuyện, tôi vẫn còn nhớ những khuôn mặt trong sáng đầy tin tưởng của những người bạn trẻ như Đoàn Thạch Biền, Đỗ Trung Quân, và nhất là dáng ân cần khi đưa ra đề nghị cộng tác, của anh phụ trách tờ Tuổi Trẻ (hình như tên Thức, không phải Nguyễn Đông Thức. Đó là thời gian còn Kim Hạnh)...
 Những người viết Miền Nam trước 1975, ở lại, hình như đều viết trở lại. Tôi có lẽ là người đầu tiên được nhà xuất bản Văn Học đề nghị tái bản bản dịch Mặt Trời Vẫn Mọc.
 Tôi nhớ lại chuyện trên, nhân  Sông Côn Mùa Lũ, của Nguyễn Mộng Giác, một tác giả hải ngoại, được "tái bản" ở trong nước.
 Trong bài viết Perfect Pitch,  ký giả David Remnick kể lại lần ông gặp Joseph Brodsky, vào năm 1987, hai tuần lễ sau khi nhà thơ được giải Nobel văn chương. Cuộc gặp gỡ diễn ra tại căn nhà hầm (basement apartment), phố Morton Street, trong khu  Greenwich Village, New York. Đó là thời điểm bắt đầu chính sách glasnost. Thơ của ông được xuất bản ở trong nước, lần đầu tiên, sau hơn hai thập kỷ. "Ông không thèm giấu diếm, dù chỉ một tí, niềm vui của mình, về chuyện này", nhà báo Remnick viết. Và nhà báo giải thích về niềm vui của nhà thơ: Đối với một chính quyền đã cho xuất bản tác phẩm của ông, và của những nhà văn nhà thơ "bị biếm"  khác, điều này có nghĩa: trả lại của cải bị ăn trộm, cho chủ nhân. Và David Remnick cho rằng: đâu cần phải biết ơn kẻ trộm!
Có người tự hỏi về ý nghĩa một bộ sách như Sông Côn Mùa Lũ, bầy bên cạnh Lênin tuyển tập, Nhật Ký Trong Tù...., ở đây theo tôi, nếu có sự thất thế, tủi nhục, thì phần lớn là thuộc về kẻ ăn trộm chứ không phải người bị mất trộm!
 Đâu cần phải biết ơn kẻ trộm.

Note: Bài viết này, viết lâu rồi, nay nhân mấy sự kiện nóng hổi, bèn lôi ra, để lèm bèm thêm, về cái sự thất thế, được, mất, tự nhiên... khi được VC in sách, chấp nhận...
Cũng viết thêm, những sự kiện trong bài viết, trên, đều thực cả, GCC chẳng bịa ra 1 chuyện gì hết.
Nhân đây, cám ơn tất cả bạn bè ở trong nước được nhắc tới trong bài viết.
Best wishes to all.
Take Care
Happy New Year
I Miss All Of U & SAIGON
NQT
Brodsky by Tolstaya
Trong bài viết này, Tolstaya có kể về 1 lần trở lại Nga, tới 1 diễn đàn của đám Trẻ, chắc cũng giống như … LMH tham dự buổi nói chuyện với Hà Nội, về Phố vẫn Gió, và bà [Tolstaya] quá sợ hãi, vì cái sự tiếp đón bà, nhưng sau đó, bà hiểu, Moscow dành cho bà sự đón tiếp…  Brodsky, vì bà là... Brodsky với họ, và bởi là vì, bà đã từng gặp Brodsky.
Thú nhất là Tolstaya kể lại lần “tản mạn bên ly cà phê với nhà thơ”, cà phê không có đường, và cả Moscow bực quá, la lên, tại sao lũ Mẽo lại đối xừ tàn tệ với nhà thơ của chúng ta như thế, cả nước Mẽo tư bản mà không có cục đường cho Brodsky của "chúng ông" ư?
Hà, hà!
Y. Rein, là bạn của Brodsky và cũng là một nhà thơ lớn, đã từng tuyên bố tại Moscow: Nước Mỹ hãy nhớ lấy lời này. Brodsky là một tiếng nói Nga lớn lao nhất của thời đại anh ta. Anh ta đến từ một thời đại tiếp theo những trại tù, những cấm ngăn, một thời đại tự nuôi nó bằng văn chương trong khi chẳng còn chi, nếu có chăng, chỉ là trống rỗng. Và anh luôn luôn là số một của chúng tôi.
I met him in 1988 during a short trip to the United States, and when 1 got back to Moscow 1 was immediately invited to an evening devoted to Brodsky. An old friend read his poetry, then there was a performance of some music that was dedicated to him. It was almost impossible to get close to the concert hall, passersby were grabbed and begged to sell "just one extra ticket." The hall was guarded by mounted police-you might have thought that a rock concert was in the offing. To my utter horror, I suddenly realized that they were counting on me: I was the first person they knew who had seen the poet after so many years of exile. What could I say? What can you say about a man with whom you've spent a mere two hours? I resisted, but they pushed me onto the stage. I felt like a complete idiot. Yes, I had seen Brodsky. Yes, alive. He's sick. He smokes. We drank coffee. There was no sugar in the house. (The audience grew agitated: are the Americans neglecting our poet? Why didn't he have any sugar?) Well, what else? Well, Baryshnikov dropped by, brought some firewood, they lit a fire. (More agitation in the hall: is our poet freezing to death over there?) What floor does he live on? What does he eat? What is he writing? Does he write by hand or use a typewriter? What books does he have? Does he know that we love him? Will he come? Will he come? Will he come?
He had an extraordinary tenderness for all his Petersburg friends, generously extolling their virtues, some of which they did not possess. When it came to human loyalty, you couldn't trust his assessments-everyone was a genius, a Mozart, one of the best poets of the twentieth century. Quite in keeping with the Russian tradition, for him a human bond was higher than Justice, and love higher than truth. Young writers and poets from Russia inundated him with their manuscripts-whenever I would leave Moscow for the United States my poetic acquaintances would bring their collections and stick them in my suitcase: "It isn't very heavy. The main thing is, show it to Brodsky. Just ask him to read it. I don't need anything else- just let him read it!" And he read and remembered, and told people that [he poems were good, and gave interviews praising the fortunate, and they kept sending their publications. And their heads turned; some said things like: "Really, there are two genuine poets in Russia: Brodsky and myself." He created the false impression of a kind of old patriarch - but if only a certain young writer whom I won't name could have heard how Brodsky groaned and moaned after obediently reading a story whose plot was built around delight in moral sordidness. "Well, all right, I realize that after this one can continue writing. But how can he go on living?"
    He didn't go to Russia. But Russia came to him. Everyone came to convince themselves that he really and truly existed, that he was alive and writing-this strange Russian poet who did not want to set foot on Russian soil. He was published in Russian in newspapers, magazines, single volumes, multiple volumes; he was quoted, referred to, studied, and published as he wished and as he didn't; he was picked apart, used, and turned into a myth. Once a poll was held on a Moscow street: "What are your hopes for the future in connection with the parliamentary elections?" A carpenter answered: "I could care less about the Parliament and politics. I just want to live a private life, like Brodsky."
Ông không tới với nước Nga, nhưng nước Nga đến với ông. Nhà thơ Nga kỳ cục không muốn bám rễ vào đất Nga.
Kỳ cục thật, bởi vì đã từ lâu, thế hệ lạc loài được Hemingway mô tả trong Mặt Trời Vẫn Mọc, The Sun Also Rises vẫn luôn luôn là một ám ảnh đối với những kẻ bị bứng ra khỏi đất. Nếu không trở nên điên điên, khùng khùng thì cũng bị thương tật, (bất lực như nhân vật chính trong Mặt Trời Vẫn Mọc), bị bệnh kín (La Mort dans l'Âme: Chết trong Tâm hồn), và chỉ là những kẻ thất bại. Đám Cộng sản trong nước chẳng vẫn thường dè bỉu một nền văn chương hải ngoại?
 Nhưng Brodsky là một ngoại lệ. Nước Nga đã đến với ông. Thơ ông được xuất bản, đăng tải trên hầu hết các báo chí tại Nga. Trong một cuộc thăm dò dư luận tại đường phố Moscow: "Ông có mong ước, hy vọng gì liên quan đến cuộc bầu cử?", một người thợ mộc đã trả lời: "Tôi chỉ mong sống một cuộc đời riêng tư. Như Joseph Brodsky".

Ai cho phép mi là thi sĩ?


Hai tên Do Thái, Two Jews


AN INVOLUNTARY exile, Joseph was a kosmopolit, more avid for world culture than he was curious about Christianity. The Jew- as-writer, it seems to me, is committed to language as such, to the living language. He does not write for the future, even if his writing is "ahead of its time". Nor does he write out of reverence for the past: past and future can take care of themselves. Joseph, of course, was engaged in something else as well, making the two languages more equal, adding, subtracting, but above all mixing. Even before he became a wanderer, Joseph was a transgressor. As a translator, in the wider sense, he crossed and recrossed frontiers. "All poets are Yids", said Tsvetayeva.
     Joseph dispensed with the supposed privileges of victimhood. Jewishness, inescapably identified with persecution, was not likely to appeal to him. He made light of exile, stressing the gains both material and spiritual or intellectual, minimizing the losses. He was clearly scornful of those intellectuals who gathered periodically to discuss such issues, insisting that while the delegates talked, under the auspices of this or that foundation, others were suffering on a scale and to a degree that rendered their complaints laughable, even contemptible. He was not a whiner, and he was quite intolerant of the pervasive "culture of complaint". Naturally, this did nothing for his popularity among fellow exiles. In short, if he made a career, he did not actively make it out of the sufferings he had endured as a Jew or as the victim of a regime that still had totalitarian aspirations.


Là 1 tên lưu vong miễn cưỡng - bị VC Liên Xô tống xuất, như cas của Điếu Cày, thí dụ, tao phải kiện lũ VC - Joseph [Brodsky] là "người của bốn phương", thèm khát văn hóa thế giới hơn là tò mò về Ky Tô Giáo. Là 1 tên nhà văn Do Thái đối với tôi, là xuống thuyền., dấn thân... với ngôn ngữ, như thế, tức là với ngôn ngữ đang còn sống. Ông không viết cho tương lai, ngay cả khi ông phán, viết "trước thời của nó". Ông cũng đếch viết để dựng dậy cái xác chết là quá khứ [Ngụy, thí dụ, như tên GCC]. Quá khứ với tương lai, chúng tự lo cho chúng, đếch cần đến tớ.
Lẽ dĩ nhiên, Joseph vướng mắc với 1 cái gì khác....


"WHEN YOU SPEAK, cherish the thought of the secret of the voice and the word, and speak in fear and love, and remember that the world of the word finds utterance through your mouth. Then you will lift the word." This is from Martin Buber's Ten Rungs, Collected Hasidic Sayings (I947), a section entitled, "Of The Power Of The Word". Later, in "How To Say Torah", the compiler warns: "You must cease to be aware of yourselves. You must be nothing but an ear that hears what the universe of the word is constantly saying within you. The moment you start hearing what you yourself are saying, you must stop." And further: "[The proud] are reborn as bees ... that hum and buzz: 'I am, I am, I am.'"
    If Joseph did not allude directly to "the word of God", did not set his devotion to language in a specifically Judaeo-Christian context, it was perhaps because he felt that "the twentieth century has exhausted the possibilities for salvation and come into conflict with the New Testament." "Christ is not enough, Freud is not enough, Marx is not enough, nor is existentialism or Buddha." He concludes, in a kind of last ditch appeal to the power of the Word: "All of these are only means of justifying the holocaust, not of averting it. To avert it, mankind has nothing except the Ten Commandments, like it or not." Such statements seem to contain little or nothing of Christian charity or belief in redemption, but a great deal of misanthropy and Old Testament fatalism. Only the Word, specifically the words of the Ten Commandment, stand between us and the triumph of Evil. At the time, I thought this rather simplistic. But there was also something quite empowering about it. It is not so much that the Word saves, as that language is identified as the arena of contention or engagement. Joseph acknowledged this when he gave up the various consolations on offer. However different the timbre of his voice, he was after all- I came to this only lately – of that company I had so admired in my early days with MPT. It reminded me of what Ted Hughes, in his Introduction to Vask Popa's Collected Poems (1978), had written of this generation "They have got back to the simple animal courage of accepting the odds." If you accept the odds, you do not obliterate them, but paradoxically you do take control. Joseph was never one to surrender control.
Let me try something! He was not meek in his fatalism, his resignation. Rather, he was fierce, even angry. Like a moralist. But this anger, which sometimes showed itself in his encounters with the press or others, was not manifest in his writing, in that which was destined to remain. Language, as written down, demanded more of him. A certain ceremony or decorousness was required. But he did not, as I sometimes supposed, hide behind it. He just paid his dues to language and earned the right to import more and more of the whole man. This apprenticeship
was an intensely moral affair, a training in morality, in ethics as well, morality being engagement but with the ego under control, providing the charge of energy but not dominating the proceedings. Come to think of it, wasn't Joseph a Protestant rather than a Catholic? A Calvinist actually.
I am not being captious, merely speculating about Joseph's approach to the business of writing. His vision of the self was a useful one. Perhaps, after all, I was misled when, in the early seventies, I conjectured that "His refusal to play any part other than himself should protect him against blandishments in the West, as he was, in a sense, protected against pressures of conformism in the Soviet Union by the refusal of the orthodox literary establishment to acknowledge his artistic existence." The second part of that statement is, in any case, tautologous. And the trouble with the rest of it is that I was probably fearing
the worst, that he would end up wholly owned by the media, typecast as America's tragic resident exile. But at the same time, knowing him, having sensed, even experienced the strength of his resolve, I also hoped that he would be able to preserve his integrity, even if I presumptuously couched this hope in paradoxical, skeptical, or political terms, when I talked of his not playing a part. It would have been wiser to have stated the obvious: that it was being himself, answerable to none except his great predecessors and finally God or Language, that got him into trouble in the first place. But at least that, if he were successful from a worldly point of view, as seemed likely, it would be largely on his own terms.
    Obviously his insistence on the primacy of language and his own subordinate rôle, helped him to combat pride. He kept reiterating, almost like a mantra, that the biography of a poet has to do not with the life he has lived but with his words.
    On the one hand, this smacks of a certain counter-elitist elitism, a romantic "not myself but the force within me"; on the other, it is simply foolish to claim for oneself what properly belongs to language, since one is the latter's servant or, more precisely, its artisan. If Joseph was a pedagogue as well- and he certainly was - it was not out of some exaggerated notion of his own importance. But, as I have said, there was no false modesty either. He could be the most natural of men. For instance, in response to the question posed by Bella Yezerskaya, mentioned earlier: "Do you consider yourself an innovator?" he replied: "No, I don't think so. Innovation is, in any case a silly concept. My rhymes sometimes turn out to be quite good, but to consider them 'new' is senseless; they're taken from the language in which they have always existed". Which is, of course, literally true. Nevertheless, more than a little satisfaction is expressed also by the modest "quite good"!

Nếu Joseph [HV] né “lời của Chúa”, có lẽ là vì anh cảm thấy “thế kỷ 20 mệt nhoài, kiệt quệ những khả hữu cứu chuộc, và đụng độ với Tân Ước”. Chúa Ky Tô không đủ, Freud đếch đủ, Marx đếch đủ [đừng đọc giọng Trung Kít nhe!], hiện sinh không, và Phật cũng không…. Tất cả chỉ là những phương tiện để minh chứng, xác minh, chứng thực… Lò Thiêu, không phải để tránh nó. Để tránh nó, chỉ có “10 điều giáo lệnh”, thích hay không thích. Chỉ có Lời – 10 điều- giữa chúng ta và sự chiến thắng của Cái Ác Bắc Kít!
Hà, hà!
From Russia With Love           
Brodsky Remembered
YESTERDAY I received a card with details of the memorial service for Joseph, to take place in New York City, in the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, on 8th March. I try to let myself feel what I am feeling. But I am cautious too. After a month, I still do not think of him as dead. That is, I do, but only when I oblige myself to imagine him among the other dead. Family members, a friend or two.
    Yesterday, walking to the office, I overheard myself actually asking Joseph what he thought of all this, that is, my writing about him, us, his poetry, the translation thereof. I particularly wanted to discuss the latter with him, and it seemed to me - in my folly, arrogance or optimism - that I ought to be able to construct an ersatz Joseph. Not so! Besides, this ersatz Joseph would have been at a loss anyway, although he, the real Joseph, rarely was? At the same time, he is apologizing - that's to say I am, on his behalf, in this impersonation or entertainment. Apologizing for the public nature of his role, for setting himself up as the defender of culture, tradition, including (not least) that of formal verse. As for myself, whatever culture I somehow embody (by default, it often seems to me) is inaccessible. The Classical legacy leaves me cold, even if (because?) my father was a Classicist ...
The Cathedral of St. John the Divine, 112th and Amsterdam, New York City, \
Friday, March 8, 1996, 5.00 p.m.
    Lucas Myers, one of my oldest friends, from Cambridge days, lived at ro6th and Amsterdam. It was with him that I used to stay.
    Fall 1972 was the first of my early visits to the city. I had flown from London, via Chicago, directly to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, bypassing New York. So, I now approached New York from the West, rather than from the East, as I'd always expected I would. And not just expected. Despite my British background, I had written "nostalgic" poems about New York, had even cornily dreamt I was an immigrant from Eastern Europe sailing past the Statue of Liberty.
    Anyway, Lucas threw a party for me. Did Joseph come? Luke thinks not, and yet I picture him (Luke) straight-backed, hands by his side, chin well tucked in, peering at Joseph: the Tennessee aristocrat and the gingery Russian Jew. Well, Joseph certainly came to Luke's cosy apartment, and probably more than once, because he remembered the cat Perdita. He would murmur her name tenderly. Perdita was a large cat, also ginger, with a sagging undercarriage and a pretty face. I can see Joseph scratching her head ... and murmuring: "Purr ... Purr ... Deetah".
Joseph didn't want people to fuss over him and he'd no use for self-pity. But am I fussing? You can't actually fuss over the dead. Although there is, perhaps, an element of retrospective fussing, insofar as they then seem not quite so dead. As for self-pity, or rather the absence of it, this made a clean break possible. There was nothing death could hold over his head. He was not intimidated by it. His life, more than most lives, was a preparation for it. He was familiar with it, which is not to say he was a thanatologist. There was nothing actually morbid about his dialogue with death. Sometimes it was almost breezy.
Note: Buổi tưởng niệm Brodsky, được nhắc tới ở đây, Tin Văn có nhắc tới, khi trích dẫn bài tưởng niệm ông, trên tờ Người Nữu Ước:
Thứ Sáu, ngày 8 tháng 3 năm 1996, vào lúc 5 giờ chiều, buổi tưởng niệm thi sĩ Joseph Brodsky (tháng Năm 24, 1940 - tháng Giêng 28, 1996), Nobel văn chương 1987, tại nhà thờ St. John the Divine, New York, có lẽ đã đúng như ý nguyện của ông. Thay vì cuộc sống vị kỷ, những người bạn của ông đã nhắc nhở nhau về những chu toàn, the achievements, ngôn ngữ - the language - của người quá cố:
Death will come and will find a body
whose silent peace will reflect death's approach
like any woman's face
[Tĩnh vật, trong Phần Lời, Part of Speech]
 (Chết sẽ tới và sẽ thấy một xác thân
mà sự bình an lặng lẽ sẽ phản chiếu cái chết tới gần
như gương mặt của bất cứ một người đàn bà nào).
Tuy sống lưu vong gần như suốt đời, ông được coi là nhà thơ vĩ đại của cả nửa thế kỷ, và chỉ cầu mong ông sống thêm 4 năm nữa là "thế kỷ của chúng ta" có được sự tận cùng vẹn toàn. Ông rời Nga-xô đã hai chục năm, cái chết của ông khiến cho căn nhà Nga bây giờ mới thực sự trống rỗng.
Ông sang Mỹ, nhập tịch Mỹ, yêu nước Mỹ, làm thơ, viết khảo luận bằng tiếng Anh. Nhưng nước Nga là một xứ đáo để (Chắc đáo để cũng chẳng thua gì quê hương của mi...): Anh càng rẫy ra, nó càng bám chặt lấy anh cho tới hơi thở chót.
Nhớ Joseph [không có ly cà phê kế bên]
Hôm qua, tớ nhận được 1 tấm cạc, về buổi tưởng niệm Jospeph… tớ cố “mình lại bảo mình” đang cảm thấy như thế nào. Nhưng tớ “cũng” cẩn trọng. Sau cả tháng, tớ vưỡn chưa làm sao nghĩ, Joseph đã chết!
Lẽ tất nhiên, tớ cũng biết là bạn mình đã chết, nhưng chỉ khi tự bắt mình tưởng tượng ra bạn mình, ở giữa những người đã chết, mà những người này thì phải là những thân nhân trong gia đình, một, hay hai, người bạn.
Họ vẫn còn và Em vẫn còn
và viết cho những ai nữa…
MT
có những đầy vơi trên cốc rượu
có trắng một màu tuyết với đông
có dáng ai ngồi chân chữ ngũ
đậy chặt nút chai rượu với người
CT
có lá rơi đầy không thứ tự
có vàng ươm đẫy những mùa thu
có đôi chân cũ xào xạc cũ
nhốt tiếng dương cầm trong ngón tay
TTT
có hoa có cỏ và lệ đá
có tiếng xuân về gọi vang vang
có ai về gióng hồi chuông mới
khép lại một lần với lưu vong
DT
có đen có trắng không hơn kém
có bóng hạ mềm rũ trên môi
có bàn chân sỏi đều trên cát
ngày tắt trên nền khung vải đen
Và Em
có tháng năm già hơn tất cả
có em độ lượng với thời gian
có bờ ngực dậy cho tôi thở
những biến thiên thầm cõi ba sinh
Đài Sử
Note: Tuyệt cú. Thần cú!
Bài thơ nào ứng với ông nấy. Nhưng tuyệt nhất, là khúc sau cùng:
Có tháng năm già hơn tất cả.
Câu này làm nhớ Brodsky:
Bao thơ tôi, ít nhiều chi, là về cùng một điều - về Thời Gian. Về thời gian làm gì con người.
"All my poems are more or less about the same thing – about Time. About what time does to Man."
Joseph Brodsky.

First Meeting: My Unreliable Memory
His trial, in Leningrad, in February 1964, and the sentence of five years' hard labor for "social parasitism", meaning not so much political dissent, as an unorthodox or unconventional style of life - in a totalitarian state, the distinction in any case was academic - had attracted international attention. The trial itself included some memorable exchanges between the accused and the court, which were bravely noted down at the time and widely reported in the West. Perhaps the most notorious example:
JUDGE: Who recognized you as a poet? Who enrolled you in the ranks of poets?
BRODSKY: No one. And who enrolled me in the ranks of humanity?
JUDGE: And did you study this?
BRODSKY: This?
JUDGE: To become a poet. You have not tried to enter the university where they give instruction ... where they study ...
BRODSKY: I did not think ... I did not think that this was a matter of instruction.
JUDGE: What is it then?
BRODSKY: I think that it is ... from God."
This still takes my breath away! God? His seriousness, sincerity is unmistakable. No irony, not at that time. Or was he simply at a loss for words? Did he fall back in defiance - although the tone here suggests confusion rather than defiance - on the concept of God, anathema to the atheistic state, even in its milder post- Stalinist form? There is a certain helplessness, as though he'd no alternative but to plainly state what he believed ...
    Do what he might to deflect questions about the trial, Joseph could not prevent its becoming an ingredient in the legend constructed around him. ("Legend", I hear him exclaim, as he did once when questioned about Solzhenitsyn, "what legend?"


Vụ án của ông, tại Leningrad Tháng Hai, 1964, và bản án, 5 năm lao động khổ sai vì là tên ăn hại xã hội, không nặng về mặt bất đồng chính kiến với nhà nước, nhưng quả là đã gây sự chú ý trên toàn thế giới.
Phiên tòa, chính nó, thì lại chứa đựng những chi tiết thần sầu, thí dụ đoạn dưới đây, về cuộc đấu súng giữa ông tòa và bị cáo:
Ai xác nhận mi là thi sĩ. Ai đưa mi vào hàng ngũ những nhà thơ?
Chẳng ai cả. Ai đưa ta vào hàng ngũ nhân loại?
Nhưng mi có học cái này?
Cái này là cái gì?
Trở thành thi sĩ. Mi có bao giờ ghi tên vô đại học, ở đó, họ dậy mi...
Ta không nghĩ có cái chuyện học vấn, dậy dỗ ở đây
Vậy thì là gì?
Ta nghĩ, đây là do... ông Trời
Ui chao, tui ná thở. Cái sự nghiêm trang, thành thực, cù lần – nếu có thể gọi – thì không làm sao mà nghi ngờ được, ở đây.
Tếu táo, cà chớn lại càng không. Nhất là vào lúc này.
Nhưng..  Ông Trời, ở đây, thú thiệt!
Hay là ông không kiếm ra từ?
Hay là ông lùi lại, trong dáng điệu thủ thế, khinh bỉ, hay thách đố, ta đéo thèm nói chuyện với mi nữa!
Tuy nhiên giọng điệu, lộn xộn, mập mờ, hơn là thách thức....
Theo GCC, Brodsky, khi trả lời VC Liên Xô, như trên, là do thực tình ông tin, ông là thi sĩ, là do ông Trời quyết định!
Nên nhớ, Brodsky là dân Ky Tô, thơ của ông, đầy chất Ky Tô. Ngay cả cái chuyện ông bị chúng bắt, là cũng do ông Trời quyết định.
Ông như “mặc khải”, ta sinh ra để đụng cú này!
David Remnick giải thích thật tuyệt thái độ của Brodsky, khi ra tòa, trong 1 bài viết đăng trên “Người Nữu Ước”, GCC, lần đầu tiên đọc, lần đầu tiên biết đến Brodsky, những ngày mới ra hải ngoại, và bèn dịch liền tù tì, với vốn tiếng Anh ăn đong của mình, hà, hà!
Có nhiều nhà thơ có tài, có thể ở vào chỗ anh ta khi đó, Efim Etkind viết. Nhưng số phận đã chọn đúng anh ta, và ngay lập tức anh hiểu trách nhiệm về địa vị của anh - không còn là một con người riêng tư, nhưng trở thành một biểu tượng, như Akhmatova đã trở thành một biểu tượng quốc gia của người thi sĩ Nga, khi bà bị số phận lọc ra giữa hàng trăm nhà thơ, năm 1946. Thật quá nặng cho Brodsky. Ông có một bộ não tệ, một trái tim tệ. Nhưng ông đã đóng vai ông tại tòa án một cách tuyệt vời.
Theo dòng suy nghĩ, như trên, thì đại thi sĩ Kinh Bắc, được Ông Trời cho ra đời, là để đụng cú viết tự kiểm, và để phán, tao đéo viết!
1963 chấm dứt thời kỳ Băng Tan, với Khruschev. Thời kỳ tân-Stalinist kéo dài 20 năm sau đó. Ngay cả bây giờ, một vài sử gia vẫn còn tự hỏi tại sao chính quyền Cộng-sản bắt đầu cuộc thanh trừng bằng cách bắt giữ một nhà thơ 23 tuổi chưa được nhiều người biết tới. Nhưng đó chỉ là một bí mật đối với người nào còn nghi ngờ bản năng của thú dữ khi nhận ra đâu là nguy cơ lớn lao nhất đối với chế độ. Và bắt lầm còn hơn bỏ sót. Tiếp theo sắc lệnh của Tối-cao Xô-viết, tăng cường cuộc chiến đấu chống lại những thành phần vô dụng đối với xã hội, KGB Leningrad đã bắt giam Brodsky về những tội: Có quan điểm thế giới có hại cho nhà nước, thoái hóa, "hiện đại", bỏ học và dĩ nhiên, ăn bám... ngoài chuyện làm thơ xấu xa, làm hư hỏng tuổi trẻ. Một số nhà văn nhà thơ đứng sau ông, nhưng đồng minh quan trọng nhất của ông là nữ ký giả Frida Vigdorova, đã can đảm tham dự phiên tòa, ghi lại hết những diễn biến rồi quảng bá những tài liệu đó. "Bản tin" của nữ ký giả này được coi là một tác phẩm văn học mang tính chống độc tài, chống chế độ tập trung quyền lực, hơn cả những tác phẩm của Havel:
Tòa án: Công việc của anh?
Brodsky: Tôi làm thơ, tôi dịch thuật. Tôi tin rằng...
Tòa án: Không có "Tôi tin rằng". Đứng thẳng lên. Không được dựa vào tường. Trả lời Tòa án như đã được chỉ định. Nào, bây giờ anh làm việc toàn thời gian phải không?
Brodsky: Tôi nghĩ tôi có một việc làm toàn thời gian, vâng.
Tòa án: Trả lời rõ rệt.
Brodsky: Tôi làm thơ. Tôi nghĩ chúng sẽ được xuất bản. Tôi tin tưởng rằng...
Tòa án: Tòa không cần biết tới chuyện "Tôi tin rằng". Hãy trả lời, tại sao anh không làm việc?
Brodsky: Tôi làm việc, tôi làm thơ.
Tòa án: Tòa không quan tâm tới chuyện đó. Tòa quan tâm tới xí nghiệp mà anh làm việc.
Brodsky: Tôi có hợp đồng với nhà xuất bản.
Tòa án: Hợp đồng có cho anh đủ tiền để nuôi sống bản thân không? Hãy kể chúng ra, cho biết rõ ngày tháng, số tiền.
Brodsky: Tôi không nhớ rõ. Luật sư của tôi giữ những hợp đồng đó.
Tòa án: Tòa hỏi anh.
Brodsky: Ở Moscow, hai cuốn sách dịch thuật của tôi đã được in.
Tòa án: Kinh nghiệm làm việc của anh?
Brodsky: Nhiều hay ít...
Tòa án: Tòa không quan tâm đến chuyện nhiều hay ít.
Brodsky: 5 năm.
Tòa án: Anh làm việc ở đâu?
Brodsky: Trong xưởng thợ. Với đoàn thám hiểm...
Tòa án: Đại khái, chuyên môn của anh là gì?
Brodsky: Thi sĩ, dịch giả.
Tòa án: Ai chỉ định anh là thi sĩ? Ai cho anh vào hàng ngũ những thi sĩ?
Brodsky: Chẳng ai cả. Ai cho tôi vào hàng ngũ nhân loại?
Tòa án: Anh có học về cái đó không?
Brodsky: Học về cái gì?
Tòa án: Để trở nên thi sĩ. Anh không hề cố gắng học xong trung học, nơi mà người ta sửa soạn cho anh, người ta dậy anh...
Brodsky: Tôi không tin chuyện này liên quan đến học vấn.
Tòa án: Như vậy là thế nào?
Brodsky: Tôi nghĩ... vậy thì, tôi nghĩ, điều đó đến từ ông Trời.
Một người làm chứng nói con trai của anh ta đã rơi vào ảnh hưởng xấu xa của Brodsky, và đã bỏ việc làm, quyết định nó cũng là thiên tài. Cũng người này đã nói, thơ của Brodsky, những suy tư về thời gian, sự chết, tình yêu, có vẻ chống Xô-viết. "Bài nào?", Brodsky ngắt lời. "Hãy kể tên một bài". Người đó chịu thua.
Vigdorova viết thư cho Chukovskaya về phiên tòa: Có thể một ngày nào đó, anh ta là một nhà thơ lớn. Nhưng làm sao tôi quên nổi vẻ mặt của anh ta, lúc đó - không trông mong một sự trợ giúp, ngạc nhiên, khôi hài, và thách đố, tất cả cùng một lúc".
*

The Gift

"Thiên tài" Brodsky: Những hạnh của bất hạnh
Joseph Brodsky and the fortunes of misfortune.
А что до слезы из глаза—нет на нее указа, ждать до дргого раза.
Meaning, roughly: “As for the tears in my eyes/ I’ve received no orders to keep them for another time.”
Về những giọt nước mắt trong mắt tôi/Tôi không nhận được mệnh lệnh nào để giữ chúng cho một lần khác.

Cách nhìn của Bengt Jangfeldt về thái độ đối với quê hương thứ nhì, Mẽo, của Brodsky, bảnh hơn, và thống nhất hơn, [trên cái nền, “đi là đi một lèo, không nhìn lại”, của Brodsky], so với tác giả bài viết trên Người Nữu Ước. Nhưng bài mới này lại cho chúng ta  nhiều chi tiết mới mẻ về Brodsky, thí dụ cái vụ ông bị bắt, giai thoại của Akhmatova về ông em, đã mướn nhà nước VC Liên Xô viết tiểu sử của mình…]

Ở mức độ cá nhân, cách nhìn đời của nhà thơ là: “đường một chiều”. Một sự trở lại với cái gì đã qua, - một đời sớm sủa trước đó, một người đàn bà – là chuyện không thể. Trong Tháng Chạp ở "December in Florence" (1976), viết về thi sĩ Dante và thành phố quê hương, về nhà thơ và số phận lưu vong của ông, Florence nhập vào với Leningrad, thành phố quê hương của Brodsky [nguyên văn: thành phố Florence bung đôi ra, double-exposed, với một thành phố khác – Leningrad]:
There are, writes Brodsky,
    … cities one won't see again. The sun
    throws its gold at their frozen windows. But all the same
    there is no entry, no proper sum.
    There are always six bridges spanning the sluggish river.
    There are places where lips touched lips for the first time ever,
    or pen pressed paper with real fervor.
    There are arcades, colonnades, iron idols that blur your lens.
    There the streetcar's multitudes, jostling, dense,
    speak in the tongue of a man who's departed thence.
[Có những thành phố mà ta sẽ chẳng nhìn thấy nữa. Mặt trời dát vàng lên những khung cửa sổ gía lạnh. Nhưng cũng vậy thôi,
không lối vào, không có một tổng kết nào thỏa đáng.
Luôn luôn vẫn là sáu cây cầu bắc qua con sông lững lờ.
Có những chốn, nơi môi chạm môi lần đầu trong đời,
hay bút hằn lên giấy.
Có những vòm cung, những hàng cột, những tượng sắt làm mờ kiếng bạn.
Nhộn nhịp, chen chúc, dầy đặc là những chuyến xe điện,
Nói tiếng nói của người sẽ ra đi, từ đấy. 
[Từ đấy trong tôi bừng nắng hạ], nhưng thôi, kệ mẹ mọi cái thứ rác rưởi, kệ mẹ cả lò chủ nghĩa Cộng Sản, [In spite of all Communism], St. Petersburg của nhà thơ vẫn luôn luôn là “thành phố đẹp nhất trên thế giới”. Sự trở về, là không thể, trước tiên là vì chế độ chính trị khốn kiếp đó, lẽ tất nhiên, nhưng sâu thẳm hơn, là yếu tố tâm lý này: “Con người chỉ dời đổi theo một chiều. Và chỉ từ. And only from. Từ một nơi chốn, từ một ý nghĩ đã đóng rễ ở trong đầu, từ chính hắn ta hay là y thị… nghĩa là, hoài hoài dời xa cái điều mà con người đã kinh nghiệm, đã từng trải.
Cuộc lữ của con người, như là một cá thể, trong thời gian và không gian, chỉ là để biệt tích, lọt vào cõi không, the non-existence, trong chuyến bay lịch sử. Không hẳn là bởi vì loài người rồi sẽ bị tiêu diệt bởi chiến tranh, bởi bom nguyên tử, nhưng những xã hội, những nền văn minh, như từng cá thể, đều bị chi phối bởi cuộc chiến thời gian, the time war. Với Brodsky, đe dọa lớn do những thay đổi về dân số sẽ là hiểm họa cho văn minh Tây Phương vốn dựa trên cá nhân [individual-based civilization]. Một đề tài cứ trở đi trở lại đối với cả hai nhà thơ Nga,  Brodsky và Osip Mandelstam, là vai trò của một thế giới Ky Tô ngày một giảm dần, nhuờng chỗ cho cảm tính bài-cá nhân của một thế giới ngày một thêm đông người. Bởi vì đối với cả hai, Ky Tô giáo trước tiên, và trên hết, là vấn đề của văn minh, do đó, tương lai của cá nhân nhập với tương lai của thế giới: Cái chết của cá nhân là cái chết của chủ nghĩa cá thể.
From Russia With Love
Nghĩa địa Do Thái ở Leningrad
Gấu Cà Chớn nhớ là, đọc đâu đó, hình như trên net, khi Nguyễn Đình Thi sắp sửa đi xa, ông con ghé tai ông bố hỏi, bi giờ, bố tính sao, tính vô Văn Điển [hay Mai Dịch gì đó, nơi dành riêng cho đám VC chóp bu nằm, sau khi chết], cho có bạn, hay là kiếm chỗ khác… NDT quắc mắt, phán, KHÔNG, ông con mừng quá, tính đứng lên, thì ông bố níu lại, thôi, con ạ, làm như thế là mày mất phần thịt đấy, cứ chôn tao ở chỗ nhơ bửn, cứt đái đó, cũng xứng với tao vậy!
Mất "phần thịt", là Gấu phịa ra, khi nhớ tới bà nội của Gấu, suốt đời, mong nhìn thấy thằng cháu được 15 tuổi, được coi là 1 suất đinh, và "được" có phần thịt chia, vào những dịp lễ lạc lớn trong họ!
Reading in Iowa City, Iowa
SOME YEARS ago, Joseph came to Iowa City, the University of Iowa where I directed the Translation Workshop, to give a reading; I was to read the English translation. At the end, he was asked a number of (mostly loaded) questions, including one (alluded to earlier) about Solzhenitsyn. "And the legend which had been built around him?" His answer managed to be both artfully diplomatic and truthful: "Well, let's put it this way. I'm awfully proud that I'm writing in the same language as he does." (Note, again, how he expresses this sentiment in terms of language.) He continued, in his eccentrically pedagogical manner, forceful, even acerbic, but at the same time disarming, without any personal animus: "As for legend ... you shouldn't worry or care about legend, you should read the work. And what kind of legend? He has his biography ... and he has his words." For Joseph a writer's words were his biography, literally!
    On another visit to Iowa, in 1987, Joseph flew in at around noon and at once asked me what I was doing that day. I told him that I was scheduled to talk to an obligatory comparative literature class about translation. "Let's do it together", he said. Consequently I entered the classroom, with its small contingent of graduate students, accompanied by that year's Nobel Laureate.
    Joseph indicated that he would just listen, but soon he was engaging me in a dialogue, except it was more monologue than dialogue. Finally, he was directly answering questions put to him by the energized students. I wish I could remember what was said, but, alas, even the gist of it escapes me now. I did not debate with him, even though our views on the translation of verse form differed radically. Instead, I believe that I nudged him a little, trying - not very sincerely or hopefully, though perhaps in a spirit of hospitality and camaraderie - to find common ground. After the class, I walked back with him to his hotel, as he said he wanted to rest before the reading. On the way, the conversation, at my instigation, turned to Zbigniew Herbert, the Polish poet so greatly admired by Milosz and, I presumed, by Brodsky, and indeed translated by the former into English and by the latter into Russian. Arguably, Herbert was the preeminent European poet of his remarkable generation. He was living in Paris and apparently was not in good health. "Why hasn't Zbigniew been awarded the Nobel Prize? Can't something be done about it", I blurted out - recklessly, tactlessly, presumptuously. The subtext was: Surely you, Joseph Brodsky, could use your influence, etc. Joseph came to a standstill: "Of course, he should have it. But nobody knows how that happens. It's a kind of accident." He locked eyes with me. "You're looking at an accident right now!" This was not false modesty on his part, but doubtless he was being more than a little disingenuous. Nevertheless, I believe that, at a certain level, he did think of his laureateship as a kind of accident. Paradoxically, while he aimed as high as may be, he was not in the business of rivalling or challenging the great. They remained, in a sense, beyond him, this perception of destiny and of a hierarchy surely being among his saving graces.
    In a far deeper sense, though, they were not in the least beyond him, nor was he uncompetitive, but it did not (nor could it) suit his public or even private persona to display this.
Brodsky certainly considered himself to be - and it is increasingly clear that he was - in the grand line that included Anna Akhmatova, Boris Pasternak, Osip Mandelstam and Marina Tsvetayeva. Even I sensed this, despite my ambivalence about his poetry. Indeed, the continuity embodied in his work accounts, in part, for my uncertainty: I have tended to rebel against grand traditions. But perhaps this is to exaggerate. At times I hear the music, at other times the man, even if, as a rule, I do not hear them both together ...
    But take, for instance, this (the last three stanzas of "Nature Morte" in George Kline's splendid version in the Penguin Selected Poems):    
Mary now speaks to Christ:
"Are you my son? - or God?
You are nailed to the cross.
Where lies my homeward road?
How can I close my eyes,
uncertain and afraid?
Are you dead? - or alive?
Are you my son? - or God?
Christ speaks to her in turn:
"Whether dead or alive,
Woman, it's all the same-
son or God, I am thine."
It is true that, as I listen to or read the English, I hear the Russian too, in Joseph's rendition. I even see Joseph, his hands straining the pockets of his jacket, his jaw jutting, as though his eye had just been caught by something and he were staring at it, scrutinizing it, while continuing to mouth the poem, almost absent-mindedly, that is, while the poem continues to be mouthed by him. His voice rises symphonically: Syn ili Bog (Son or God), "God" already (oddly?) on the turn towards an abrupt descent; and then the pause and a resonant drop, a full octave: Ya tvoi (I am thine). And the poet, with an almost embarrassed or reluctant nod, and a quick, pained smile, departs his poem.
Note: Gấu post bài này, quá thú, tất nhiên, còn là để cám ơn một vì độc giả, đã sửa giùm đoạn thơ trong bài, liên quan tới Chúa Hài Đồng, vì cũng sắp đến Giáng Sinh rồi!
For Joseph a writer's words were his biography, literally!
Với Joseph, những từ của nhà văn viết ra, là tiểu sử của người đó rồi
Rõ ràng là Joseph coi mình thuộc dòng cực sang, của những nhà cực bảnh, của truyền thống "nhớn", trong có Anna Akhmatova, Boris Pasternak, Osip Mandelstam and Marina Tsvetayeva…. Tôi, [Daniel Weissbort] nhiều lúc muốn nổi loạn chống lại những truyền thống lớn, nhưng có lẽ, chỉ là cường điệu…
Đôi khi tôi nghe âm nhạc [của thơ], đôi khi tôi nghe giọng nói của 1 con người… , và, như 1 định luật, đôi khi, tôi đếch nghe cả hai!
The Brodsky Winners!
Giải thưởng Brodsky
Maria Sozzani Brodsky
November 6, 2014 Issue 
To the Editors:
The Joseph Brodsky Fund is pleased to announce its 2014 fellowships in poetry and the visual arts. The fellowship in poetry has been awarded to Mikhail Yeremin and the fellowship in the visual arts to Natalia Pershina Yakimanskaya. The fellowships will enable Mr. Yeremin and Ms. Pershina Yakimanskaya to spend the fall of 2014 in Rome pursuing their work.
The Joseph Brodsky Memorial Fellowship Fund began in 1995, when Mr. Brodsky approached the mayor of Rome to urge the creation of a Russian Academy there. A group of Mr. Brodsky’s friends assembled after his death to continue his effort. The fund has struggled to fulfill its work amid the recent political turmoil—events that only magnify the need to foster international conversation. We are grateful to our donors, many of them readers and contributors to The New York Review.
Maria Brodsky
President
 The Joseph Brodsky Memorial Fellowship Fund
 New York City

Son of Man and Son of God
Tuesday, July 29, 2014 4:11 PM
Thưa ông Gấu,
Xin góp ý với ông Gấu về một đoạn thơ đã post trên trang Tinvan.
Nguyên tác:
Christ speaks to her in turn:
“Whether dead or alive
woman, it’s all the same –
son or God, I am thine 
Theo tôi, nên dịch như sau:
Christ bèn trả lời:
Chết hay là sống,
Thưa bà, thì đều như nhau –
Con, hay Chúa, ta là của bà 
Best regards,
DHQ 
Phúc đáp:
Đa tạ. Đúng là Gấu dịch trật, mà đúng là 1 câu quá quan trọng.
Tks again.
Best Regards
NQT
Verrà la morte e avrà i tuoi occhi.- Cesare Pavese
From Russia With Love

From Russia With Love
"Tenderly Yours"
IT IS HIS tenderness, in particular, that I recall. He verbalized it, without embarrassment, making frequent use of the word itself, which, to say the least (also a favorite Brodskyan expression), is not much employed in Anglo-Saxon male society. And it is tenderness I feel for him now. He ended his letters with a "kisses, kisses" or "tenderly yours", and even on the phone, instead of good-bye, there'd be a brisk yet, yes, tender: "kisses, kisses!" And then he'd wait, never in a hurry to break off. (This may sound sentimental, but maybe he was for ever saying goodbye for the last time.) Although by many whose paths he crossed he is remembered as abrasive, pugnacious, he displayed an unostentatious strength, a tender strength.
    Here was something I had not noted: his strength or courage. Reading recently about his time in the Arkhangelsk Region (he was sentenced to five years, in I964, but released after twenty months of exile), I at first found it hard to reconcile the modest, rumpled, even somewhat disreputable if cocky figure with the man of principle, of valour. But then I understood that it was this courage that informed his personality. It was so much a part of him that one took it for granted. At least, I had so taken it. As if I were too close to see what was evident to others, even if fate had been immeasurably kinder to me than to him. It was something of a mystery to me that I could not love the poems as I did the man. Indeed, the poetry almost got in the way, as if I was jealous of his art, as of a rival for his affection! The poetry, even if he identified fully with it, represented his mission rather than himself, having as much to do with the language or with history ...

    I suppose I should make a distinction between the two. His preoccupation with language - Russian, of course, but also English, which he was in the process of idiosyncratically making his own - I shared. It was the glare of the power-and-the-glory, from which I shielded myself.
     Yes, I have begun to realize, after his death, that courage was the catalyst ...

    Clichés are knocking at the door! It is rather that there was a sudden awareness of the whole man, whereas I'd seen only pieces before. The loss was overwhelming! I suppose that is why
I am writing now, trying to keep the awareness intact, not allowing it to fade prematurely. As if it would? Still, I want my quotidian self, which has no option but to negotiate with the world, to absorb it. It? Joseph. Our paths crossed at festivals and conferences. For instance, in 1979, at the University of Maryland, a "Symposium of Literary Translation and Ethnic Community" [sic!], we were on a panel. The panellists sat in a row; on the platform, at a long table. A "dialogue" between translators and translatees was supposed to take place ...
    Joseph and I meet by chance at breakfast. A vast self-service canteen. Joseph asks the woman behind the counter if she has any stronger coffee. She doesn't understand. He capitulates: "OK, make it regular." We go to a table, and he talks briefly about so-called "regular" American coffee. (I've come rather to like this innocuous beverage, which looks but doesn't really taste
like coffee.) He lights a cigarette - you could still smoke on campuses then - and presses his hand to his chest, grimacing. A few moments later he lights up again ...
    He underwent his first heart surgery in December 1978. I felt the closeness of his death, certainly. He lived with it every day. So, why didn't he stop smoking? When I was diagnosed with cancer of the mouth, in 1982, I at once quit smoking, far too frightened not to. For Joseph, not quitting was even more suicidal. Was it his courage, paradoxically, that allowed him to continue smoking? Or perhaps, he did not love himself enough, did not value his own life enough. More precisely, his individual life? Or perhaps he just enjoyed living dangerously? To live meant to live dangerously.

Bồ tèo, bồ tèo!
Đúng là từ của Joseph [Huỳnh Văn], như Gấu còn nhớ được!
Anh lèm bèm hoài, trong khi trong lũ bạn quí chẳng ai thèm dùng, nó có vẻ bình dân, mùi mẫn, đờn bà quá!
Nhưng chính là từ bồ tèo mà Gấu đang cảm nhận về bạn của mình, đấng bạn độc nhất...
Bồ tèo, mi viết bài về TTT đó, là vì ta mà viết, đâu phải vì TTT, đúng không, hà, hà!
[Dịch nhảm, trong khi nhớ bạn. Bài viết này, sẽ dịch liền, cũng thật là thú vị. Bạn, và còn là dịch giả, của Brodsky, Daniel Weissbort nhớ lại, bạn của mình, khi được dịch qua tiếng Anh, như cái tiểu tít cho thấy: Joseph Brodsky trong tiếng Anh, in English]
Joseph trải qua cuộc giải phẫu tim, lần thứ nhất Tháng Chạp, 1978. Rõ ràng là tôi cảm thấy bạn của mình cận kề cái chết. Anh sống với nó mọi ngày. Nếu thế, tại sao không bỏ hút thuốc? Khi tôi biết mình bị ung thư, là bèn bỏ hút thuốc lá lập tức. Trường hợp Joseph,  đúng là quá cả tự sát!
Liệu đây cũng là do can đảm, mà ông có thừa?
Hay có thể, do ông đếch “tự mình mình lại yêu mình sót sa”, đủ đô?
Đếch coi mình ra cái chó gì?
Hay là ông khoái sống theo kiểu đó: cực kỳ nguy hiểm.
Bởi vì sống, là sống 1 cách cực kỳ nguy hiểm!
Cái vụ Điếu Cày bị bắt cóc đi Mẽo, thẳng từ trại giam VC, làm GCC nhớ đến trường hợp Brodsky. Ông “có hẹn với nhà nước Liên Xô tại Đồn Công An”. (1) Tới, chúng chìa ra cái đơn, bắt ký vô, ông biểu, tao đâu có muốn rời xa Gấu Mẹ Vĩ Đại; chúng hăm, sẽ nóng lắm đấy; nhưng tao đâu có bà con ở nước ngoài, chúng nói, có rồi, nhà nước lo hết rồi, mày phải gọi ông ta bằng…  chú!
Bạn phải đọc lời cám ơn nước Mẽo của bà vợ Điếu Cày thì mới thấy đắng! Đù má thằng Yankee mũi lõ & mũi tẹt, chúng mày âm mưu với nhau, tao không làm sao nói được 1 tiếng bye bye với chồng tao!
Hà, hà!
(1)
"Vĩ Đại Thay, Là Đồn Công An!
Đó là nơi tôi có hẹn với Nhà Nước."
 'What a great thing is a police station!
 The place where I have the rendez-vous with the State'. 
[Phu quân tôi, nhà thơ] Mandelstam thường nhắc câu trên, của Khlebnikov.
 Nadezhda Mandelstam: "Hy Vọng Chống Lại Hy Vọng"
Không hiểu Yankee mũi lõ, qua cái loa tiếng Vịt của chúng, có đọc Tin Văn hay là không, giả như có đọc, thì Gấu cũng chẳng lấy đó làm hãnh diện, nhưng chúng có đi 1 đường phân bua, Điếu Cầy gật đầu, khi được hỏi, đi Mẽo, nhé?
Cái loa Hồng Mao thì chắc chắn có đọc TV. Chúng đã từng sửa hơn 1 cái lỗi, khi viết/dịch trật, sau khi GCC chỉ ra những lầm lẫn của chúng: “livre de poche”, thì viết thành “livre en poche”, “quần đảo”, thì biến thành “bán đảo” Gulag.
Khi ở Trại Tị Nạn Thái Lan, Gấu có nghe tin Mẽo cho phi cơ trực thăng tới Trại Hồng Kông, bốc thẳng con của me-xừ BT, qua Mẽo!
Thảo nào, ông bố bèn xin 1 chân tà lọt tại Đài Vòa Là!
Một tên trí thức VC, bỏ chạy VC, ra hải ngoại, thiếu gì chỗ để viết, sao không biết nhục, mà lại chui vô Vòa Là!
Lũ VC Bắc Kít ở Hà Nội, mò sang ổ VC Bắc Kít ở Mẽo, ngửa tay lấy tiền Mẽo, viết về lưu vong Mít, chúng thực sự chẳng hề biết gì, cũng đếch biết nhục là gì hết!
Làm sao mà không mất nước cho được.
Gấu về lại Đất Bắc, gia đình chia cho 1 bản copy gia phả mang về Canada, đọc, thì thấy mấy ông chú ông bác, trong gia phả, ông nào cũng có những dòng vinh danh, đã từng qua TQ thụ huấn, đã từng khệ nệ mang khí giới viện trợ về làm thịt thằng em Nam Bộ...
Bất giác bèn nhớ tới lời bà chị, cả lò nhà mày là CS, ra ngoài đó liệu liệu mà viết
Cả lò Bắc Kỳ làm nô lệ cho thằng Tẫu, thì có!
Vậy mà bầy đặt "thoát Trung"! NQT
Brodsky chẳng hề muốn lưu vong, hay được Mẽo bốc. Nhưng số kiếp của ông [do ông chọn], đi là đi 1 lèo, không nhìn lại, như Bengt Jangfeldt đã từng đi 1 bài thần sầu về ông: Joseph Brodsky: Người hùng Virgil: Đi để mà đừng bao giờ trở về. [A Virgilian Hero, Doomed Never to Return Home]. (1)
Trước khi rời nước Nga, Brodsky viết cho Bí thư Đảng Cộng-sản Liên-xô, Leonid Brezhnev: "Tôi thật cay đắng mà phải rời bỏ nước Nga. Tôi sinh ra tại đây, trưởng thành tại đây, và tất cả những gì tôi có trong hồn tôi, tôi đều nợ từ nó. Một khi không còn là một công dân Xô-viết, tôi vẫn luôn luôn là một thi sĩ Nga. Tôi tin rằng tôi sẽ trở về, thi sĩ luôn luôn trở về, bằng xương thịt hoặc bằng máu huyết trên trang giấy... Chúng ta cùng bị kết án bởi một điều: cái chết. Tôi, người đang viết những dòng này sẽ chết. Còn ông, người đọc chúng, cũng sẽ chết. Tác phẩm, việc làm của chúng ta sẽ còn lại, tuy không mãi mãi. Đó là lý do tại sao đừng ai can thiệp kẻ khác khi kẻ đó đang làm công việc của anh ta."
Chẳng bao giờ có bất cứ lý do gì để trở lại St. Petersburg:
 Having sampled two oceans as well as continents,
 I feel that I know what the globe itself must feel: there's no where to go.
 Elsewhere is nothing more than a far-flung strew
 of stars, burning away.
 (Tạm dịch:
 Đã nếm trải hai đại dương cũng như hai lục địa
 Tôi cảm thấy rằng, tôi biết được, chính trái đất này phải cảm nhận như thế nào:
 Không có nơi nào để mà thoát cả.
 Bất kỳ đâu đâu, có khác gì một chùm sao xa xăm tắt lịm dần.
 Hoặc: 
 Đất, biển nào
 cũng thế thôi 
Cũng đành như trái đất cũng đành:
 Chẳng có nơi nào, để mà đi tới
 Cứ như chòm sao,
 thất tán,
 tắt lịm dần)
Tẫu có câu thật là hay, người quân tử đi qua vườn dưa, thì đừng cúi xuống buộc dây giầy, là theo ý này.
Cái họa Mẽo, như Graham Greene chỉ ra, trong Người Mẽo Trầm Lặng, chưa hết đâu. Cái bóng của GG kéo dài mãi ra, quá thế kỷ 21!
Mẽo tốt quá, cái đó mới khổ:
“Tôi cầu mong Chúa làm cho anh hiểu được những gì anh đang làm ở đây. Ôi, tôi hiểu rất rõ, những nguyên nhân, những mục đích, những ý hướng tốt đẹp của anh.  Chúng luôn luôn tốt… Tôi chỉ mong, đôi khi anh có được một vài ý hướng xấu, có lẽ anh sẽ hiểu thêm được một tí, về thế thái nhân tình, về con người. Điều này áp dụng luôn cho cả cái xứ Mẽo của anh đấy, Pyle ạ.”
Nhưng theo Zadie Smith [Guardian], Pyle không chịu học. Sau cùng, anh ta cho rằng, niềm tin quan trọng hơn hoà bình, tư tưởng sống động hơn con người. Sự ngây thơ của anh ta, trên bình diện thế giới, chẳng khác gì một thứ chính thống giáo [fundamentalism]. Đọc lại cuốn truyện càng củng cố thêm lên nỗi sợ của  Zadie Simith, về tất cả những me-xừ Pyle trên toàn thế giới. Họ đâu có muốn làm cho chúng ta bị thương tổn. Chúng tôi tới với bạn là do thiện ý, do niềm tin, cơ mà?

Nghĩa địa Do Thái ở Leningrad
The Jewish cemetery near Leningrad.
A crooked fence of rotten plywood.
And behind it, lying side by side,
lawyers, merchants, musicians, revolutionaries.
They sang for themselves.
They accumulated money for themselves.
They died for others.
But in the first place they paid their taxes, and
respected the law,
and in this hopelessly material world,
they interpreted the Talmud, remaining idealists.
Perhaps they saw more.
Perhaps they believed blindly.
But they taught their children to be patient
and to stick to things.
And they did not plant any seeds.
They never planted seeds.
They simply lay themselves down
in the cold earth, like grain.
And they fell asleep forever.
And after, they were covered with earth,
candles were lit for them,
and on the Day of Atonement
hungry old men with piping voices,
gasping with cold, wailed about peace.
And they got it.
As dissolution of matter.
Remembering nothing.
Forgetting nothing.
Behind the crooked fence of rotting plywood,
four miles from the tramway terminus.
Joseph Brodsky
Nghĩa địa Do Thái gần Leningrad
Một hàng rào gỗ cong queo, mục nát
Và đằng sau nó, nằm, kế bên nhau
luật sư, thương nhân, nhạc sĩ, những nhà cách mạng
Họ hát cho họ
Họ tích tụ tiền bạc cho họ
Họ chết cho những người khác
Nhưng trước hết, trên hết, họ đóng thuế
Và tuân theo luật pháp
Và trong cái thế giới trần tục, vật chất, vô hy vọng
Họ giải thích Kinh Talmud, và luôn giữ mình,
như những con người lý tưởng
Có thể họ nhìn nhiều hơn
Có thể, họ mù lòa tin tưởng
Nhưng họ dậy con cái hãy kiên nhẫn
Và bám sát vào sự vật
Và họ không gieo mầm
Họ không hề gieo mầm
Họ giản dị nằm xuống
Trên đất lạnh như hạt
Và chìm vào giấc ngủ đời đời
Và sau đó, đất phủ họ
Những cây đèn cầy vì họ được đốt lên
Và vào cái Ngày Chuộc Lỗi, Đền Tội
Những ông già đói khát, với giọng như tiếng sáo,
Thở hổn hển vì lạnh
Rên rỉ về hòa bường, hòa bường
Và họ có nó
Như phân huỷ vật chất
Nhớ, chẳng nhớ gì
Quên, chẳng quên gì
Đằng sau hàng rào gỗ cong queo mục nát
Cách trạm xe điện cuối bốn dặm.
"Cemetery", as this poem is called in the article, is uncharacteristic, not only on account of the subject but prosodically as well. The first stanza is rhymed, but thereafter the poem resolves itself into vers libre. I know of no other poem like it in Joseph's published oeuvre. Indeed, were it not that he never denied writing it, one might almost have thought it was by someone else. In a sense, perhaps it was.
    I never discussed it with Joseph, since we didn't talk about our Jewishness, or even Judaism as such, though I may have mentioned my own ambivalence. While it is sometimes suggested or claimed that Joseph had rejected Judaism, as far as I know he neither embraced it nor denied it. I think that his attitude did not really change. He was a Jew of the assimilated, Russified kind, a "bad Jew", as he put it, and not much interested in adopting or reclaiming the tradition; in short, he was no "refusenik". On the other hand, for instance, Anthony Rudolf, co-editor of the international anthology Voices Within the Ark: The Modern Jewish Poets (1980) tells me that when asked if he would be willing to be included in the book, Joseph replied that he wanted to be in it. And when, for instance, he was asked at a press conference in Stockholm, in December 1987, at the Nobel ceremonies, how he would describe himself, he answered: "I feel myself a Jew, although I never learnt Jewish traditions." He added, however: "But as for my own language, I undoubtedly regard myself as Russian."
    Being a Jew, like being an exile, has certain advantages, in that (anywhere other than in Israel, perhaps New York, or wherever Jewish ghettos survive) it situates one on the margins, rather than at the centre of society. Jews tend to take on the colour of their surroundings. Jewish history, as a whole - and even "bad" Jews are heirs to that history - gives the individual Jew a claim, however tenuous, on a variety of cultural or linguistic territories. This is a source of strength, but also of weakness, in that he may feel that he truly belongs to none. Of course, Joseph did live in New York, but he was frequently on the road, in the States or abroad, and had another home in New England. Further- more, his exceptionally wide, international circle of friends and acquaintances far transcended the Jewish cultural world, assuming that there is such a thing.
"Nghĩa địa" như bài thơ được gọi, trong bài viết, thì chẳng hay ho gì, không chỉ ở cái giọng kể lể, mà còn cả ở cái chất thơ xuôi của nó. Khổ đầu thì còn có vần điệu, nhưng sau biến thành thơ tự do. Ngoài nó ra, không còn bài nào như thế, trong số tác phẩm của Joseph... nhưng khi được 1 tay xb hỏi, có cho nó vô 1 tuyển tập Những tiếng nói ở bên trong [chiếc thuyền] Noé: Những nhà thơ Do Thái Hiện Đại, do anh ta xb, hay là không [Anthony Rudolf, co-editor of the international anthology Voices Within the Ark: The Modern Jewish Poets (1980) tells me that when asked if he would be willing to be included in the book], Brodsky nghiêm giọng phán, ta "muốn" có nó, trong đó!
Hay, thí dụ, trong lần trả lời báo chí Tháng Chạp, 1987, ở Stockholm, khi tới đó lấy cái Nobel, “Tớ thấy tớ như 1 tên…  Ngụy, dù chưa từng biết truyền thống Ngụy nó ra làm sao”, và nói thêm, “Về ngôn ngữ của riêng tớ, thì đúng là của 1 tên… Mít”!
Là 1 tên Ngụy, thì giống như 1 tên lưu vong, có tí lợi; nó đẩy tên đó ra bên lề, thay vì ở trung tâm xã hội. Lũ Ngụy có thói quen choàng cho chúng 1 màu của chung lũ chúng, ở loanh quanh chúng. Lịch sử Ngụy ban cho từng cá nhân Ngụy 1 thứ văn hóa, và đây là nguồn sức mạnh của chúng, nhưng vưỡn không làm sao giấu được nhược điểm, là ở bất cứ đâu, bất cứ lúc nào, nó cảm thấy chẳng ra cái chó gì cả, hắn đếch thuộc về ai, về đâu, đại khái thế!

        
From Russia With Love 
Tatyana Tolstaya, translated from the Russian by Jamey Gambrell
February 29, 1996 Issue
When the last things are taken out of a house, a strange, resonant echo settles in, your voice bounces off the walls and returns to you. There’s the din of loneliness, a draft of emptiness, a loss of orientation and a nauseating sense of freedom: everything’s allowed and nothing matters, there’s no response other than the weakly rhymed tap of your own footsteps. This is how Russian literature feels now: just four years short of millenium’s end, it has lost the greatest poet of the second half of the twentieth century, and can expect no other. Joseph Brodsky has left us, and our house is empty. He left Russia itself over two decades ago, became an American citizen, loved America, wrote essays and poems in English. But Russia is a tenacious country: try as you may to break free, she will hold you to the last.
In Russia, when a person dies, the custom is to drape the mirrors in the house with black muslin—an old custom, whose meaning has been forgotten or distorted. As a child I heard that this was done so that the deceased, who is said to wander his house for nine days saying his farewells to friends and family, won’t be frightened when he can’t find his reflection in the mirror. During his unjustly short but endlessly rich life Joseph was reflected in so many people, destinies, books, and cities that during these sad days, when he walks unseen among us, one wants to drape mourning veils over all the mirrors he loved: the great rivers washing the shores of Manhattan, the Bosporus, the canals of Amsterdam, the waters of Venice, which he sang, the arterial net of Petersburg (a hundred islands—how many rivers?), the city of his birth, beloved and cruel, the prototype of all future cities.
There, still a boy, he was judged for being a poet, and by definition a loafer. It seems that he was the only writer in Russia to whom they applied that recently invented, barbaric law—which punished for the lack of desire to make money. Of course, that was not the point—with their animal instinct they already sensed full well just who stood before them. They dismissed all the documents recording the kopecks Joseph received for translating poetry.
“Who appointed you a poet?” they screamed at him.
“I thought…. I thought it was God.”
All right then. Prison, exile.
Neither country nor churchyard will I choose
I’ll come to Vasilevsky Island to die,
he promised in a youthful poem.
In the dark I won’t find your deep blue façade
I’ll fall on the asphalt between the crossed lines.
I think that the reason he didn’t want to return to Russia even for a day was so that this incautious prophecy would not come to be. A student of—among others—Akhmatova and Tsvetaeva, he knew their poetic superstitiousness, knew the conversation they had during …
Note: Bài tưởng niệm Brodsky, và 1 bài nữa, trên tờ Người Nữu  Ước, Gấu đã từng chôm, để viết về Joseph Huỳnh Văn, và Đỗ Long Vân. Về cái dòng "I thought ... I thought it was God”, thì được tác giả “From Russia With Love”, đi 1 bài về Thượng Đế của Brodsky, tức Ky Tô giáo. TV sẽ đi liền.
Một đấng thi sĩ Mít cho rằng, làm đếch gì có 1 ông Joseph Brodsky, tín hữu Kyto, trong khi Joseph là tên thánh của ông.
Một ông khác, thì tự hỏi, tại làm sao lại là…  “Joseph” Huỳnh Văn?  Ông này, viết về Joseph HV, chôm thơ của ông, trên TV, nhưng lại nhớ là, đã đọc trên Thời Tập của VL, trong khi Joseph HV chưa từng viết cho bất cứ 1 tờ nào, trước 1975, trừ báo của ông, là tờ Tập San Văn Chương!
Ở ý này, tôi rất tâm đắc với những điều mà Giáo sư Sture Allen đã thay mặt Viện Hàn Lâm Thụy Điển đọc diễn từ Tuyên dương Joseph Brodsky, nhà thơ Nga có quốc tịch Mỹ, tại lễ trao giải Nobel văn chương năm 1987: “…Chiều kích tôn giáo mà ta nhất định có thể tìm thấy trong tác phẩm của ông (J. Brodsky) không gắn liền với một tín điều cụ thể nào…”!
Võ Chân Cửu (1)
Nhân tiện, GCC bèn đính chính 1 điều, về... Solz:

Khác Brodsky, Solz chưa từng là công dân Mẽo. Đây là lầm lẫn không phải của chỉ 1 tên Mít, do không đọc thấu bài biết của Ha Jin về ông, mà còn luôn cả giới báo chí Mẽo. Họ nghe tin gia đình Solz tham dự buổi lễ tuyên thệ, lãnh thẻ công dân US, bèn kéo nhau tới để chụp hình, nhưng đếch thấy Solz đâu cả.
Sau đó, bà vợ ông giải thích, ông nhà tôi nghĩ, không cần, vì, thế nào ông về lại được Nga, trước khi chết, và trước khi Liên Xô sụp đổ!


From Russia With Love  

Perhaps he could have slipped into Russia unannounced, as the fiction writer Tatyana Tolstaya suggests, in a novelistically transcribed interview:
"Do you know, Joseph, if you don't want to come back with a lot of fanfare, no white horses and excited crowds, why don't you just go to Petersburg incognito?" [. . .] Here I was talking, joking, and suddenly I noticed that he wasn't laughing [. .. ] He sat quietly, and I felt awkward, as if I were barging in where I wasn't invited. To dispel the feeling, I said in a pathetically hearty voice: "It's a wonderful idea, isn't it?" He looked through me and murmured: "Wonderful. . . Wonderful ... "
Wonderful, but too late.
Ai cho phép anh là thi sĩ?


-Này thi sĩ, nếu ông muốn về không ngựa trắng mà cũng chẳng cần đám đông reo hò, ngưỡng mộ, tại sao ông không về theo kiểu giấu mặt?
-Giấu mặt?
Đột nhiên thi sĩ hết tức giận, và cũng bỏ lối nói chuyện khôi hài. Ông chăm chú nghe.
-Thì cứ dán lên một bộ râu, một hàng ria mép, đại khái như vậy. Cần nhất, đừng nói cho bất cứ một người nào. Và rồi ông sẽ dạo chơi giữa phố, giữa người, thảnh thơi và chẳng ai nhận ra ông. Nếu thích thú, ông có thể gọi điện thoại cho một người bạn từ một trạm công cộng, như thể ông từ Mỹ gọi về. Hoặc gõ cửa nhà bạn: "Tớ đây này, nhớ cậu quá!" 
Giấu mặt, tuyệt vời thật!       
Nhưng trễ quá mất rồi 
Tuy sống lưu vong gần như suốt đời, ông được coi là nhà thơ vĩ đại của cả nửa thế kỷ, và chỉ cầu mong ông sống thêm 4 năm nữa là "thế kỷ của chúng ta" có được sự tận cùng vẹn toàn. Ông rời Nga-xô đã hai chục năm, cái chết của ông khiến cho căn nhà Nga bây giờ mới thực sự trống rỗng.
Ông sang Mỹ, nhập tịch Mỹ, yêu nước Mỹ, làm thơ, viết khảo luận bằng tiếng Anh. Nhưng nước Nga là một xứ đáo để (Chắc đáo để cũng chẳng thua gì quê hương của mi...): Anh càng rẫy ra, nó càng bám chặt lấy anh cho tới hơi thở chót.
Tolstaya 
Điều Tolstaya cầu mong, Brodsky chẳng hề, như trong bài “Nữu Ước: Nhà”, cho thấy: 
Joseph did not expect to live into the next century anyway, and perhaps in a way didn't want to.
Brodsky chẳng mong sống thêm bốn năm, và có lẽ, trong một cách nào đó, ông đếch muốn!
Tuyệt! 
Quá trễ?
Tại sao? 
Daniel Weissbort giải thích:
Wonderful, but too late. After all, one of Joseph's great achievements, as George Kline has pointed out, had been to throw himself into the language and literature of his adopted country. He rejected the path of nostalgia, regret, self-pity,lamentation, the fatal choice (if one can call it that) of so many émigré writers, especially poets. And what now, when he was no longer technically an involuntary exile? He had refused to complain about it, just as he refused to complain about his treatment in Russia, or his lack of a formal education. On the contrary, he had valued exile to the arctic region as liberating. And the education in question was a Soviet one, though when he said that the "earlier you get off track the better", he may not have been referring exclusively to the Soviet system.
Tuyệt vời, nhưng quá trễ. Nói cho cùng, một trong những thành tựu lớn lao của Brodsky, như George Kline chỉ ra là, ông tự ném mình vô ngôn ngữ và văn chương của cái nước đã cưu mang, chấp nhận ông. Ông đá đít ba cái trò hoài hương, ân hận, tiếc nuối, tự thương thân trách phận, vãi nước đái, hay sự “chọn lựa tàn khốc” – cái gì gì, “hành lạc trong đau đớn, bạo dâm” cái con mẹ gì đó, như một tên khốn nào đó có thể gọi - của rất nhiều nhà văn di dân, đặc biệt là những nhà thơ, và đặc biệt nữa, lũ nhà thơ Mít – Nhưng, cái gì, bây giờ đây, một khi ông không còn là một kẻ lưu vong không tự nguyện, về mặt kỹ thuật?  Ông từ chối phàn nàn về sự đối xử ở Liên Xô, hay về mình đếch có học vấn. Ngược lại, ông đánh giá cao cái sự lưu vong, và đẩy nó tới miền của giải phóng.
-Ai chỉ định anh là thi sĩ?
Đám Cộng sản Liên-xô đã từng hét vào mặt ông như vậy tại phiên tòa. Họ chẳng thèm để ý đến những tài liệu, giấy tờ chứng minh từng đồng kopech ông có được qua việc sáng tác, dịch thuật thi ca.
-Tôi nghĩ có lẽ ông Trời.

Daniel Weissbort đi 1 bài về cái từ Trời này, hay nói rõ hơn, Ky Tô giáo, ở Brodsky. TV sẽ đi bài này, vì thú thực, vốn là 1 tên “vô đạo”, Gấu không làm sao đọc nổi 1 số thơ của Brodsky
"The Jewish Cemetery in Leningrad"
VENICE. I have not been there, but Joseph's Venice and even his Petersburg are familiar urban landscapes. Even if Joseph made little of it, perhaps his Jewishness was also in evidence. A sense of doom, of endurable disaster; of self-depreciation as well, alienation, although he managed to combine this with a kind of assertiveness, so that it never turned into Jewish selbsthass. In a way, the Jewishness was a given. Indeed, it was better not stated, since it could so easily lead to identification with victimhood. That may be why he never, so far as I know, re-printed the early "The Jewish Cemetery in Leningrad", another poem that I translated, also because of its overtly Jewish content, unique in his work. The poem may not be written from the point of view of a victim, but the Jew as victim or scapegoat features in it. Oddly - or not so oddly - this somewhat juvenile work was mentioned in an article entitled "A Literary Drone" in Vechernii Leningrad (Evening Leningrad) in November 1963, a sort of prologue to the famous trial in February. Casting around for evidence in his writings of "Jewish nationalism", which even so late in the history of the Soviet Union was still a heinous sin, all his accusers could come up with was this poem (friends of Joseph were also named, Vladimir Shveigolts, Anatoly Geikh- man, Leonid Aronzon, all typically Jewish names):
The Jewish cemetery near Leningrad.
A crooked fence of rotten plywood.
And behind it, lying side by side,
lawyers, merchants, musicians, revolutionaries.
They sang for themselves.
They accumulated money for themselves.
They died for others.
But in the first place they paid their taxes, and
respected the law,
and in this hopelessly material world,
they interpreted the Talmud, remaining idealists.
Perhaps they saw more.
Perhaps they believed blindly.
But they taught their children to be patient
and to stick to things.
And they did not plant any seeds.
They never planted seeds.
They simply lay themselves down
in the cold earth, like grain.
And they fell asleep forever.
And after, they were covered with earth,
candles were lit for them,
and on the Day of Atonement
hungry old men with piping voices,
gasping with cold, wailed about peace.
And they got it.
As dissolution of matter.
Remembering nothing.
Forgetting nothing.
Behind the crooked fence of rotting plywood,
four miles from the tramway terminus.
"Cemetery", as this poem is called in the article, is uncharacteristic, not only on account of the subject but prosodically as well. The first stanza is rhymed, but thereafter the poem resolves itself into vers libre. I know of no other poem like it in Joseph's published oeuvre. Indeed, were it not that he never denied writing it, one might almost have thought it was by someone else. In a sense, perhaps it was.
    I never discussed it with Joseph, since we didn't talk about our Jewishness, or even Judaism as such, though I may have mentioned my own ambivalence. While it is sometimes suggested or claimed that Joseph had rejected Judaism, as far as I know he neither embraced it nor denied it. I think that his attitude did not really change. He was a Jew of the assimilated, Russified kind, a "bad Jew", as he put it, and not much interested in adopting or reclaiming the tradition; in short, he was no "refusenik". On the other hand, for instance, Anthony Rudolf, co-editor of the international anthology Voices Within the Ark: The Modern Jewish Poets (1980) tells me that when asked if he would be willing to be included in the book, Joseph replied that he wanted to be in it. And when, for instance, he was asked at a press conference in Stockholm, in December 1987, at the Nobel ceremonies, how he would describe himself, he answered: "I feel myself a Jew, although I never learnt Jewish traditions." He added, however: "But as for my own language, I undoubtedly regard myself as Russian."
    Being a Jew, like being an exile, has certain advantages, in that (anywhere other than in Israel, perhaps New York, or wherever Jewish ghettos survive) it situates one on the margins, rather than at the centre of society. Jews tend to take on the colour of their surroundings. Jewish history, as a whole - and even "bad" Jews are heirs to that history - gives the individual Jew a claim, however tenuous, on a variety of cultural or linguistic territories. This is a source of strength, but also of weakness, in that he may feel that he truly belongs to none. Of course, Joseph did live in New York, but he was frequently on the road, in the States or abroad, and had another home in New England. Further- more, his exceptionally wide, international circle of friends and acquaintances far transcended the Jewish cultural world, assuming that there is such a thing.
“The Jewish Cemetery in Leningrad" is not a good poem; it may even be a bad poem. And my reasons for translating it may not have been praiseworthy either. The poem seemed to me even then somewhat jejune. Those interred in Leningrad's Jewish cemetery were cut off ("sang for themselves "), landless ("they never planted seeds, only themselves") and superstitious, imprisoned by tradition ("hungry old men with piping voices"). Their hopes or beliefs were illusory: the peace they prayed for came to them as "dissolution of matter". There is no light; there is not even a "nobody in a raincoat". And that's partly the trouble. The poem is programmatic, its theme too large, given the means at the young poet's disposal. It is as if he simply did not know what to do with the material. But this in itself interested me, particularly in view of the extraordinary sureness of his hand in all the other poems I'd looked at, even from that early period. It may have been the first of the few poems by Joseph that I translated. For me it was a place of meeting with him, this having nothing, I suppose, to do with its literary worth.
    When I asked Joseph if I might reprint my version, his response was: "Do what you like, Danny!" So, either he didn't give a damn, or he was disposed to indulge me. Perhaps both. Might he have responded differently, had I put it differently, viz. "Would you rather I didn't use it, Joseph?" After all, he had not said anything about his inclusion in the original Yevtushenko anthology, until Max Hayward gave him the opportunity to refuse, whereupon he did refuse!
New York: Home
AS HE AGED - and in his last years he aged very fast, as if trying to catch up with or even overtake his own end - a kind of world- weariness (mellowness?) seemed to be replacing the earlier acerbity. Even so, the world was still a wonderful place. Joseph's creativity did not desert him.
Talking of wonderful places, what of Joseph and New York City? This was his home for most of his time in the West, even though from 1981 he taught in the spring at Mount Holyoke College and rented a home in South Hadley, Massachusetts. He was also in the habit of spending Christmas in Venice. The Joseph I knew, however, was the New York Joseph, even though I met him first in London and, at least in the seventies, often saw him there, and even though my first visit to him in America was to Ann Arbor, Michigan when he was poet-in-residence at the University of Michigan. I visited him only once in Emily Dickinson country.
New York became his home and he was at home in New York. Or that's how it seemed. The City lets (or encourages?) you to be whatever you are, meaning that, wherever you hail from, it is not really possible to continue being a stranger or foreigner there. Everyone is both outsider and insider. To live in New York is to become a native New Yorker. If Joseph was going to fit anywhere, it was in New York.
But there is something else. The scale of the city, even if it is now matched by other urban conglomerations, still frees one from the need to measure up to one's environment. It is impossible to measure up to New York. Actually, its scale is still unique.
Perhaps it is the only truly twentieth-century city, which would also means that, among cities, it is the one and only true child of the nineteenth-century. What will it be in the twenty-first century? Joseph did not expect to live into the next century anyway, and perhaps in a way didn't want to. The world is, or appears to be changing radically, while he had sweated blood surviving in it as was. After all, even so brave and virtuoso an improvisers as Joseph has his limits. The price of further change might simply have been too great.
For instance, Russia. There was no longer any impediment to his returning. On the contrary, he would have received a hero's welcome. But he was a world citizen, or rather he was a New Yorker. A hero's welcome might have disturbed the equilibrium he had achieved, at who knows what cost. And besides, as he was fond of saying, being outside was the best situation for the artist. Being a New Yorker allowed him to be outside and at the same time to enjoy the horny comforts it offered.
Perhaps he could have slipped into Russia unannounced, as the fiction writer Tatyana Tolstaya suggests, in a novelistically transcribed interview:
"Do you know, Joseph, if you don't want to come back with a lot of fanfare, no white horses and excited crowds, why don't you just go to Petersburg incognito?" [. . .] Here I was talking, joking, and suddenly I noticed that he wasn't laughing [. .. ] He sat quietly, and I felt awkward, as if I were barging in where I wasn't invited. To dispel the feeling, I said in a pathetically hearty voice: "It's a wonderful idea, isn't it?" He looked through me and murmured: "Wonderful. . . Wonderful ... "
Wonderful, but too late. After all, one of Joseph's great achievements, as George Kline has pointed out, had been to throw himself into the language and literature of his adopted country. He rejected the path of nostalgia, regret, self-pity,lamentation, the fatal choice (if one can call it that) of so many émigré writers, especially poets. And what now, when he was no longer technically an involuntary exile? He had refused to complain about it, just as he refused to complain about his treatment in Russia, or his lack of a formal education. On the contrary, he had valued exile to the arctic region as liberating. And the education in question was a Soviet one, though when he said that the "earlier you get off track the better", he may not have been referring exclusively to the Soviet system.
Furthermore, his own generation, as he acknowledged, was what mattered to him. He kept up, to a remarkable extent, with what was being written by his younger contemporaries, but his real sympathies were with those of his own generation. Although, with the unanticipated collapse or abdication of the Soviet imperial power, he came to see many of his friends again, he had both intellectually and emotionally bade them" farewell" (proshchaite), not "good-bye" (do svidanie, "see you again "). In a sense, the reunions must have been posthumous affairs. So, when he was shown photos, taken shortly before his departure from the Soviet Union, he suddenly became serious, solemn, grim: "One's affinity is for the generation to which one belongs ... Theirs is the tragedy ... " Not of those who emigrated or, like himself, were given little choice other than to leave. And as for himself, well, he had exchanged oppression for freedom and all kinds of material advantage. He had no patience with talk of exile. Perhaps the dissolution of the Soviet State, its transformation, rather than opening the way for his return, simply confirmed his Americanness ...
Or rather, his New- Yorkerness. New York, as he put it, "reduces you to a size". It is a gigantic impediment to gigantism. And yet, at the same time, it is human. The scale of its monumentality is human. It was also a "Mondrian city". Who, familiar or besotted with New York, does not know what he meant by that? The perpendicularity and horizontality; windows, facades, facets ...
Anyway, it was his city; that is, he made it his. And he was right about it. In this place, you were not greater than yourself; you were "reduced to a size" (curious that use of the indefinite article), the right size, your own human size. It's not true that you were dwarfed by those canyons; they are clearly the product of human labour, an index to human industry. And strangely heartening, too, even now, nearly a century on ...
But now I am waxing sentimental. Thinking about the city now, at age sixty-one, it seems to me not a bad place to die in. I remember being told by Ted Hughes, ten or twenty years ago already, that we had reached the age when the Indian princes abandoned their worldly concerns and retired to the forests. Perhaps New York is the equivalent for urban man? As if one’s death there would be less unbearably personal, with that crush of people which somehow leaves you uncrushed, so you feel, even in your isolation, part of a far greater organism, an organism in that it doesn't (quite) self-destruct. There's one positive effect being "reduced to a size". Joseph, having been deprived of what, as a Jew, he possibly never quite possessed, Russia, having "quit the country that bore and nursed him" and having been forgot - ten by so many - first you have to be known by so many -, having suffered catastrophic loss, however much he insisted that he had left the worse for the better, was now threatened with the early loss of his life. Under these circumstances, New York, perhaps, fitted the bill.
I am waiting for Joseph in Washington Square. It looked like rain before, but it hasn't rained yet. I am watching the skateboarders, the jugglers, the children, the clochards, the mothers, the gangs of youths. Nobody pays any attention to me, and I suddenly feel blissfully unselfconscious. Joseph arrives late. He shuffles over, grinning wryly. He seems in no hurry and doesn't apologize. There is a stillness about him. Suddenly I feel, by contrast, tense, anxious.
We stroll into the Village, towards one of his favourite restaurants. And now it is raining or drizzling. He has to call Maria. He uses a street phone. At the same time, he conveys to me that nothing has changed ...


 

Cuốn sách về Brodsky này, như lời Bạt cho thấy, có cùng tuổi [hải ngoại] của Gấu, 1997, hay đúng hơn, kém Gấu ba tuổi.
Gấu làm quen Brodsky thời gian này, nhân đọc Coetzee viết về những tiểu luận của ông, trên tờ NYRB; bài tưởng niệm khi ông mất, của Tolstaya...
Trong cuốn này, có nhắc tới bài viết, Gấu chôm, xen với những kỷ niệm về Joseph Huỳnh Văn, trong bài “Ai cho phép mi là thi sĩ”
Post ở đây, rảnh rang lèm bèm sau.
Thú nhất câu: "Hãy nhớ Gấu, và quên số mệnh cà chớn của Gấu"!
"Remember me, but ah! Forget my fate!"
Postface
Monday, 19 May, 1997
WHEN I BEGAN this writing almost a year and a half ago, I intended ...
    Well, I intended nothing. Rather, I was dealing, as best I could, with a persistent grief. And that led me to revisit our various times together. And that, in its turn, led me back to his writing, or one might say led me to it for the first time, because - as he put it: "all that is left of a man is a part of speech." I tried to separate the strands of our understandings and misunderstandings. The journal became as much a self-interrogation as an interrogation of our friendship. I found myself moving, quite confusingly, between private and public, between affinities, issues of friendship, and problems of translation. Of course, the journal is also about translation. It is a confession, too, although I have tried to limit that aspect of it, and not only because I know how much Joseph disliked confessionalism.
    While writing, I have talked to others. I have been made aware of many different points of view, which not surprisingly are often conflicting. From these I have taken what seemed to illuminate my own perceptions and ignored, or left for others to explore or not explore, those which it seemed impertinent to work with. It has not been hard for me to steer clear of his "private life", since I was hardly privy to it. Quite a few of my remarks are speculative. But I have tried, in general, not to over- indulge myself in what at worst is simply fiction-making.
    As I looked at one or two of Joseph's translations and, again, at many of his Russian poems, I was once more brought up against my ignorance, my over-dependency on intuition, my inability to pick up allusions. I also became aware - as I hardly was before - of the scale of the Russian tragedy, the truly heroic grandeur of the life, say, of Akhmatova. And Brodsky.
    I have been listening to Purcell's Dido and Aeneas. And were I not convinced that it would come across as sentimental, I would re-name thjs manuscript "Remember Me". Dido cries: "Remember me, but ah! forget my fate!" In a letter to Brodsky probably 10 July I965; for an English translation, see Anna Akhmatova, My Half Century, Selected Prose, 1992) Akhmatova writes: "I'm at the hut. The well creaks, the ravens caw. I'm listening to the Purcell (Dido and Aeneas) that was brought on your recommendation. It is so powerful that it's impossible to talk about it." In an earlier letter (20 October I964) she had written: "Promise me one thing - that you will stay perfectly healthy, there's nothing on earth worse than hot-water bottles, shots, and high blood pressure - and the worse thing is that it's irreversible. And if you are healthy, golden paths, happiness, and that divine communion with nature, which so captivates all those who read your poetry,may await you." Alas, he was unable to heed her advice, but the reciprocal nature of their relationship, in spite of the age difference, is evident. One understands, he observed, walking beside Akhmatova, why Russia was sometimes ruled by empresses. But he did walk beside her.
*
Considered by many to be the greatest Russian poet of his generation, Joseph Brodsky (1940-1996) received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1987. By this time he was a fluent writer and speaker of English - yet when exiled from the Soviet Union in 1972 (after serving 18 months of a five-year sentence in a labour camp) he was practically restricted to his native tongue. Brodsky, like Nabokov, became that most rare and intriguing of writers - one who mastered English as a second creative language and re- invented himself in it.
Daniel Weissbort was closely associated with Brodsky as friend and translator. In addition to being a fascinating biographical (and autobiographical) study, From Russian with Love provides detailed discussion of the problems of Englishing Brodsky's poems. Iris a telling contribution to translation studies and a searching meditation on the nature of language itself.
Daniel Weissbort, born in I93S. co-founded with Ted Hughes the journal Modern Poetry in translation which he edited from 1965-1003. He directed the Translation Workshop at the University of Iowa for many years. His translations from Russian include the Selected Poems of Nikolai Zabolotsky and his most recent book of poems is Letters to Ted (Anvil. 2002).
He lives in London.
Bài tưởng niệm Brodsky của Tolstaya, mà Gấu chôm, viết về bạn không quí Joseph HV, cũng có tí kỷ niệm thú vị.
NTV khi đó chưa về xứ Mít ở luôn, ghé nhà chơi, lấy tờ NYRB có bài viết về đọc, than, mi lọc ăn hết thịt, chỉ cho độc giả tí xương, ra ý, bài viết thì còn nhiều chi tiết quá hay, Gấu đếch dịch!
Không phải vậy.
Cái phần Gấu giữ lại, là tính để dành, cho 1 dịp khác.
Sau đó, Gấu đưa vô bài viết về Đỗ Long Vân, bạn của Joseph Huỳnh Văn, và đưa vô bài thơ gửi cho… Gấu Cái, như 1 lời tạ lỗi, cả 1 đời, mi đâu có dành cho ta dù chỉ nửa phút, mà chạy theo hết con này đến con kia!
Tatyana Tolstaya, trong một bài tưởng niệm nhà thơ Joseph Brodsky, có nhắc đến một cổ tục của người dân Nga, khi trong nhà có người ra đi, họ lấy khăn phủ kín những tấm gương, sợ người thân còn nấn ná bịn rịn, sẽ đau lòng không còn nhìn thấy bóng mình ở trong đó; bà tự hỏi: làm sao phủ kín những con đuờng, những sông, những núi... nhà thơ vẫn thường soi bóng mình lên đó?
Chúng ta quá cách xa, những con đường, những sông, những núi, quá cách xa con người Đỗ Long Vân, khi ông còn cũng như khi ông đã mất. Qua một người quen, tôi được biết, những ngày sau 1975, ông sống lặng lẽ tại một căn hộ ở đường Hồ Biểu Chánh, đọc, phần lớn là khoa học giả tưởng, dịch bộ "Những Hệ Thống Mỹ Học" của Alain. Khi người bạn ngỏ ý mang đi, ra ngoài này in, ông ngẫm nghĩ rồi lắc đầu: Thôi để cho PKT ở đây, lo việc này giùm tôi.... (2)
NQT
GCC có đọc trên net, đâu đó, của 1 người, biết những ngày sau cùng, và cái chết đau buồn của DLV. Nó làm Gấu nhớ đến truyền thuyết về những con voi già, biết giờ chết của mình, bèn bò về nghĩa địa của loài voi…
Trong "Một Chủ Nhật Khác", TTT có nhắc tới giai thoại này, và cho biết thêm, cái tay kiếm ra Đà Lạt, và dựng nó thành 1 thành phố, là 1 trong những con voi, những cột trụ chống Trời, cho dân Mít.
Đâu có phải tự nhiên mà cuộc tình thần sầu chấm dứt cõi văn chương Ngụy thần sầu diễn ra ở Đà Lạt!
[Viết câu này là viết riêng cho Gấu, nhe!]
Ui chao, bạn DLV của GCC, lập lại y chang giai thoại, về tên Ngụy cuối cùng đó: Ta đếch đi đâu, cũng chẳng về nghĩa địa voi ở Đà Lạt, ta chọn 1 xó xỉnh nào của Sài Gòn, để chết.
*  
 Hi vọng
Tặng em, như một lời tạ tội
Người Nga, khi người thân vĩnh biệt
Thường phủ kín những tấm gương
Để người đi không đau lòng, hoảng hốt
Hồn còn đây, bóng đã không còn
Người Việt thường dặn dò
Hồn đừng quên
Con đường trở lại làm trẻ thơ
Mỗi lần qua sông, qua biển
Anh mong có em ở bên
Bởi vì chẳng bao giờ anh tìm thấy
Hình bóng anh
Ở trong em
Nhưng biết đâu, vào giờ phút chót
Tuổi thơ của anh, của em
Nhập làm một
Em chẳng hằng mong
Đừng ai đi trước 
NQT


* *

Xuống tiệm sách cũ, vồ được cuốn này, quá tuyệt.
Post liền bài thơ “Nghĩa địa Văn Điển ở Hà Lội”. Bài này Gấu thấy rồi, tính giới thiệu rồi, nhưng nay có thêm 1 ấn bản nữa, kèm cả 1 chương sách về nó. Thú quá!
Còn vồ thêm được mấy cuốn nữa, cũng quá OK. Thơ của Bertold Brecht, thí dụ, quí vị độc giả TV, xin từ từ.... hà, hà!
The Jewish cemetery near Leningrad.
The Jewish cemetery near Leningrad.
A crooked fence of rotten plywood.
And behind it, lying side by side,
lawyers, merchants, musicians, revolutionaries.
They sang for themselves.
They accumulated money for themselves.
They died for others.
But in the first place they paid their taxes, and
        respected the law,
and in this hopelessly material world,
they interpreted the Talmud, remaining idealists.
Perhaps they saw more.
Perhaps they believed blindly.
But they taught their children to be patient
and to stick to things.
And they did not plant any seeds.
They never planted seeds.
They simply lay themselves down
in the cold earth, like grain.
And they fell asleep forever.
And after, they were covered with earth,
candles were lit for them,
and on the Day of Atonement
hungry old men with piping voices,
gasping with cold, wailed about peace.
And they got it.
As dissolution of matter.
Remembering nothing.
Forgetting nothing.
Behind the crooked fence of rotting plywood,
four miles from the tramway terminus.
THE JEWISH CEMETERY
The Jewish Cemetery near Leningrad:
a lame fence of rotten planks
and lying behind it side by side
lawyers, businessmen, musicians, revolutionaries. 
They sang for themselves,
got rich "for themselves,
died for others.
But always paid their taxes first;
        heeded the constabulary,
and in this inescapably material world
studied the Talmud,
        remained idealists.
Maybe they saw something more,
maybe believed blindly.
In any case they taught their children
        tolerance. But
        obstinacy. They
sowed no wheat,
        never sowed wheat,
simply lay down in the earth
        like grain
and fell asleep forever.
Earth was heaped over them,
.andles were lit for them,
and on their day of the dead raw voices of famished
old men, the cold at their throats,
shrieked at them, “Eternal peace!”
Which they have found
        in the disintegration of matter,
remembering nothing
forgetting nothing
behind the lame fence of rotten planks
four kilometers past the streetcar terminal.
1967, translated with
Wladimir Weidlé
W.S. Merwin

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Bi Khúc

TDT

Hoàng Hạc Lâu